Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

I noted similarities to The Stepford Wives and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner myself when I saw it. It definitely is a creepy film.

Yes, I meant to mention the parallels to the (original, better) STEPFORD WIVES. 

I don’t like GUESS WHO’s COMING...I’m not saying that the comparison between it and GET OUT is off, it’s not at all. I’m just saying I don’t like GUESS WHO’s COMING...

THE GROUNDSKEEPER aka GRANDPA sounded quite a bit like Sidney Poitier to me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GET OUT also invokes some of the really ugly, racist, sort of Eugenicsy moments in the stories of HP Lovecraft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

PATHS OF GLORY is one of Kubrick's all time best, and I've heard many put it on their top ten best list, even from those who don't care for Kubrick's films in general. There is much to recommend it.

You have a great performance from Kirk Douglas as the officer who tries in vain to defend and save the 3 men chosen to be the sacrifice of the power-hungry generals. And you have superb actors like Adolph Menjou and George Macready as the ambitious officers who seek the glory for themselves in a mission doomed to failure from the start and  when it does fail, want to take it out on their men in their division rather than face up to their own screw-ups. And Wayne Morris is such a marvelous weasel in here (a sharp contrast to his real life heroism in the war).

The movie doesn't end on a happy note, but rarely does any of Kubrick's films have a happily-ever-after-note. It was a box office flop at the time, but time has proven its worth through the decades.

PATHS OF GLORY Is a perfect film. It’s also remarkably short, it and THE LOST PATROL (1934) are two War Films that pack an incredible punch in a really short time.

I kind of wish Kubrick had taken the lean mean machine approach more often , Because he does it well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appointment With Death (1988)

Peter Ustinov's sixth and final portrayal of Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, this time with on location shooting in Israel, the setting of the story. It's the same formula, as always, as a rich cantankerous individual is murdered, and it's up to Poirot to use his deductive reasoning (along with a strong tendency to eavesdrop a lot prior to the crime) to find the killer amidst an all star cast.

This final effort is watchable but feels awfully familiar if you've already seen any of the previous efforts. It lacks the sumptuous photography and lush settings of Ustinov's first two films, Death on the Nile and Evil Under The Sun, and the cast of stars doesn't seem quite as impressive either. Piper Laurie plays the domineering harridan who inherits a fortune (after secretly having a second will, not so kind to her, destroyed) then decides to take her grumbling family of disinherited sons and daughters on a tour of Europe and Palestine. Among the star suspects for Poirot to investigate will be Lauren Bacall, Carrie Fisher, Hayley Mills and David Soul. John Gielgud also appears as a colonel in charge of the investigation who lets Poirot take over.

appointment-e1587806541519.png?w=772

I will admit that I did not identify the killer but I like to think that's because the film's screenplay doesn't play fair with the audience. Poirot only points out the killer's motive (previously kept secret) at the same time as making the identification. Well, even if the screenplay had provided a few more clues in advance I still might not have gotten it anyway but at least there would have been more of a sporting chance.

Between the filming of this film and Evil Under the Sun six years before Ustinov had also played the detective in three made-for-TV dramas of middling quality. Ustinov remained fun to watch as Poirot in all six efforts.

MV5BOTM2ZWMwZGEtYzc4Zi00M2JmLWIwZjQtMTUx

2.5 out of 4

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom, Agatha Christie turned Appointment with Death into a play and changed the killer. Some of the subsequent movie/TV versions follow the book, some follow the play.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kingrat said:

Tom, Agatha Christie turned Appointment with Death into a play and changed the killer. Some of the subsequent movie/TV versions follow the book, some follow the play.

The clue of the victim "grunting rudely", which the movie awkwardly glosses over, was, in some versions, supposed to point to the killer using the stolen hypodermic to give the victim a paralyzing drug to throw off the time of death.  (Or at least was the case in the David Suchet version, I haven't seen the book or play.)

Still, at least this is one of the last "good" Golan/Globus versions of Agatha Christie that relatively follows the more respectable Peter Ustinov A-movie formulas.   G/G's version of Ten Little Indians (1989) set at a safari outpost has also finally surfaced on streaming, and, um...WOW.  That one's a little closer to what you'd picture from "Golan/Globus does Agatha Christie as a Cannon picture".  😱

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've been watching "Perry Mason" on HBO and trying to find some redeeming value in it. . Does Perry own a razor or an iron? Because the actual Perry Mason wouldn't be caught dead so habitually and poorly groomed. And then when the series starts I go, OK, so they messed up when they took the dapper attorney and turn him into a film noir era PI except these are the 1930s. So I figure I'll just sit back and see what develops. I didn't like Succession when it first started and now I am a huge fan.

But then they use some kind ofAimee Semple Mcpherson clone, complete with hovering mama to introduce an element of corruption into the plot that is just such an obvious kick at the perceived disingenuous nature of organized religion , even if it was 90 years ago.

And they have Paul Drake as a beat cop. What's next, Della Street as The Flying Nun? Or maybe she'll just pick up a light saber and discover she has magical powers overnight. This is a take it or leave it proposition. The mystery is somewhat intriguing, but I can do without the brassy blonde megachurch matron reenacting Washington crossing the Delaware (or whatever that was)  to her enthralled parishioners.

Also realize that this series is very "woke", but at least the situations and relationships that are depicted here could have happened, even back in the 1930s. The character I like best is Paul Drake, playing an African American cop in 1931, who knows he has evidence that can change the course of the murder investigation, but he is being pressured by higher ups to keep mum. So he has to weigh his conscience on one side with the fact that he has a very good job for a black man in 1931, and his wife is expecting a child. I'd watch this show with more interest if it was more about him.  5/10 so far, but I could change my mind if the next 5 episodes improve. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Murder Is My Beat aka Danger Is My Beat has a terrible script and is a lesser known Ulmer film but there's something about it that I found compelling. It was Barbara Payton's last movie. She doesn't get much screen  time even though she's the main character. 

murder is my beat.jpg

MURDERISMYBEAT.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LsDoorMat said:

So I've been watching "Perry Mason" on HBO and trying to find some redeeming value in it. . Does Perry own a razor or an iron? Because the actual Perry Mason wouldn't be caught dead so habitually and poorly groomed. And then when the series starts I go, OK, so they messed up when they took the dapper attorney and turn him into a film noir era PI except these are the 1930s. So I figure I'll just sit back and see what develops. I didn't like Succession when it first started and now I am a huge fan.

But then they use some kind ofAimee Semple Mcpherson clone, complete with hovering mama to introduce an element of corruption into the plot that is just such an obvious kick at the perceived disingenuous nature of organized religion , even if it was 90 years ago.

And they have Paul Drake as a beat cop. What's next, Della Street as The Flying Nun? Or maybe she'll just pick up a light saber and discover she has magical powers overnight. This is a take it or leave it proposition. The mystery is somewhat intriguing, but I can do without the brassy blonde megachurch matron reenacting Washington crossing the Delaware (or whatever that was)  to her enthralled parishioners.

Also realize that this series is very "woke", but at least the situations and relationships that are depicted here could have happened, even back in the 1930s. The character I like best is Paul Drake, playing an African American cop in 1931, who knows he has evidence that can change the course of the murder investigation, but he is being pressured by higher ups to keep mum. So he has to weigh his conscience on one side with the fact that he has a very good job for a black man in 1931, and his wife is expecting a child. I'd watch this show with more interest if it was more about him.  5/10 so far, but I could change my mind if the next 5 episodes improve. 

I haven't watched the new Perry Mason and probably won't, but my wife did and I caught bits and pieces as I walked through the den.  My wife is a big fan of Burr's PM and after watching the Matthew Rhys version did not have much good to say about it.

I thoroughly enjoyed Rhys in The Americans, but can't see him as Perry Mason.

The Warren Williams PM's are OK and really like the Raymond Burr PM.  Williams versions are a little too humorous, but probably closer to the books.  Of course, Burr's are based on the books but sanitized for 1950's TV.  I especially like the Paul Drake character.

I did read one of the PM books, but did not like it that much.  Perry and Drake  were fairly sleazy in most of the book.  May have to read another one.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Castle on the Hudson (1940)

If you put Garfield and Cagney in a film together, no one else would be able to get a line in. I’ve only seen two Garfield films now, but it’s clear that he was one of the finest actors of his generation. Looking through his films, it’s fascinating how often he is first billed early in his career. There are a few more early Garfield films floating around on TCM onDemand, so I might check those out next. I’ve been on a 50s-80s kick lately, so it was nice to jump back into the real classic Hollywood era.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't seen I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING '45 since my initial viewing several years ago. I watched it again last night and enjoyed it even more than I remembered. It's a Powell/Pressberger movie-I should have known- it has the perfect balance of story, sentiment & visual impact. A huge P/P fan now, I was unfamiliar with their tremendous body of work when seeing this movie the first time.

It's the story of a headstrong young lady Joan Webster (Wendy Hiller) who is traveling to a remote island in Scotland to marry a wealthy industrialist. It is very unclear whether she loves this man or has even met him before, because her feelings are not expressed, it's very matter-of-fact. Traveling along with her is a military officer also trying to get the remote island, to spend his furlough with his family.

True to Scotland, harsh weather prevents the last leg of travel and they wait it out in Tobermory*.  They walk along the ruins of a castle (extant) that carries a legend/curse that becomes theme to the story. They make it to the next leg of the journey & stay at a wonderful hotel (extant) and attend a Gaelic homespun party.

4d1bf-johnlaurie-iknowwherei.jpg

The charactors are starting to fall for each other, so Joan stays with friends of her fiancé's in a gorgeous estate home. There she meets more enchanting people and we get more Scottish atmosphere. One of the residents is a very young Petula Clark!

3219-9111.jpg

960__i_know_where_im_going_X06_blu-ray__

6198749230_a9d1be0885.jpg

All these places & charactors add to the couple's story and especially to Joan's realization of what is truly important in life. I had to include a few screen caps of the sumptuous locations, sets & photography that visually tell the story.

Wendy+Hiller++waiting+-+I+Know+Where+I'm

OK, so we all know how the story will end. Powell & Pressberger (as usual) add delicious spice to the ending to keep it from being corny or trite & then tie it up in a bow revealing the legend of the castle curse.

Well, I know where I'm going once we can travel again....

Moy_Castle_on_Mull_-_geograph.org.uk_-_3

*Tobermory is a favorite Scotch, but I'm out. Talisker Storm is my appropriate substitute for this movie. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I hadn't seen I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING '45 since my initial viewing several years ago. I watched it again last night and enjoyed it even more than I remembered. It's a Powell/Pressberger movie-I should have known- it has the perfect balance of story, sentiment & visual impact. A huge P/P fan now, I was unfamiliar with their tremendous body of work when seeing this movie the first time.

 

Wendy+Hiller++waiting+-+I+Know+Where+I'm

I can't remember how long it has been since I saw this movie the first time, but on my initial viewing I did not know what entirely to make of it. I am pretty sure I saw it raw and un-restored and the print was bad and the sound was tinny, and that definitely impacted the viewing.

But the second time I saw it, I "got it"- (surely the print and sound have been cleaned up digitally by now...?)

makes a great companion film to WHISKEY GALORE or THE WICKER MAN.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

If you put Garfield and Cagney in a film together, no one else would be able to get a line in. I’ve only seen two Garfield films now, but it’s clear that he was one of the finest actors of his generation. Looking through his films, it’s fascinating how often he is first billed early in his career.

That would have been one interesting team-up, Garfield and Cagney.

Yes, indeed, John Garfield was a very fine actor whose career, like many others, was unjustly derailed by the HUAC witch-hunt.

My personal favorite performances of his have always been THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE and THE BREAKING POINT.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the review of "I Know Were I'm Going,"  TikiSoo.  I've only seen it once, a few years ago, but when it was over I felt like I was waking up after a wonderful dream.  I went on line and found some beautiful versions of the title song to put me back in the mood.

Another Garfield fan here. Nobody  plays opposite his female stars like Garfield.  He and Lana Turner almost set my screen on fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE VIKINGS (1958)  My brother's favorite movie, I avoided it for years but saw parts of it.  Suddenly, I appreciated the protracted siege and understood why my nearly 10 years older brother liked to play with my MARX Knights and Vikings playset...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Trapeze and found the backstory about Tony Curtis (Bernie Schwartz (sp?) very interesting.  I never realized how "traumatic" his family life was.  For some reasons, I felt like there was something going on between Burt's and Tony's characters (slightly romantic) even though Gina L. comes between them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I watched Trapeze and found the backstory about Tony Curtis (Bernie Schwartz (sp?) very interesting.  I never realized how "traumatic" his family life was.  For some reasons, I felt like there was something going on between Burt's and Tony's characters (slightly romantic) even though Gina L. comes between them.

That's what hinted at, all right, and at the time they couldn't do more than hint. The love triangle goes in every direction, and all three stars look great in their skintight costumes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

But the second time I saw it, I "got it"- (surely the print and sound have been cleaned up digitally by now...?)

makes a great companion film to WHISKEY GALORE or THE WICKER MAN.

This is a Criterion release, it looked & sounded great. Check your library.

I agree I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING has a similar feel/setting as WHISKEY GALORE '49 (a favorite)...but The Wicker Man '73? While I liked that movie ok, I don't see much of a connection.

I was reminded more of Michael Powell's EDGE OF THE WORLD '37 making a perfect double feature with this, then add WHISKEY GALORE for a bonnie Scottish Triple Feature. 

4515576088.jpg

(the castle ruins ^^^ is shown in the upper right horizon of the box landscape painting, reassuring that not much changes)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I felt like there was something going on between Burt's and Tony's characters (slightly romantic) even though Gina L. comes between them.

...I didn't think even I was sexy enough to make a gay man straight, dahling...."

34c20d8a576abd2bd05d3f479a5798be--gina-l

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kingrat said:

That's what hinted at, all right, and at the time they couldn't do more than hint.

In the book "The Films Of The Fifties" author Douglas Brode said "Essentially, Trapeze is a celebration of how wonderful a masculine relationship can be-until a woman comes along and spoils it."

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

This is a Criterion release, it looked & sounded great. Check your library.

I agree I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING has a similar feel/setting as WHISKEY GALORE '49 (a favorite)...but The Wicker Man '73? While I liked that movie ok, I don't see much of a connection.

I was reminded more of Michael Powell's EDGE OF THE WORLD '37 making a perfect double feature with this, then add WHISKEY GALORE for a bonnie Scottish Triple Feature. 

4515576088.jpg

(the castle ruins ^^^ is shown in the upper right horizon of the box landscape painting, reassuring that not much changes)

THE WICKER MAN also takes place (like WHISKEY GALORE) on the Scottish Islands The Hebrides (I am pretty sure) And from both stories you get a sense of social isolation and living in a society at the edge of the world. (Just very different end results)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a pretty good film starring Burt Lancaster and Peter Riegert (whom I watched in The Mask last night) called Local Hero that took place in Scotland.

On a side note, personally, especially when a star is not around to defend his or herself, I do not think their sexuality should be an issue.  Burt Lancaster was supposedly gay (only recently heard of this), however, whether he was or wasn't doesn't stop me from thinking he was a sexy, good looking, seemingly nice actor.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

There was a pretty good film starring Burt Lancaster and Peter Riegert (whom I watched in The Mask last night) called Local Hero that took place in Scotland.

On a side note, personally, especially when a star is not around to defend his or herself, I do not think their sexuality should be an issue.  Burt Lancaster was supposedly gay (only recently heard of this), however, whether he was or wasn't doesn't stop me from thinking he was a sexy, good looking, seemingly nice actor.

I've heard the rumors myself over the years that Burt was supposedly bi-sexual, but what he did in his private life was his own business. He was and still is considered one of the best actors of all time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...