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21 hours ago, rosebette said:

I just tried to watch the new Perry Mason  on HBO, which apparently is extremely popular and has been renewed.   I wasn't a huge fan of the TV series with Raymond Burr, but I thought the new series might be closer to the original intent.   

 

The TV series with Raymond Burr is about as close to the author's original intent as any adaptation has ever been. Erle Stanley Gardner selected Raymond Burr, who had previously been mostly cast as villains. William Hopper as Paul Drake, Barbara Hale as Della Street, Ray Collins as Lt. Tragg, William Talman as Hamilton Burger, are just like the characters in the novels. The very first Perry Mason books, like The Case of the Velvet Claws, are slightly more hard-boiled than the subsequent ones, with the world of speakeasies, but only slightly. The early books also have Sgt. Holcomb, the bad and blustering cop who wants to beat the truth out of every suspect, with Lt. Tragg as the smarter, more reasonable and honest cop, but Holcomb fades out as the series continues. Lt. Tragg is actually a more formidable opponent. The new HBO series wants to pull in viewers by using a familiar title while having minimal connection to the alleged source material. Perry Mason never had an "origin story" in Gardner's books. Gardner mentions in one of the early books that Della Street had come from an upper-crust family that lost its money in the crash of 1929, but that never figures into any of the stories.

By the way, if you are ever in downtown Ventura, CA, you can walk by the law office where Erle Stanley Gardner practiced law before he became a famous writer. There's a recording of the Perry Mason theme.

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Young Mr. Jazz (1919)

I’m going to assume that the score was reworked,  but that is the high point of this film for me. The final “brawl in the hall” is entertaining, but the rest isn’t the best. The rhyming won’t cost you extra. However, it’s a 10 minute Harold Lloyd short, so it’s worth watching anyway.

His Royal Slyness (1920)

Another Hal Roach-directed Lloyd short that is an improvement over the above film. Again, the score is the real high point. I found myself tapping my foot and bouncing around to the music as Lloyd finds himself in a case of mistaken(?) identity in a foreign kingdom. 
 

I’m taking advantage of the large collection of Harold Lloyd films that Criterion has available. It would be nice if they got access to other silent comedians like Langdon and Linder. 

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I had ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD on hold at my library before lockdown and just received it....as usual coming late to the party. Since it was already talked about here ad nauseam, there's only a few things I'd like to add:

As someone who was around (a teen) during this time period, I found all the extra attention to place setting, hair and especially the costuming absolutely outstanding. You know a lot of time, effort & expense was put into every scene for authenticity. I hope the production staff was duly honored. WOW

I also found all of the performances outstanding. I'm finally a Leonardo fan and most definitely a Brad Pitt fan-not just a pretty face. The hippies were also excellently portrayed. The most wonderful scene is Sharon Tate watching her new movie in a theater and hearing patron's reactions-brilliant!

I cannot deal with violence which often leaves out great filmmakers like Scorcese & Tarantino. Knowing the story revolved around Sharon Tate & the Manson ranch of hippies (I'm an old hippie, btw) I figured when the ending came, I'd just fast forward through it, since most on this board talked favorably about this movie.

I had MrTiki preview it and he said "the ending is not what you're expecting and you should be able to handle it" Braced & ready the ending was completely surprising. Yes, there was crazy violence shown but thankfully rather absurd almost laughable like a schlocky horror movie - THANK YOU!

FINALLY a Quenten Tarantino movie I can enjoy. This movie was beautifully written & photographed, obviously Tarantino's vision. Loved it!

9350_6764.jpg

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

I had ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD on hold at my library before lockdown and just received it....as usual coming late to the party. Since it was already talked about here ad nauseam, there's only a few things I'd like to add:

As someone who was around (a teen) during this time period, I found all the extra attention to place setting, hair and especially the costuming absolutely outstanding. You know a lot of time, effort & expense was put into every scene for authenticity. I hope the production staff was duly honored. WOW

I also found all of the performances outstanding. I'm finally a Leonardo fan and most definitely a Brad Pitt fan-not just a pretty face. The hippies were also excellently portrayed. The most wonderful scene is Sharon Tate watching her new movie in a theater and hearing patron's reactions-brilliant!

I cannot deal with violence which often leaves out great filmmakers like Scorcese & Tarantino. Knowing the story revolved around Sharon Tate & the Manson ranch of hippies (I'm an old hippie, btw) I figured when the ending came, I'd just fast forward through it, since most on this board talked favorably about this movie.

I had MrTiki preview it and he said "the ending is not what you're expecting and you should be able to handle it" Braced & ready the ending was completely surprising. Yes, there was crazy violence shown but thankfully rather absurd almost laughable like a schlocky horror movie - THANK YOU!

FINALLY a Quenten Tarantino movie I can enjoy. This movie was beautifully written & photographed, obviously Tarantino's vision. Loved it!

9350_6764.jpg

TikiSoo, I'm so glad you enjoyed Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.  I saw it last summer when it came out, and I loved it.  But then, I am a Quentin Tarantino fan ever since 1994  (when Pulp Fiction came out.)I agree with all you say about it. (OUATIH).    I too was a young teenager around the time the film is set, and I also loved the accuracy and attention to detail around clothes, sets, cars, etc.  Oh, and music, of course.  It was one of those movies you could call  "a wild ride",  fun, exciting, and also oddly moving.  I thought the scene in which Leonardo CiCaprio's character starts to cry (on his film set) was both sad and funny at the same time. I love it when that happens.

Now that you've seen a Q.T. movie and liked it, maybe you could try Pulp Fiction.  It's one of my favourite films, period.  I actually watched it again (I think for the 4th or 5th time) a week or two ago, with my husband and 26 year old son, who'd never seen it before.  I was really interested in whether my son would like it or not --- if he hadn't, I would have been really disappointed.  But he thought it was great !  Honestly, TikiSoo,  it's a smart, funny, entertaining movie, and also one that assumes its audience is intelligent. Also, there are all kinds of in jokes that only real movie lovers would pick up on.  Your kind of movie??  Give it a shot  (no pun intended ! )

edit:  It just struck me that maybe you've already seen Pulp Fiction at some point, maybe a while ago, and didn't like it because of the violence.  I will just say, I realized when I watched it quite recently that it is in fact not nearly as violent as everyone thinks.  I had always thought of it as a violent film too. But on this last viewing, it struck me that it gives the impression of a lot of violence more than it actually shows.  Not to say there aren't some gory scenes in it- for sure, there are.  But not as many as people think.   And it's such a good movie, whatever gore it has is worth putting up with  (maybe fast forward?) for the fun of seeing the film.

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58 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

As someone who was around (a teen) during this time period, I found all the extra attention to place setting, hair and especially the costuming absolutely outstanding. You know a lot of time, effort & expense was put into every scene for authenticity. I hope the production staff was duly honored. WOW

I also found all of the performances outstanding. I'm finally a Leonardo fan and most definitely a Brad Pitt fan-not just a pretty face. The hippies were also excellently portrayed. The most wonderful scene is Sharon Tate watching her new movie in a theater and hearing patron's reactions-brilliant!

So glad you liked it. It has become not only my favorite movie of last year but my favorite of the 21st century. 

I was only 8 years old in 1969 but it took me back to the days of watching shows like Mannix or The FBI on TV and hearing Deep Purple or Paul Revere & The Raiders on the radio. The scenes of filming TV shows at the time were fascinating to me such as where DiCaprio works with the little girl Method actor. I loved the Sharon Tate movie theater scene, it was a great tribute to her, most people only know her as a famous murder victim, but she was actually a very kind and positive person. 

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I loved “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” and I’m not normally a Quentin Tarantino fan (I’m thinking maybe I need to re-watch some of his other films). I did not grow up in that era, in 1969, my parents were only 7 & 8. However, having seen movies and television from that time, I had an idea, aesthetically, how it should look, and Tarantino did a great job. 

I am very familiar with the Manson murders however and I dreaded the ending every time gorgeous Sharon Tate was shown onscreen. I was very pleasantly surprised by the ending. 

When I first started watching the movie, I was dreading the runtime. I was pleasantly surprised that I didn’t look at the clock once! 

And Brad Pitt... yowza!

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I have not seen ONCE UPON...but I have probably only seen a dozen or so movies made since 2008, and one of the few Out of that dozen or so that I really really really really really liked was DJANGO UNCHAINED. 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have not seen ONCE UPON...but I have probably only seen a dozen or so movies made since 2008, and one of the few Out of that dozen or so that I really really really really really liked was DJANGO UNCHAINED. 

I actually watched quite a few from 2019—Motherless Brooklyn, Little Women, Once Upon..., Jojo Rabbit, and Judy. Once Upon... and Jojo were my favorites. 

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22 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I actually watched quite a few from 2019—Motherless Brooklyn, Little Women, Once Upon..., Jojo Rabbit, and Judy. Once Upon... and Jojo were my favorites. 

🎶JoJo was a man who thought he was a rabbit...🎶

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

It just struck me that maybe you've already seen Pulp Fiction at some point, maybe a while ago, and didn't like it because of the violence. 

Yes, I've seen it twice actually. 2nd time I just couldn't get into it. Thanks for recommending it though.

I'm not a big fan of swearing either which often ruins my enjoyment of Cohen Bros films - just an old fuddy duddy.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

🎶JoJo was a man who thought he was a rabbit...🎶

Jojo Rabbit, Your Life Is Calling....

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I actually watched quite a few from 2019—Motherless Brooklyn, Little Women, Once Upon..., Jojo Rabbit, and Judy. Once Upon... and Jojo were my favorites. 

I saw 37 films from last year, and there are still a few more i would like to see (Dark Waters, A Hidden Life,  Ad Astra, The Goldfinch, etc). But as it stands, here is how I ranked things.

https://letterboxd.com/bcarr95/list/2019/

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2 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I like Brad Pitt but Manson still gives me nightmares.  Have HBO so I will be able to see Jo Jo Rabbit.

The person who plays Manson has less than two minutes of screentime in a 161 minute film. His followers are seen more often than he is.

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24 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

The person who plays Manson has less than two minutes of screentime in a 161 minute film. His followers are seen more often than he is.

As it should be. Manson was a **** and his followers were nitwits. I think pretty much every single person they killed was a result of mistaken identity.

Although Squeaky did get close to Gerald Ford...

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40 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

As it should be. Manson was a **** and his followers were nitwits. I think pretty much every single person they killed was a result of mistaken identity.

Although Squeaky did get close to Gerald Ford...

Gerald Ford must have had some sort of complex after two women tried to kill him within a month.

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

Who was the other? 

Squeaky tried to kill Ford on September 5, 1975 in Sacramento. Sara Jane Moore then tried to make a hit on him in San Francisco on September 22, 1975. The mark of Moore's bullets is still in the stone facade of the St Francis Hotel to this day.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

As it should be. Manson was a **** and his followers were nitwits. I think pretty much every single person they killed was a result of mistaken identity.

Although Squeaky did get close to Gerald Ford...

I heard that their original target was Terry Melcher, Doris Day’s son. I believe he owned (or used to own) the infamous house. 

Im a true crime junkie, so I probably know more about this than I should. 

One of his followers, I think Leslie VanHouten, is trying to get parole again. She should rot as far as I’m concerned. 

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On 7/24/2020 at 1:14 PM, CinemaInternational said:

It's been a bit of an oddball day. This afternoon, I saw most of The Big Trees on demand which was pretty good, and I stayed up late last night for the oddball pairing of A Dream of Kings and Who'll Stop the Rain. The former with Anthony Quinn was very well acted by him, Irene Papas, and Inger Stevens and was a very moving story, but, being a 1969 film, it made some odd moves to "juice" it up with being provocative. I didn't need to see Anthony Quinn in only briefs or to hear him give a sex talk to a 14 year old boy around a certain solitary sexual activity. If it hadn't been for those scenes it could have been a 9; it will have to settle for an 8. And Who'll Stop the Rain has to be one of the more explicit films that I've ever seen on TCM. The language is very rough for a 1978 film, and given the subject matter (involving Nick Nolte, Tuesday Weld, and Michael Moriarty caught up in a drug carrying deal), it should come as no surprise that there are many graphic scenes of drug abuse, all presented unflinchingly. I watched it for Weld, and she delivered with an absolutely stunning performance.

Glad you got to see A Dream of Kings. I agree about the excellent performances. It's well worth seeing. I did not like Who'll Stop the Rain when it first came out and have never wanted to see it again. Tuesday Weld was, as you indicated, the best thing about it. You do get to see a brief glimpse of Nick Nolte frontally naked; Michael Moriarty (usually a fine actor) delivers a below par performance, though I wouldn't have wanted to see him tortured for it; and I did not care for the cheaply cynical ending.

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A Day’s Pleasure (1919)

This is my favorite Chaplin film I have seen so far. Not only are the gags well done, but his slight facial expressions and overall acting really make the film. This is one of the better silent shorts I have seen.

Death Drums Along the River (1963)

I felt that the overall story was not explored at enough depth. Conclusions were seemingly pulled out of thin air and the film could have been at least another 30 minutes longer. Richard Todd plays his part brilliantly and the on-site locations are absolutely stunning. Give this one a go if you like African adventure films, mystery films, or both! 

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I've discussed this before on these boards and found myself alone in my chief criticism of ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD: (SPOILER ALERT) the  violence committed by Brad Pitt against a woman whom he beats into a pulpy mass. She is quickly completely defenceless as he then proceeds to beat her to death. It's not so much the violence (admittedly, it's so over the top that it's almost cartoony) as it is seeing macho man Pitt perform it against a young woman.

Yes, she's one of the Manson psychos but, as of the moment of her death in the film, the only violence she has actually done had been to stab Pitt in the hip or leg (and even then it was half by accident, as she looked as surprised by it as he was). Not enough had happened in the film as of that point to justify the violence of her death (by a "good" guy for whom the audience is supposed to cheer).

With all the praise coming from posters here for Tarantino's film I don't see any pointing out this scene for condemnation of the violence against a woman. Aside from that scene, yes, I liked the film, with Pitt's performance, along with the period detail, the highlights for me.

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Office Wife (1930) Lawrence Fellowes (Lewis Stone) , the boss, hires a writer to come up with a story whereby a man (like him) might get more attention and support (as well as other things) from his secretary than from his wife. This sets the tone for the eternal pre-code triangle of Boss, Secretary, and Wife. Anne Murdock (Dorothy MacKaill), the secretary, falls in love the boss in an oft pre-code convention of the May-December romance. But it takes a long time to get there. Anne is promoted and becomes his secretary but is crestfallen at the news that he is getting married soon. After that happens, the new Mrs Fellowes wastes no time in having an affair. Will this open the door for Ann?

Dorothy Mackaill is all charm. A striking contrast to that other film she made, Safe in Hell, whereby she seems to be in dire peril the entire story. She is forced to be at a sort of island halfway house of gaping men. She is better off here and we get endless montage of cutesy facial expressions and sweet gestures, showcasing after as fashion all the delights and non-delights that might represent a young woman's thoughts. She has a flair for gazing seemingly no where in particular in a lovelorn stupor.

She lives with her sister, Katherine, played by Joan Blondell in her very first talkie. Boy, they knew they had something here. She takes a bath, gets dressed, putting on garters with suggestive but innocent flair as she talks girl-talk with Anne . She was selected to offer the biggest helping of cheesecake, though all done as delectably as can be. She is another charmer as would certainly be expected. 

Lewis Stone was excellent. He was reserved and respectful (for a pre-code anyway) and has by golly a charismatic appeal. I wouldn't have expected that. An actress named Natalie Moorhead as the wife who strays has a scene with her new husband where she realizes she's been found out.

Entertaining.

///

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Mister Roberts gives us the chance to see four great stars at different stages of their careers, and all four could scarcely be better. Jack Lemmon looks impossibly young and skinny and adorable and, oh yes, funny. If he's near the beginning of a long film career, William Powell is at the end of his and though the doctor seems weary, his quiet wisdom, irony, and kindness shine through. Like Powell, Henry Fonda is one of the best "acting is reacting" actors to be found. The smallest gesture, a look, an intonation, the thought we can see cross his face--never too much, always enough. Like Lemmon, James Cagney is a different kind of actor, livelier, more extroverted, more presentational. Because we like Cagney from his other films and because the captain is so full of energy, although usually misguided, he's comic, villainous, and serious in just the right proportions.

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