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5 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I think I recall reading that Fonda refused to make another film with Ford after Mr. Roberts.  I also remember reading that Fondahad words with Ford after Ford humiliated John Wayne on the set of Fort Apache.  Apparently, Ford made a practice of humiliating actors on sets and Fonda would have none of it.

The thing that's so hard to picture is Fonda throwing Ford across the room.

It just never seemed like he had that ability to me.

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Just enjoyed watching Pillow Talk again! When I was a pre-dating teenager watching it in the movie house with a friend, I would just watch it and dream of being Doris Day and meeting my Rock!  The romantic scenes are what I went for.  But now I realize the character actors' performances are what drive this movie.  Just anticipating  the comeback lines of Tony Randell makes me laugh before they hit.  "Well sir, it's not our place .. .".    "NO.. it's my place and I helped 'em pack!" or Perry Blackwell singing, "You lied, You Dog, and you'll be sorry" as Hudson is leaving the piano bar.  Oh, I love remembering sitting around a piano bar.  Then there is that fabulous bar scene of Thelma Ritter drinking Hudson under the table.  What a hoot.  

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

I think I recall reading that Fonda refused to make another film with Ford after Mr. Roberts.  I also remember reading that Fondahad words with Ford after Ford humiliated John Wayne on the set of Fort Apache.  Apparently, Ford made a practice of humiliating actors on sets and Fonda would have none of it.

Yet Wayne would go on to make some more movies with Ford, including THE SEARCHERS and THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE.

Sounds like Ford and Wayne had a love/hate relationship....can't recall though if they ever had a permanent fallout like Ford and Fonda did.

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17 hours ago, REDBIRD51 said:

Just enjoyed watching Pillow Talk again! When I was a pre-dating teenager watching it in the movie house with a friend, I would just watch it and dream of being Doris Day and meeting my Rock!  The romantic scenes are what I went for.  But now I realize the character actors' performances are what drive this movie.  Just anticipating  the comeback lines of Tony Randell makes me laugh before they hit.  "Well sir, it's not our place .. .".    "NO.. it's my place and I helped 'em pack!" or Perry Blackwell singing, "You lied, You Dog, and you'll be sorry" as Hudson is leaving the piano bar.  Oh, I love remembering sitting around a piano bar.  Then there is that fabulous bar scene of Thelma Ritter drinking Hudson under the table.  What a hoot.  

Agree it's a film that never gets old.  My favorite scene is Doris and Tony Randall in the diner with all the rough regulars listening in and thinking the cad who's making her cry is Tony.

I just watched "Susan and God," this morning.  I've seen it before and I love many things about it from all the dachshunds running wild in the opening scene to the sweet, warm ending -- however -- the dress  someone put Joan Crawford in for the long, final, dramatic scene is the single most ridiculous dress I've ever seen outside a circus.  WHAT were they thinking?

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Yesterday afternoon, watched a Thelma Ritter/Jeanne  Crain film the Model and the Marriage Broker and last night we watched an old Colombo (sp?) that took place in England.  It had Honor Blackman, Richard Basehart (sp?), John Williams, Wilfred Hyde-White among others.

Tonight, after Wheel/Jeopardy, I gave my Mom a choice of three films.  Not interested in Lady From Shanghai and they just showed it on Noir Alley.

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Last night, we settled on After Hours.  Weird movie that is both funny and sad.  Good cast, some of plot is unbelievable; however, having said that, anyone who has haunted Soho or some other neighborhoods in Manhattan in the after hours knows how strange it can be.

I admit it; I watch the soap opera General Hospital (though it is pretty dreadful now).  Yesterday, there were new episodes and I was surprised that, even if the actors tested negative for the virus, they didn't practice social distancing (on set).  

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19 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I admit it; I watch the soap opera General Hospital (though it is pretty dreadful now).

One of my oldest dearest friends works on that show. She has great things to say about the cast & crew.

Last night I watched HOPSCOTCH '80 catching up with TCM's recent broadcast. It was yet ANOTHER Ronald Neame movie-man that guy has a great filmography including every genre. 

It's the story of a CIA spy played by Walter Matthau, who gets coldly replaced & fired after years of successful work. Dangerous situation, as he has so many government secrets. The movie is his attempt at writing a tell-all book, then escaping undetected so he can retire with his long term gf played by the wonderful Glenda Jackson.

In fact, ALL the acting is superb and the story is well told with twists & turns you never quite follow until it all wraps up in the end. Gorgeous European locations add to the enjoyment, as well as very amusing comedic touches. For example, while typing his book, he speaks to a photo of his slime ball boss wonderfully played by Ned Beatty. With every sentence, the camera interchanges with a shot of the photo and the boss's expression changes from smiling to concern to horror! 

I don't want to reveal anything about the story. But if -like me-you don't get enough Matthau in a movie, this one is a true gem. A real WOW of an ending too. (available as a Criterion release)

Hopscotchposter.jpg

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TikiSoo:  The cast and crew of GH may be nice people but not necessarily good actors or writers.  Personally, I don't care for Kelly M. and prefer Liz with Jason.  I do not wish her any ill will and I'm glad she is feeling well enough to return to work.  My comment had to do with the morbidity and lack of humor in the show.  Personally, end of life decisions are not what I need now.  General Hospital was know for fun adventures during the summer (even if they were outlandish).

Last night, watched Jeopardy (and Wheel and Jeopardy are evidently going to begin taping new shows) and couldn't picture Brad from 20 years ago to Brad today (he is so much thinner).  After Jeopardy, HBO on Demand had Bee Season (based on a Myla Goldberg book).  Nothing to do with bees (I'm allergic).  Bee Season refers to spelling bees.  It is a sad but beautiful movie.  I remember reading the book and Richard Gere, Juliet Binoche, and the two actors playing the young girl and her brother were amazing.  One of the interesting things in the films is the young girl's almost otherworldly ability to visualize the words.

Have no idea what we'll watch today or tonight.

 

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Double Indemnity Poster

Double Indemnity (1944) TCM On Demand 9/10

An insurance salesman (Fred MacMurray) falls for a seductive woman (Barbara Stanwyck) who convinces him to murder her husband for the accident policy money.

This is the second time I have watched this all the way through. I have seen bits of it a few other times but you have to watch it from beginning to end to get the full effect. In addition to the great acting and engrossing plot, this has some of the snappiest dialogue in film noir history. I especially love the "Suppose you..." and "Suppose that..." scene between the two leads. This has all the great elements of noir, Stanwyck is the quintessential femme fatale and MacMurray the ultimate sap. Edward G Robinson steals a few scenes as the wily claims manager who suspects something is up. There has been much criticism of Stanwyck's blond wig but I think she should looks sexy in it. Then again I was always attracted to her, even after her hair went gray.  

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23 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Double Indemnity Poster

 There has been much criticism of Stanwyck's blond wig but I think she should looks sexy in it.

I think she looks tacky in it but maybe that was the point.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I think she looks tacky in it but maybe that was the point.

Billy Wilder wanted it to look fake.  She was playing a woman of dubious character with a past, after all, but we only learn this later in the film.  

Then there's the famous "George Washington" quote about the wig:

Buddy DeSylva, who was better known as a songwriter, supposedly quipped: "We hired Barbara Stanwyck and here we get George Washington."

 

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I just watched The Strawberry Blonde.  I was hoping it would be aired on Olivia deHavilland's night, but it turned up on Rita Hayworth night.  Although Rita's great in it as a high maintenance ice princess, I think Olivia steals the picture, although Alan Hale comes a close second.   The reunion scene between Biff and Amy brought a few tears to my eyes.   That DeHavilland's quiet steadfastness could hold its own in a scene with Cagney speaks for her acting ability.  The only thing is that I went to bed right afterwards and woke up with a toothache!  I wonder why.  

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

I think she looks tacky in it but maybe that was the point.

tumblr_oww5m0dytz1vi82uko5_500.gif

Like Kim Novak's frizzy burnt mullet in Picnic? Sorry, I want to see leading ladies beautiful.

1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

We hired Barbara Stanwyck and here we get George Washington."

Similar weirdo on Judy:

TrolleySmile.png

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

Last night I watched HOPSCOTCH '80 catching up with TCM's recent broadcast. It was yet ANOTHER Ronald Neame movie-man that guy has a great filmography including every genre. 

It's the story of a CIA spy played by Walter Matthau, who gets coldly replaced & fired after years of successful work. Dangerous situation, as he has so many government secrets. The movie is his attempt at writing a tell-all book, then escaping undetected so he can retire with his long term gf played by the wonderful Glenda Jackson.

Hopscotchposter.jpg

Tiki, I have watched Hopscotch several times and continue to find some surprises I missed the times before.  You are right about this movie satisfies the Matthau craving!!

 

 

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4 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

tumblr_oww5m0dytz1vi82uko5_500.gif

Like Kim Novak's frizzy burnt mullet in Picnic? Sorry, I want to see leading ladies beautiful.

Similar weirdo on Judy:

TrolleySmile.png

I don't think Kim has a true mullet, just bangs in the front and pulled back on the sides.     She may actually have had short hair (which she does in most of her pictures)  and a a fall piece was added to give length in the back.  I'm female, so maybe I'm no judge, but I don't think too many on this site would say that Kim doesn't look beautiful in Picnic.  Judy also doesn't have a mullet, but bangs and then the side hair pulled back.  Of course, it's a wig styled for the period.   I actually found Judy quite lovely in this film, especially in the Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas number, which turns me to mush.

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27 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I don't think Kim has a true mullet, just bangs in the front and pulled back on the sides.     She may actually have had short hair (which she does in most of her pictures)  and a a fall piece was added to give length in the back.  I'm female, so maybe I'm no judge, but I don't think too many on this site would say that Kim doesn't look beautiful in Picnic.

I don't think there are many people on planet Earth who would not call Kim Novak a beautiful woman in Picnic.

Momma mia - and I'm not even Italian!

 

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8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

One of my oldest dearest friends works on that show. She has great things to say about the cast & crew.

Last night I watched HOPSCOTCH '80 catching up with TCM's recent broadcast. It was yet ANOTHER Ronald Neame movie-man that guy has a great filmography including every genre. 

It's the story of a CIA spy played by Walter Matthau, who gets coldly replaced & fired after years of successful work. Dangerous situation, as he has so many government secrets. The movie is his attempt at writing a tell-all book, then escaping undetected so he can retire with his long term gf played by the wonderful Glenda Jackson.

In fact, ALL the acting is superb and the story is well told with twists & turns you never quite follow until it all wraps up in the end. Gorgeous European locations add to the enjoyment, as well as very amusing comedic touches. For example, while typing his book, he speaks to a photo of his slime ball boss wonderfully played by Ned Beatty. With every sentence, the camera interchanges with a shot of the photo and the boss's expression changes from smiling to concern to horror! 

I don't want to reveal anything about the story. But if -like me-you don't get enough Matthau in a movie, this one is a true gem. A real WOW of an ending too. (available as a Criterion release)

Hopscotchposter.jpg

 

I love this movie very much. The principals are professionals comfortable in their work and carry it out calmly and elegantly while the young and the wannabes rush around in a panic as if the sky is falling. The relationship between Matthau and Jackson parallels this in how so very comfortable and passionate they are with no overt wild actions or public spectacle necessary. It is obviously my mentally adding material not actually presented but I feel that in some way "gin and ginger ale" is a private joke between them from long ago that no other person would ever understand. 

Joe Cutter's last statement in the penultimate scene is absolute perfection! He is clearly mature in the realities of his work while retaining his humanity. Yaskov understands. Myerson never will.

 

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gerxNGF.jpg

Cynthia (1947)

Cynthia is a teen-ager who has been ill since birth. Her exact affliction is never disclosed. Suffice it to say if she so much wrinkles nose she is down with the flue or bad bad cold. Her parents and a relative who is a doctor are always looking at her and saying she looks pale and send her to bed. She thinks longingly what most teenagers want, to go steady, go to proms, go to dances, having a few friends, etc. She has one "friend" but she doesn't like her. Neither does mom. Mom calls her a name and they both have fun with that.  Anyway will Cynthia ever get to go out? Mom as an idea. Mom is Mary Astor who does a good job. Don't let the picture fool you. This probably more drama than comedy although there some of the latter. They are not so happy during the film. Mom and Dad have issues, early plans that never panned out, and whether to move on or stay in a rut living in this small town. It hangs over the head of both of them, and ours. Elizabeth never looks sickly, no surprise. But she doesn't look happy most of the time.  George Murphy is adequate. S.A. Sakall is the impresario of the school theater and has billed Cynthia for the lead. Alas ... Liz sings a sweet song and I thought there might be a possibility that she sang that herself. The singing voice sounded just Liz girlish voice. But no. It really was very well sung

 

GgEzIAm.jpg

Oh my, she looks so happy ... wonder what happened!

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from April of 2019 to April of 2020, I had a lot more fun than I thought I would writing (and completing!) a screenplay which I jokingly saved on my computer as SOME **** ABOUT VAMPIRES, that is not the actual title. in writing it, i felt as if a governor had been taken off me engine and I had an awful lot of fun paying various homages to CLASSIC HORROR FILMS- of which I have been a lifelong, passionate fan.

On finishing it, I have tried to return to a screenplay I was previously working on which is grounded in reality- no horror or fantasy elements- and I am having a DEVIL OF A TIME getting back into it...

So I have been kicking around the notion of writing SOME **** ABOUT WEREWOLVES, and as such I finally got around to watching WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)- which is my third favorite horror film of all time and which I just adore. I could go on about it forever, but I won't.

Werewolf-of-London-1935.jpg

And then I rented THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF (1961) on amazon prime.

I am a big aficianado of HAMMER HORROR and- oddly I don't recall ever sitting through this film in its entirety. I recall finding it online and TCM and in both cases, for whatever reasons, I did not finish.

I really wonder why, BECAUSE ITS A FASCINATING FILM- made all the moreso by the bottom-line dictated "artistic" decision to set the whole tale in SPAIN (Hammer had redressed THE BRAY STUDIOS BACKLOT for a SPANISH INQUISITION FILM that never ended up getting made [ed note- bet they did not expect that!] and the decision works- although these are THE MOST BRITISH SPANISH PEOPLE EVER.

This film is shocking for 1961- and holds up well today- allegedly the box office was not good (although i always take box office receipts from ye olde days with a grain of salt) Still, for a while after this film, I think HAMMER did pull back on the blood and sex. there are some really well-done jump cuts and scares in this, the make-up is excellent, and there are moments (as there often are in the best of horror films) where it totters on the brink of being a BLACK COMEDY- especially the scenes from the titular werewolf's childhood (authors note- did you know that being r a ped by a hirstute maniac, getting pregnant and then having the baby on Christmas Day will make it a werewolf? neither did I.)

YOUNG SMOKING HOT OLIVER REED EVENTUALLY SHOWS UP OVER AN HOUR IN, his performance may seem a little intense and erratic, but it makes sense.

there is also THIS which, WOOF!!!!!:

OIP.OuI_F8Ac2NCBIGF8IC4dHgHaD_?pid=Api&r

There are some men who just had no choice but to become MOVIE STARS because, had they been an electrician or a dentist or a highway patrolman, 9 out of 10 women and 1 out of every 10 men they encountered in the course of a day's work would literally THROW THEMSELVES AT THEM SHOUTING "TAKE ME HERE! TAKE ME NOW!"

OLIVER REED was one such man.

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55 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

from April of 2019 to April of 2020, I had a lot more fun than I thought I would writing (and completing!) a screenplay which I jokingly saved on my computer as SOME **** ABOUT VAMPIRES, that is not the actual title. in writing it, i felt as if a governor had been taken off me engine and I had an awful lot of fun paying various homages to CLASSIC HORROR FILMS- of which I have been a lifelong, passionate fan.

On finishing it, I have tried to return to a screenplay I was previously working on which is grounded in reality- no horror or fantasy elements- and I am having a DEVIL OF A TIME getting back into it...

So I have been kicking around the notion of writing SOME **** ABOUT WEREWOLVES, and as such I finally got around to watching WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)- which is my third favorite horror film of all time and which I just adore. I could go on about it forever, but I won't.

Werewolf-of-London-1935.jpg

And then I rented THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF (1961) on amazon prime.

I am a big aficianado of HAMMER HORROR and- oddly I don't recall ever sitting through this film in its entirety. I recall finding it online and TCM and in both cases, for whatever reasons, I did not finish.

I really wonder why, BECAUSE ITS A FASCINATING FILM- made all the moreso by the bottom-line dictated "artistic" decision to set the whole tale in SPAIN (Hammer had redressed THE BRAY STUDIOS BACKLOT for a SPANISH INQUISITION FILM that never ended up getting made [ed note- bet they did not expect that!] and the decision works- although these are THE MOST BRITISH SPANISH PEOPLE EVER.

This film is shocking for 1961- and holds up well today- allegedly the box office was not good (although i always take box office receipts from ye olde days with a grain of salt) Still, for a while after this film, I think HAMMER did pull back on the blood and sex. there are some really well-done jump cuts and scares in this, the make-up is excellent, and there are moments (as there often are in the best of horror films) where it totters on the brink of being a BLACK COMEDY- especially the scenes from the titular werewolf's childhood (authors note- did you know that being r a ped by a hirstute maniac, getting pregnant and then having the baby on Christmas Day will make it a werewolf? neither did I.)

YOUNG SMOKING HOT OLIVER REED EVENTUALLY SHOWS UP OVER AN HOUR IN, his performance may seem a little intense and erratic, but it makes sense.

there is also THIS which, WOOF!!!!!:

OIP.OuI_F8Ac2NCBIGF8IC4dHgHaD_?pid=Api&r

There are some men who just had no choice but to become MOVIE STARS because, had they been an electrician or a dentist or a highway patrolman, 9 out of 10 women and 1 out of every ten men they encountered in the course of a day's work would literally THROW THEMSELVES AT THEM SHOUTING "TAKE ME HERE! TAKE ME NOW!"

OLIVER REED was one such man.

THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF is a fascinating werewolf movie that I always enjoyed. Oliver Reed does a dang fine acting job as the cursed man, and I can't argue that in his prime he was one fine young stud.

WEREWOLF OF LONDON is a lot of fun to watch too, with a rare but exceptional leading performance from Henry Hull as the title character.

1941'S THE WOLF MAN gets all the werewolf love from most viewers, but, in my view,  THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF and WEREWOLF OF LONDON deserve their share of applause as well.

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15 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF is a fascinating werewolf movie that I always enjoyed. Oliver Reed does a dang fine acting job as the cursed man, and I can't argue that in his prime he was one fine young stud.

WEREWOLF OF LONDON is a lot of fun to watch too, with a rare but exceptional leading performance from Henry Hull as the title character.

1941'S THE WOLF MAN gets all the werewolf love from most viewers, but, in my view,  THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF and WEREWOLF OF LONDON deserve their share of applause as well.

They kind of form a TRIUNE as THE THREE WEREWOLF FILMS, although honorable mention is merited by FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN and THE RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE (even if the WEREWOLF in that movie looks a little like a Schnauzer.)

eta, a lot like a schnauzer actually:

 

OIP.uTwY5Zd00v6B9mmU9FzroAHaJ-?pid=Api&r7d60fc5ca8630fe7e5e401bbb8023df5.jpg

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

from April of 2019 to April of 2020, I had a lot more fun than I thought I would writing (and completing!) a screenplay which I jokingly saved on my computer as SOME **** ABOUT VAMPIRES, that is not the actual title. in writing it, i felt as if a governor had been taken off me engine and I had an awful lot of fun paying various homages to CLASSIC HORROR FILMS- of which I have been a lifelong, passionate fan.

On finishing it, I have tried to return to a screenplay I was previously working on which is grounded in reality- no horror or fantasy elements- and I am having a DEVIL OF A TIME getting back into it...

So I have been kicking around the notion of writing SOME **** ABOUT WEREWOLVES, and as such I finally got around to watching WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)- which is my third favorite horror film of all time and which I just adore. I could go on about it forever, but I won't.

Werewolf-of-London-1935.jpg

And then I rented THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF (1961) on amazon prime.

I am a big aficianado of HAMMER HORROR and- oddly I don't recall ever sitting through this film in its entirety. I recall finding it online and TCM and in both cases, for whatever reasons, I did not finish.

I really wonder why, BECAUSE ITS A FASCINATING FILM- made all the moreso by the bottom-line dictated "artistic" decision to set the whole tale in SPAIN (Hammer had redressed THE BRAY STUDIOS BACKLOT for a SPANISH INQUISITION FILM that never ended up getting made [ed note- bet they did not expect that!] and the decision works- although these are THE MOST BRITISH SPANISH PEOPLE EVER.

This film is shocking for 1961- and holds up well today- allegedly the box office was not good (although i always take box office receipts from ye olde days with a grain of salt) Still, for a while after this film, I think HAMMER did pull back on the blood and sex. there are some really well-done jump cuts and scares in this, the make-up is excellent, and there are moments (as there often are in the best of horror films) where it totters on the brink of being a BLACK COMEDY- especially the scenes from the titular werewolf's childhood (authors note- did you know that being r a ped by a hirstute maniac, getting pregnant and then having the baby on Christmas Day will make it a werewolf? neither did I.)

YOUNG SMOKING HOT OLIVER REED EVENTUALLY SHOWS UP OVER AN HOUR IN, his performance may seem a little intense and erratic, but it makes sense.

there is also THIS which, WOOF!!!!!:

OIP.OuI_F8Ac2NCBIGF8IC4dHgHaD_?pid=Api&r

There are some men who just had no choice but to become MOVIE STARS because, had they been an electrician or a dentist or a highway patrolman, 9 out of 10 women and 1 out of every 10 men they encountered in the course of a day's work would literally THROW THEMSELVES AT THEM SHOUTING "TAKE ME HERE! TAKE ME NOW!"

OLIVER REED was one such man.

I really enjoy Werewolf of London. I rewatched it not too long ago and I think it holds up quite well. I need to watch more Hammer films. I've read so much about them yet I've only seen a handful of their titles. I'll probably check out The Curse of the Werewolf soon since it's on the new Peacock app.

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