Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

I would have loved to see Yul in the Broadway version of The King and I.  Thought he was the best thing about Westworld.  I cried when Yul died in The King and I (I thought he made a better King then Rex Harrison, though both were good).  When my Mom lived in either Philly or NYC, a friend of hers saw Yul Brynner on Broadway in Lute Song.  She said he was gorgeous.  Yul is also one of the best things in The Ten Commandments.

As for what I watched last night, Fried Green Tomatoes (don't like all the commercial interruptions on Ovation), and then I started Shall We Dance because I like Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, Anita Gillette, Stanley Tucci, and Jennifer Lopez was okay.  Wish they would have put Captain Newman before Some Like It Hot.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Journey (1959)

I almost certain that most people could pick Yul Brynner out of a crowd, but outside of Westworld I hadn’t actually seen another Brynner film. Out of the selection of his films that TCM recently aired, this one looked the most interesting to me, so I just had to watch it. I had seen Deborah Kerr in a few other films and I wasn’t very impressed, but Kerr and Brynner put in two really good performances in this Cold War romance/drama. However, the film didn’t wow me. I didn’t hate it either, but something was missing. I felt like nothing really happened and there wasn’t much tension throughout. When everything starts to kick in, the film ends. The acting and setting were great, but the story left me wanting something more. I would give this film a chance if you haven’t seen it yet. 

 

11 hours ago, SadPanda said:

Well, it's hard to imagine a more lukewarm recommendation than that, but....

Aside from a fine performance by Brynner, the movie is well worth seeing for Jason Robards Jr'.s film debut.

I think it's a worthy film, but audiences of the time weren't drawn to it much. It lost money, as many fine movies do.

And contrary to what YourManGodfrey thought of it, I've always thought director Litvak ratcheted up the tension very nicely in this film as the story unfolded.

I first stumbled across it about ten years ago on TCM, and it hooked me from its very beginning and all the way through to its fatalistic finale.

I also thought every actor in it did great work, but yes especially Brynner. I thought his Soviet officer role was well fleshed out and multi-dimensional, and whereas it could have just been performed far less so and just as your standard villain type. 

(...and ironically, the role I felt was the least believable was the one played by Jason Robards Jr. as the Hungarian resistance fighter, but primarily because I felt him miscast in that role and that an actual European actor should have been used)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally watched a film that's been on my list for a long time.   Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened is a documentary by Lonny Price about the creation and subsequent failure of the Stephen Sondheim/Hal Prince 1981 musical Merrily We Roll Along.   The musical's production had a few aspects that probably contributed to its demise,  having only 16 performances before it closed.  For one, the story was told in reverse, and supposedly was so confusing that Prince swapped out costumes for sweatshirts that had the characters' names or defining characteristic emblazoned across the front, in the hopes that the audience could figure out who was who.  Additionally, the cast consisted of mostly newcomers, aged 16 to 25 (including Lonny Price),  and as the play shows their reverse arc from middle age to high school graduates it was felt by some that the actors couldn't pull off the illusion that they were 25 years older than they really were.  

The film itself was interesting for anyone wanting to see how they go about creating, casting and rehearsing a big Broadway production.  The film follows about a half dozen of the original cast members, some of whom are household names (Jason Alexander), some less so, perhaps, depending on the household (Lonny Price), and some who were scarred enough by the experience that they left show business entirely. 

It is not, however, just a backstage documentary.  It's about youthful enthusiasm at its zenith, having your dreams dashed virtually overnight (watching the theater empty in the middle of a performance), and coping with the aftermath.   Nearly everyone can relate to this on some level.

8/10 for me.  I would have preferred a bit more backstory on some of the lesser-known cast members.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Journey (1959)

I almost certain that most people could pick Yul Brynner out of a crowd, but outside of Westworld I hadn’t actually seen another Brynner film. Out of the selection of his films that TCM recently aired, this one looked the most interesting to me, so I just had to watch it. I had seen Deborah Kerr in a few other films and I wasn’t very impressed, but Kerr and Brynner put in two really good performances in this Cold War romance/drama. However, the film didn’t wow me. I didn’t hate it either, but something was missing. I felt like nothing really happened and there wasn’t much tension throughout. When everything starts to kick in, the film ends. The acting and setting were great, but the story left me wanting something more. I would give this film a chance if you haven’t seen it yet. 

Please go find the original version of THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. It's my favorite Brynner film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Magnificent Seven isn't too hard to find - TCM seems to play it every other week.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

Please go find the original version of THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. It's my favorite Brynner film.

Have always thought it one of the better Hollywood re-dos of a foreign film, ever.

I still remember watching it as an 8 y/o with my parents and when it first hit the theaters in '60, and one of the things that still sticks with me from that experience was when Brynner removes his cowboy hat to wipe his brow and some of the tittering that then came from a few of the audience members at seeing his bald head.

(...guess at the time they didn't expect to see an old west character sportin' a chrome dome)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Have always thought it one of the better Hollywood re-dos of a foreign film, ever.

I still remember watching it as a 8 y/o with my parents and when it first hit the theaters in '60, and one of the things that still sticks with me was when Brynner removes his cowboy hat to wipe his brow and some of the tittering that then came from a few of the audience members at seeing his bald head.

(...guess at the time they didn't expect to see an old west character sportin' a chrome dome)

You mean "a titter ran through the crowd"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Swithin said:

You mean "a titter ran through the crowd"?

LOL

Actually as I recall, it was more of a slow jog. 

(...and come to think of it, it's probably a very good thing that John Sturges directed it, and 'cause if William Castle had, there would've  probably been a very good chance that an ACTUAL "titter" just might have been set up to do just THAT!)  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like: The Journey (1959) very much.  My favorite role by Yul Brynner is:  Baron Von Grunen in: Triple Cross (1966). He is not a lead in the movie but his character is very intense. He does at all times what is best even when it is at his expense. His failing infuriates him. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Swithin said:

"a titter ran through the crowd"

Really? What was her name?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

Really? What was her name?

Mildred.

(...although she IS quite often mistaken for her sister Hortense...the resemblance is astonishing, and they're not even twins)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Dargo said:

Mildred.

(...although she IS quite often mistaken for her sister Hortense...the resemblance is astonishing, and they're not even twins)

Do you know how to make a Hortense?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Swithin said:

You mean "a titter ran through the crowd"?

Was it related to:

FepeymM.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

Do you know how to make a Hortense?

Uh-huh. Isn't the old punchline somethin' like: By withholding her payment for services rendered  ???  ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Was it related to:

FepeymM.jpg

Hello Dali!

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Please go find the original version of THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN.

[looks for The Seven Samurai...]

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Dargo said:
23 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

Really? What was her name?

Mildred.

mildred-pierce-body.jpg

Mildred....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

SansFin - that is way weird. Way.

That is likely a solid 7/10 for 'unusual' of the images which I have collected but it is likely also as strange as it might be able to post with some hope that the Moderator will not immediately delete it and admonish or ban me. I would take 'warning points' and/or a ban as very personal because either would mean that I lack the finesse to tip-toe upon the line between good and bad with no one being able to objectively state I was wrong in posting a thing. I would greatly detest myself if it was proven that I am an oaf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Fedya said:

mildred-pierce-body.jpg

Mildred....

No, that's a different "Mildred".

Here's the one I was speakin' of earlier...

GettyImages-162722625_Mildred%20Natwick.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, SansFin said:

the line between good and bad with no one being able to objectively state I was wrong in posting a thing. 

In today's world, that's getting to be a taller order by the minute.

Quote

I would greatly detest myself if it was proven that I am an oaf.

A smart attitude. It can be a long, lonely road for an oaf that has lost its home.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Finally watched a film that's been on my list for a long time.   Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened is a documentary by Lonny Price about the creation and subsequent failure of the Stephen Sondheim/Hal Prince 1981 musical Merrily We Roll Along.   The musical's production had a few aspects that probably contributed to its demise,  having only 16 performances before it closed.  For one, the story was told in reverse, and supposedly was so confusing that Prince swapped out costumes for sweatshirts that had the characters' names or defining characteristic emblazoned across the front, in the hopes that the audience could figure out who was who.  Additionally, the cast consisted of mostly newcomers, aged 16 to 25 (including Lonny Price),  and as the play shows their reverse arc from middle age to high school graduates it was felt by some that the actors couldn't pull off the illusion that they were 25 years older than they really were.  

I remember the fuss about the play when it opened--The main problem is that it was, as one critic put it, "The most expensive college-musical ever produced", which is why it's gone on to have a successful second-life with...college theater groups.

Watching the documentary, I also surprised to learn that one of the musical's only Acting Tony nominations gave the first break to an ambitious young Broadway newcomer named Jason Alexander.  

1 hour ago, SansFin said:

I would greatly detest myself if it was proven that I am an oaf.

"Stop it!...OAF!!"

15thumb.jpg

2 hours ago, Fedya said:

[looks for The Seven Samurai...]

(rubs head) Takashi Shimura's good, but he's no Yul Brynner...Just try picturing Shimura in Westworld.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE KID (1921)

I watched this again last night.  It still makes me laugh, and I love the happy ending. 

Chaplin_The_Kid_2_crop.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mouse That Roared (1959)

As one of the great military strategists of his time, I was happy to see that a film was dedicated to Field Marshal Tully Bascomb. This biopic focuses exclusively on Bascomb’s late 1950s war service that made him into a worldwide celebrity. If you’re looking for a more full picture of his life, I would skip this one. However, if you’re looking for a great, blood and guts war film that makes Saving Private Ryan look like Singing in the Rain, look no further than The Mouse That Roared, which features noted actor Peter Sellers in the role of The Field Marshal. And the Prime Minister. And the Duchess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Mouse That Roared (1959)

As one of the great military strategists of his time, I was happy to see that a film was dedicated to Field Marshal Tully Bascomb. This biopic focuses exclusively on Bascomb’s late 1950s war service that made him into a worldwide celebrity. If you’re looking for a more full picture of his life, I would skip this one. However, if you’re looking for a great, blood and guts war film that makes Saving Private Ryan look like Singing in the Rain, look no further than The Mouse That Roared, which features noted actor Peter Sellers in the role of The Field Marshal. And the Prime Minister. And the Duchess.

In this movie, a news anchor related the following item: "The New York Yankees defeated the Milwaukee Braves, 6-2, to win the World Series." This was a childhood trauma for me. Not sure if i can stomach that part. The anchor made a face as if to think, "How did that news item get in there?" I have a vague idea that he did that because there was something anachronistic about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...