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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

Just noticed she thanks Howard Otway as the man who recommended her for the part. I knew him slightly, he ran the wonderful Theatre 80 St. Marks in New York's East Village, a temple of classic movies, for years before the cable/video age. I spent many enjoyable evenings there.

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16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

What a coincidence-I just watched '56 MIRACLE IN THE RAIN where I saw Eileen in her first film role! Standout performance!

This movie had been recommended on this board, my library had it so  figured I might as well borrow it. It stars two actors I have no affection for; Jane Wyman and Van Johnson. Well, both played their parts so well, my opinion of them has softened.  Van Johnson plays a big personality go-getter type of guy, a solder on leave in NYC seeing the sights. Wyman plays a wallflower type of girl who works in an office and cares for her lonely bitter mother in their brownstone apartment.

Of course they meet in the doorway of a building, waiting for a downpour to subside, Johnson (charactor: Art Hungenon) noticing Wyman (charactor: Ruth Wood) carrying groceries, sweet talks his way to inviting himself to her place for dinner. He redeems himself of being a freeloader creep by stopping at a deli to buy meat, cheeses & cake to supplement the meal. He's really just lonely and is using his outgoing personality to be included in any family's home.  Most everything else that happens in this movie is super cliché: they fall in love, he gets sent into combat, she waits for him, etc.

What really sets this film apart is the great supporting cast, including Eileen Heckart as Grace, Ruthie's more experienced co-worker. When Ruthie is feeling confused or depressed, Grace is literally supporting her as the best friend, taking her shopping, to the movies and ultimately St Patrick's Cathedral. Ruthie's bitter mother is played by Josephine Hutchinson perfectly and convincingly, even resembling Wyman. There's a few amusing charactor sub plots that add reality and round out the story- a young Arte Johnson as a workplace nerd, an office romance between Peggy Castle & Fred Clark (!) and a newlywed soldier & exotic entertainer they befriend in Central Park.

All the performers are pitch perfect and I found myself completely charmed by Van Johnson and absorbed in Wyman's charactor. Both these roles could have been ruined by weak or bad performances, but somehow they both brought realism & sincerity to their parts. I absolutely found Wyman a powerhouse actress, even though she was essentially playing a weak, naive girl. The ending was predictable and corny, but I liked it anyway.

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10 hours ago, Swithin said:

Just noticed she thanks Howard Otway as the man who recommended her for the part. I knew him slightly, he ran the wonderful Theatre 80 St. Marks in New York's East Village, a temple of classic movies, for years before the cable/video age. I spent many enjoyable evenings there.

Yes, I loved that place. I first saw The Old Dark House (1932) after it was feared lost for many years. I also saw Freaks (1932) for the first time there. Now I own both on DVD,

The place is still there though it is a live theater now, no longer a movie revival house. The pavement in front of it has some big stars leaving their hand or foot prints in cement. Some are Joan Crawford, Myrna Loy, Joan Blondell, Gloria Swanson. 

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Yes, I loved that place. I first saw The Old Dark House (1932) after it was feared lost for many years. I also saw Freaks (1932) for the first time there. Now I own both on DVD,

The place is still there though it is a live theater now, no longer a movie revival house. The pavement in front of it has some big stars leaving their hand or foot prints in cement. Some are Joan Crawford, Myrna Loy, Joan Blondell, Gloria Swanson. 

I also have THE OLD DARK HOUSE and FREAKS on DVD. Even to this day FREAKS still causes a lot of controversy.

I wish my neighborhood had a movie revival house, I think it would be thrilling to see all the old films on the REALLY big screen.

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Murder on the Orient Express Poster

Murder On The Orient Express (1974) Cinemax On Demand 8/10

Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot investigates a brutal murder on a train.

First time viewing for me, I enjoyed it very much. There is a great cast of suspects including Lauren Bacall, Martin Balsam, Sean Connery, Ingrid Bergman (won her third Oscar for this), John Gielgud,Wendy Hiller, Anthony Perkins, Rachel Roberts, Vanessa Redgrave and Richard Widmark as the victim. This started a trend of star studded Agatha Christie films. I thought Albert Finney was entertaining as Poirot. I have seen some criticism of his portrayal but I am not a Poirot aficionado, this is the first film I have seen featuring this character. The film got me hooked right away with the back story of the kidnapping and murder of little rich girl. Every member of the cast gets at least one scene to strut their stuff. I found some enjoyment seeing Perkins and Balsam reunited (as in Psycho and Catch 22). Also Humphrey Bogart's widow Bacall sharing a scene with his Casablanca co star Bergman. 

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I remember watching the movie and having to do a doubletake to realize that underneath the makeup was Albert Finney.  I liked Finney as Poirot, and, heaven help me, Kenneth B. of the Poirot and the moving mustache is planning on doing another adaptation of a Christie/Poirot novel.  Peter Ustinov and David Suchet also made interesting Poirots.

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6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Murder On The Orient Express (1974) Cinemax On Demand 8/10

I thought Albert Finney was entertaining as Poirot. I have seen some criticism of his portrayal but I am not a Poirot aficionado, this is the first film I have seen featuring this character. The film got me hooked right away with the back story of the kidnapping and murder of little rich girl

It's STILL one of the movies (along with "All the President's Men", FSR) that singlehandedly defined the classy 70's Golden Age for me, of all the movies I saw at our local walking-distance one-screen theater.

Looking at it now, David Suchet on the PBS series is still the "true" fussy, maddening, overly-suspicious Poirot, but Finney easily comes in second--Although Finney's barking intensity, his slicked-back hair, and his hunching over slightly to look "shorter" now unnervingly seems to suggest Hitler with a better mustache:

6a00e5500c8a2a883301b7c8df1dbe970b-pi

The followup, Death on the Nile (1978) with Peter Ustinov, is also currently floating around the Paramount orphans on streaming, even if it's more of a straightforward Christie mystery, and doesn't have the iconic twist her better-known one did.

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19 hours ago, EricJ said:

[ORIENT EXPRESS] is  STILL one of the movies (along with "All the President's Men", FSR) that singlehandedly defined the classy 70's Golden Age for me, of all the movies I saw at our local walking-distance one-screen theater.

 

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The followup, Death on the Nile (1978) with Peter Ustinov, is also currently floating around the Paramount orphans on streaming, even if it's more of a straightforward Christie mystery, and doesn't have the iconic twist her better-known one did.

ORIENT EXPRESS Is easily one of my 10 favorite movies the 1970s, a decade that I admittedly am not as well-versed in as most of the others of the 20th century.
and yet, while  I know it is superior to DEATH ON THE NILE, I’ve probably seen NILE 3x As many times.

Curiously, I just did a Roku search for it and came up with absolutely nothing. What streaming services have you found “death on the Nile” at?
ps- I thought the David Suchet version was very good, they made excellent use of the Al Bowly classic “love is the sweetest thing “ and used the original Karnak steamer that was used in the 1979 movie, Shooting it from a lot of different angles to where I did not even look like the same boat. Only thing I remember not being pleased with was the absolutely atrocious performance of Elliott Gould and the George Kennedy role.

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You know, when Peter Ustinov played Poirot, at least I could understand him. Albert Finney's frequently garbled accent becomes a hindrance and annoyance to my understanding what he is saying in Orient Express at times.

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What Now, Little Man? (1934)  I've been looking for this one to turn up on TCM, partly because I've become a little obsessed with Douglass Montgomery since seeing him in the original Waterloo Bridge, but also because it is a Frank Borzage film set in barely pre-Hitler Germany, a theme that director is noted for.  Montgomery has more of a naturalistic acting style than one is accustomed to for that era, and in one scene is near tears when he is humiliated by an actor  when he is working as a sales clerk at a heartless retail establishment.  Margaret Sullivan is fragile and luminous, as always.  There are the undercurrents of the social inequities and dissatisfaction that led to Hitler's rise, but also much in common with the Depression conditions in our own nation.  Some great support by Alan Hale, as always, and some frank pre-code themes (his stepmother is actually a madam and the young wife is pregnant before they marry).  The print that I saw was rather mediocre with poor sound quality, and it was subtitled in French, which I fortunately understand, so I could pick up the dialogue.   This is one of those "lost films" that I'd love to see TCM air.

 

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Curiously, I just did a Roku search for it and came up with absolutely nothing. What streaming services have you found “death on the Nile” at?

Paramount owns PlutoTV, which has a FWA a la carte Movie section, where Paramount (and MGM and  Columbia) orphans show up frequently.  They don't stay long, but the same rotation tends to show up month after month.

A quick check of Amazon Prime shows it isn't playing free at the moment there either, but Evil Under the Sun (1982), also with Ustinov, is.

EDIT:  Actually, I can't find Nile anywhere--It seems to have disappeared off of regular catalogs as well.  I'll bet donuts that this may be the studio's direct doing, in preparation for Kenneth Branagh's version that was supposed to open later this year.   That one's Fox, but they've done it before.

8 hours ago, TomJH said:

You know, when Peter Ustinov played Poirot, at least I could understand him. Albert Finney's frequently garbled accent becomes a hindrance and annoyance to my understanding what he is saying in Orient Express at times.

And, ftr, one of the other major actors to play Poirot besides...let's forget Tony Randall?:  Orson Welles.  

Yes, the Mercury Radio Theater did other shows besides invading Martians, specifically "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd":  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76NmPOZGhkY

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All the President's Men (1976)

Source: HBO Max

---

If there's one thing I love, it's a good journalism movie--and All the President's Men definitely delivered.  I also love how 70s movies look: the color seems somewhat flat and the film seems a little grainy, giving the film a gritty look.  I know this is a pretty famous, landmark film, but I'd never seen it before.  

I don't think much of a plot explanation is required.  If you know the Watergate scandal and how it led to Nixon's resignation, then you have the framework of this film.  This film depicts the true story of how the Washington Post brought down Nixon and many of the most prominent players in Washington.  Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford portray journalists, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, respectively. Bob is a new reporter for the Washington Post.  Carl has been with the paper longer and is assigned to work with Bob on his story. 

On June 17, 1972, the infamous break-in at the Democratic Headquarters at the Watergate Building occurs.  Five men are arrested after security guard, Frank Willis, discovers a security breach with a door's deadbolt.  He calls the police who interrupt the men installing wiretaps and other electronic bugging equipment.  Woodward is assigned to cover the Watergate break-in by the Washington Post.  After attending the arraignment hearing, Bob learns that there is more to this case than meets the eye. He discovers that one of the five men has connections to the CIA and Nixon's White House Counsel.

Bob is determined to investigate this story and write an article outing the persons involved in what appears to be a massive corruption scandal. The Washington Post ends up assigning Carl, a more senior member of the staff, to work with Bob on his story.  Throughout the film, Carl and Bob write drafts of their story for publishing.  Their executive editor, Ben Bradlee (Jason Robards), is skeptical of their story, but remains supportive.  His only requirement is more sources (that will corroborate information given by other sources) and real, hard evidence behind any claims made.  He does not want to publish a speculative story and risk a potential libel lawsuit or worse, undermining his and the Washington Post's credibility and reputation.

As the investigation unfolds, Bob and Carl discover that the burglary at Watergate was just the tip of the iceberg as to the amount of corrupting taking place in Washington.  Bob has an informant (nicknamed "Deep Throat" by Carl) whom he meets with at night, in the corner of a parking garage.  Deep Throat (Hal Holbrook) speaks using riddles and hints to Bob, avoiding providing him with any actual names or substantial facts.  

I loved this movie.  I enjoyed all the scenes in the newsroom.  I loved listening to the sounds of the typewriters in the movie.  I thought that the cast did a phenomenal job, especially the three leads: Hoffman, Redford, and Robards.  I knew vaguely about Watergate and that Nixon resigned because of his involvement in the scandal, but I didn't know quite how far-reaching it was.  There were dozens upon dozens of prolific persons involved in the planning, carrying out and covering up of the Watergate scandal.  

I would definitely watch this again.

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On the Science Channel "When Elevators Attack" :o (2020)

Title had me going, thought they were stalking ready to pounce on some unsuspecting victim at a moments notice.

So be careful...They're OUT THERE!

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTF1XZaoAw6-mvxGfxZ3cf

:P

 

Just kidding just about accidents / incidents .

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9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

His only requirement is more sources and real, hard evidence behind any claims made.  He does not want to publish a speculative story and risk a potential libel lawsuit or worse, undermining his and the Washington Post's credibility and reputation.

That sentence alone ^^^ bespeaks how long ago 1976 was and how different our culture and mores have changed....although I still look to the Washington Post as the last vestige of valid reporting. 

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12 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

That sentence alone ^^^ bespeaks how long ago 1976 was and how different our culture and mores have changed....although I still look to the Washington Post as the last vestige of valid reporting. 

I agree with you.  I remember having this same thought while watching the film.  Ben Bradlee not only wants multiple sources, he wants credible sources who are willing to go on record to corroborate the other sources' information.  This is such a stark contrast to today, where someone's stupid Tweet is considered "news" and you get articles like "Kim Kardashian broke the internet when she put on these ugly sweatpants." "News" articles are presented with a political bias, depending on which way the news company leans.  Very few articles post both sides of the story.  Headlines are crafted in a way that plants bias in the reader's head before he or she even starts reading the article. With a handful of exceptions, journalism is dead.

I love journalism movies: the characters' excitement when they get a scoop; the editor ordering the copywriters to get the story into the evening edition, stat.; the rush to get a statement from a possible witness; the sound of the typewriters frantically hacking out the latest hot story; the close-ups of newspaper headlines that also help advance the plot; the late night deadlines; etc. These movies are so much fun to watch. 

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31 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

 

I love journalism movies: the characters' excitement when they get a scoop; the editor ordering the copywriters to get the story into the evening edition, stat.; the rush to get a statement from a possible witness; the sound of the typewriters frantically hacking out the latest hot story; the close-ups of newspaper headlines that also help advance the plot; the late night deadlines; etc. These movies are so much fun to watch. 

You might like FIVE STAR FINAL (1931). 

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The Bad News Bears (1976)

Continuing on my 70s theme, I watched this movie last night.  I'd heard of this film, but I'd never seen it before.  I hadn't really thought about this film until I was listening to a podcast recently, and the hosts were discussing Tatum O'Neal and Paper Moon.  They then mentioned projects she did after winning the Oscar--The Bad News Bears and Little Darlings.  I've seen Little Darlings and was disappointed that it was not nearly as scandalous as I thought it would be.  I put in a hold at the library for The Bad News Bears, picked up the disc, and watched it last night.

In The Bad News Bears, Walter Matthau plays Morris Buttermaker (lol), an ex-minor league baseball player/current swimming pool cleaner.  He is recruited by a lawyer/city councilman to coach the new little league team.  The lawyer is suing a super-competitive Little League Association who prioritize winning above the children.  Children who are not gifted in baseball, like the lawyer's son, are permanent benchwarmers. To settle the lawsuit, the Little League Association agrees to add another team, the Bears, to the association.  This team will be comprised of all the worst players in the league. These children are a mess.  One kid is the stereotypical fat kid, there's a nearsighted kid, another kid who eats boogers, a different kid who has a temper problem, a very timid quiet boy, etc.  Tatum O'Neal joins the team as the girl pitcher ::gasp!:: with the great pitching arm.  Later, a killer batter, bad boy Jackie Earle Haley joins the team.

These kids and Morris are a mess.  Morris spikes his beer with whiskey and drinks it in the dugout, drinks it while driving, etc.  The kids are vulgar to one another and adults.  The kids have a disastrous first game--before Morris forfeits the game, they are down 26 runs.  It is after this terrible game when Morris realizes just how BAD his team is and he decides to bring in the big guns. He recruits Amanda (Tatum O'Neal), the daughter of his ex-girlfriend whom he remembers having a great pitching arm.  Later, they get the town bad boy, a motorcyclist who has a crush on Amanda.  He also happens to be a great batter and can actually catch the ball in the outfield. With these two weapons in place and actual 1:1 instruction.  The team improves and actually manages to bring the team up to a respectable second place in the league--soon the kids are in the championship game.

The main conflict in this game is the #1 place team, coached by Roy Turner (Vic Morrow). He epitomizes the bad sports parent.  He screams at the kids and berates them for every mistake they make.  He is extremely competitive and coaches his kids to use more ruthless and cutthroat tactics to win the game.  Morris becomes just as competitive and soon the two men are engaging in shouting matches, coaching the kids to try to casually get hit by the pitch to force a walk, and even fighting.  There is a poignant moment in the championship game that completely changes the tone of the game and film.  

I thought this was a great movie.  I don't even know if they could make a film like this today.  I know there was a remake in the early 00s with Billy Bob Thornton, but I haven't seen it.  Maybe it plays out the same as the original. I thought the scenes of the children smoking and drinking beer were funny. I also loved the scene where the Bears' sponsor, Chico's Bail Bonds, is revealed.  12-year old Tatum O'Neal and Walter Matthau had a great rapport.  I would watch a buddy movie with these two. 

I love sports movies and I would definitely watch this one again.

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14 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You might like FIVE STAR FINAL (1931). 

I've seen Five Star Final.  I own Five Star Final.  I agree, this was a fantastic movie.  I loved it. 

 

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I've seen Five Star Final.  I own Five Star Final.  I agree, this was a fantastic movie.  I loved it. 

 

IT'S A BOX OF CRACKER JACKS!!!!!!

(Avoid the 1936 remake with Bogie tho, woof!)

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Have you ever wondered what AMERICAN PSYCHO would have been like had Patrick Bateman been TWIN GYNECOLOGISTS? DAVID CRONENBERG is only too happy to answer that question in his 1988 film DEAD RINGERS, which I saw for the first time on AMAZON PRIME- and herein I add the note that- for some reason- their version froze constantly, to the point where I had to walk away a couple times and it ended up taking me a couple days to finish. (not really a fair way to watch a film for everyone.)

deadringers-jayshaw.jpg?token=FsJhLDvuQr

I saw Cronenberg's 1977 film VIRUS on TCM UNDERGROUND and was surprised by how much I LOVED IT; and I am a big fan of JEREMY IRONS, God's answer to the question: WHAT WOULD A SEXY BORIS KARLOFF LOOK LIKE?

IRONS and IRONS are absolutely TREMENDOUS in their dual roles; genuinely some impressive work...GENEVIEVE BUJOLD is in it, but in a very casual way- she's distantly peppered throughout almost as an afterthought.

the first half hour or so is VERY INVOLVING, it's one of those where you have a ball talking back to the screen, but honestly- its plotlessness and meandering style reminded me a lot of IN THE NAME OF THE ROSE- i could tell you the whole story of this thing in two sentences flat- and by the end, I was still cringing (in a good way) but really ready for this thing to be over.

I dunno, I think the story could have used some fleshing out...although I do not mean that in the way that CRONENBERG would maybe take it.

CANADA'S MEDICAL BOARD in 1988 is portrayed as being ASTOUNDINGLY LAX btw.

This is one film that WOMEN will ABSOLUTELY VIEW DIFFERENTLY then MEN. I am a man**, but I assert this forcefully.

 

 

**and I am ESPECIALLY THANKFUL FOR THAT after sitting through this one!

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

IT'S A BOX OF CRACKER JACKS!!!!!!

(Avoid the 1936 remake with Bogie tho, woof!)

I didn’t know there was a remake! What is it called?

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19 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I didn’t know there was a remake [of FIVE STAR FINAL]! What is it called?

TWO AGAINST THE WORLD (1936)- released by WB all of FIVE YEARS after the FIVE STAR FINAL! they changed THE SETTING from a NEWSPAPER to NEWSRADIO and BOGART is in the ROBINSON PART and the script stinks, the director clearly didn't have a clue what he was doing, and there is actually a moment in it where you can see BOGART LITERALLY LOSE HIS PATIENCE AND JUST GIVE UP ONSCREEN! Which shocked me, although I don't blame him.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0028426/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_72

IT MAY ACTUALLY BE BOGART'S WORST FILM (not that there is a lot of competition for that title.)

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