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8 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

To be honest, Tone, I couldn't finish watching, it was that bad. It was more about zombies and gypsies than werewolves. 

Many people here don't like Cry of the Werewolf. It's an unusual film, produced by Columbia, not a studio well known for its horror output in the classic days. I like it well enough, and I always enjoy Blanche Yurka's performances. Yurka had an amazing career on Broadway, not only in the classics and new plays, but also  directing on occasion. In 1920 she played Gertrude in a production of Hamlet with John Barrymore and Tyrone Power, Sr.

cry-of-the-werewolf-1944-shutterstock-ed

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42 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I checked out CRY OF THE WEREWOLF (1944)- as featured on NINA FOCH'S SUTS DAY.

It's the variation on CAT PEOPLE from COLUMBIA PICTURES, but with lesbian werewolves in New Orleans that I never knew existed. It uses the same score as RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE- which I think was made by Columbia in 1943, although I swear I have seen it credited as 1944- I wish they had used some of the sets. 

Return of the Vampire is a great film, perhaps the first with a woman (Frieda Inescort) as a Van Helsing-type character. I also like the tragic but rather sweet werewolf, who finds redemption at the end. Played by Matt Willis, he not only dresses well, he talks! Look at him -- don't you just want to pet him?

072320200943.jpg?1595522656

Return-of-the-Vampire-The_02.jpg

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7 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Many people here don't like Cry of the Werewolf. It's an unusual film, produced by Columbia, not a studio well known for its horror output in the classic days. I like it well enough, and I always enjoy Blanche Yurka's performances. Yurka had an amazing career on Broadway, not only in the classics and new plays, but also  directing on occasion. In 1920 she played Gertrude in a production of Hamlet with John Barrymore and Tyrone Power, Sr.

 

yes, THANK YOU, I'M SORRY, I forgot to mention BLANCHE YURKA, who was terrific as a NEW ORLEANS GYPSY WHO HAD SORT OF A, I DUNNO? GREEK ACCENT? in CRY OF THE WEREWOLF. There is a scene in a courtroom and I REALLY wish the director had had the foresight to have her character FURIOUSLY KNITTING IN THE BACKGROUND.

She was a HOOT.

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28 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Death Becomes Her is on HBO Max! I would have been okay with them showing Overboard.  Lol. 

"ANDREW! Are you going to bring me MY LEMON or DO I HAVE TO SQUEEZE IT FROM MY HAT?!"

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6 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Return of the Vampire is a great film, perhaps the first with a woman (Frieda Inescort) as a Van Helsing-type character. I also like the tragic but rather sweet werewolf, who finds redemption at the end. Played by Matt Willis, he not only dresses well, he talks! Look at him -- don't you just want to pet him?

072320200943.jpg?1595522656

Return-of-the-Vampire-The_02.jpg

Not only that. He does the master's laundry.

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WHEN I first saw RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE as a kid (on AMC or VHS in the 1990's) I was annoyed by the War making an appearance in it, because I didn't like war movies. now that i am older, i think it was a damned clever idea and really works.

it's curious how so many horror movies of the forties are set in a Europe where apparently, there is no World War going on.

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"ANDREW! Are you going to bring me MY LEMON or DO I HAVE TO SQUEEZE IT FROM MY HAT?!"

The whole concept of Overboard is awful, a man takes advantage of an amnesiac and makes her think she's his wife; but at the same time, she was so awful to him when she was the rich b---- on the yacht, that perhaps this is karma getting her.

What is this gelatinous muck?

A falsetto child?

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Cry of my  Werewolf Friend - Coming home from work the other night, driving by a sheep farm, I see something in the road ahead running. What is that? Is that a dog? It was a coyote and he was running in front of me.  Come on, move to the side, little pal, and he eventually did, little ****.  I take great delight in listening to them cry at night. It's soothing and creepy at the same time.  I doubt the sheep farmer would have been pleased tho...

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19 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Cry of my  Werewolf Friend - Coming home from work the other night, driving by a sheep farm, I see something in the road ahead running. What is that? Is that a dog? It was a coyote and he was running in front of me.  Come on, move to the side, little pal, and he eventually did, little ****.  I take great delight in listening to them cry at night. It's soothing and creepy at the same time.  I doubt the sheep farmer would have been pleased tho...

Coyotes are EVERYWHERE now! Even cities! 

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20 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Cry of my  Werewolf Friend - Coming home from work the other night, driving by a sheep farm, I see something in the road ahead running. What is that? Is that a dog? It was a coyote and he was running in front of me.  Come on, move to the side, little pal, and he eventually did, little ****.  I take great delight in listening to them cry at night. It's soothing and creepy at the same time.  I doubt the sheep farmer would have been pleased tho...

Coyotes are in the suburbs in southern Ontario. I frequently see a mangy one rushing along side a creek nearby, as well as having seen a young one in the park behind my house. Some people are afraid of them, and there may be reason to be concerned if you have a cat or small dog. But I find coyotes to be very skittish around people and don't find them a threat in any way. Just shout or bang something and they will probably take off.

Coyotes are truly victims with their natural habitat disappearing on them due to developers. The animals have to go somewhere so they invade suburbs, much to the consternation of many of their inhabitants. They don't want to be in the burbs, I'm sure, any more than suburbanites want to see them there.  In that respect, we're all victims.

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i watched PSYCHO III on HULU.

Psycho+III.png

fULL DISCLOSURE: FOR SOME REASON I STILL DO NOT ENTIRELY COMPREHEND, MY MOTHER TOOK ME, MY SISTER AND MY SISTER'S FRIEND TO SEE THIS WHEN I WAS EIGHT YEARS OLD AND MY SISTER AND HER FRIEND WERE 13. AND MY SISTER'S FRIEND WAS A MINISTER'S DAUGHTER. I still have pretty vivid memories of it.

i also remember, and this is not mentioned on the film's wiki or imdb page, but a theater in New York (I think) had a ceiling collapse during a showing of this, which I vaguely recall resulted in the film getting a "cursed" reputation and it was pulled by Universal after breaking even.

ANTHONY PERKINS directed this and he actually DOES A GREAT JOB, he and his cinematographer give us a great looking film throughout- the homage to VERTIGO in the beginning works well, an underwater car scene is really, really well done,  and the MOTEL and PSYCHO HOUSE are photographed brilliantly- you get a real sense of isolation from them, and that's funny, because if you have ever seen them on the UNIVERSAL LOT, you'll realize that they are smack in the middle of a bunch of exteriors in the SAN FERNANDO VALLEY.

one person falligngdown the stairs scene ala MARTIN BALSAM in the original does not work, but it's amusing.

PERKINS clearly knew how to work with actors and it's a shame he did not direct anything else. DIANA SCARWID, still nursing the bruises from MOMMIE DEAREST, is in this and she seems pretty damn committed. JEFF FAHEY is too and he is SO HOT and also, I am pretty sure COMPLETELY ON SPEED IN HIS FINAL SCENE.

 

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Last night, watched Cash McCall (sp?) but it is really a James Garner/Natalie Wood film followed by Executive Suite (enjoyed how Nina Foch was cajoled into doing the role).  I would have preferred the second movie, My Name is Julia Ross, which I had to stop watching because I had to turn in for the night, to An American in Paris.  In the latter movie, I always felt sorry for Nina's character.  My favorite character in the movie is the one played by Oscar Levant.  On a side note, back in November of last year, PBS ran a taped version of the Broadway musical of An American in Paris.  Much more ballet and much more about the Holocaust.  Julia Ross had a creepy performance by Dame May Witty.

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On 8/12/2020 at 9:47 PM, speedracer5 said:

All the President's Men (1976)

Source: HBO Max

---

If there's one thing I love, it's a good journalism movie--and All the President's Men definitely delivered.  I also love how 70s movies look: the color seems somewhat flat and the film seems a little grainy, giving the film a gritty look.  I know this is a pretty famous, landmark film, but I'd never seen it before.  

I don't think much of a plot explanation is required.  If you know the Watergate scandal and how it led to Nixon's resignation, then you have the framework of this film.  This film depicts the true story of how the Washington Post brought down Nixon and many of the most prominent players in Washington.  Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford portray journalists, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, respectively. Bob is a new reporter for the Washington Post.  Carl has been with the paper longer and is assigned to work with Bob on his story. 

On June 17, 1972, the infamous break-in at the Democratic Headquarters at the Watergate Building occurs.  Five men are arrested after security guard, Frank Willis, discovers a security breach with a door's deadbolt.  He calls the police who interrupt the men installing wiretaps and other electronic bugging equipment.  Woodward is assigned to cover the Watergate break-in by the Washington Post.  After attending the arraignment hearing, Bob learns that there is more to this case than meets the eye. He discovers that one of the five men has connections to the CIA and Nixon's White House Counsel.

Bob is determined to investigate this story and write an article outing the persons involved in what appears to be a massive corruption scandal. The Washington Post ends up assigning Carl, a more senior member of the staff, to work with Bob on his story.  Throughout the film, Carl and Bob write drafts of their story for publishing.  Their executive editor, Ben Bradlee (Jason Robards), is skeptical of their story, but remains supportive.  His only requirement is more sources (that will corroborate information given by other sources) and real, hard evidence behind any claims made.  He does not want to publish a speculative story and risk a potential libel lawsuit or worse, undermining his and the Washington Post's credibility and reputation.

As the investigation unfolds, Bob and Carl discover that the burglary at Watergate was just the tip of the iceberg as to the amount of corrupting taking place in Washington.  Bob has an informant (nicknamed "Deep Throat" by Carl) whom he meets with at night, in the corner of a parking garage.  Deep Throat (Hal Holbrook) speaks using riddles and hints to Bob, avoiding providing him with any actual names or substantial facts.  

I loved this movie.  I enjoyed all the scenes in the newsroom.  I loved listening to the sounds of the typewriters in the movie.  I thought that the cast did a phenomenal job, especially the three leads: Hoffman, Redford, and Robards.  I knew vaguely about Watergate and that Nixon resigned because of his involvement in the scandal, but I didn't know quite how far-reaching it was.  There were dozens upon dozens of prolific persons involved in the planning, carrying out and covering up of the Watergate scandal.  

I would definitely watch this again.

The 1970s was perhaps the golden age for political thrillers, The Parallax View (1974) and Three Days of the Condor (1975), just to name a few.  They seem to hold up well today.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i watched PSYCHO III on HULU.

ANTHONY PERKINS directed this and he actually DOES A GREAT JOB, he and his cinematographer give us a great looking film throughout- the homage to VERTIGO in the beginning works well,

Also the "Psychos in love" plot where Norman first double-takes at seeing Diana Scarwid wearing old secondhand clothes from 1960 and an old battered Marion Crane-like suitcase.

It's no Psycho II by a long stretch, but Perkins certainly meant well.

Quote

PERKINS clearly knew how to work with actors and it's a shame he did not direct anything else.

Perkins only went on to direct Lucky Stiff (1988) with comic Joe Alaskey, and if you don't remember it or Alaskey...

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5 hours ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

The 1970s was perhaps the golden age for political thrillers, The Parallax View (1974) and Three Days of the Condor (1975), just to name a few.  They seem to hold up well today.

Three Days of Condor was on my list. I hadn’t heard of The Parallax View. I’ll have to look into that one.

Thanks!

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Three Days of Condor was on my list. I hadn’t heard of The Parallax View. I’ll have to look into that one.

It's pretty good, in the early 70's post-JFK-conspiracy genre:  Warren Beatty takes Robert Redford's place, as a reporter investigating Parallax, an agency that seems to be interested in recruiting a certain type of individuals for undisclosed purposes...

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I just viewed Cry of the Werewolf for the first time. Competition for Lon Chaney Jr. in The Wolf Man this film is not. In fact I think I had a better time earlier in the day when I had to unplug my toilet.

Columbia produced it, not a studio known for its horror films and it showed here, even though that same studio had produced the atmospheric, entertaining Return of the Vampire only a view months before. Speaking of atmosphere, Cry could have used some, as well as a leading man who didn't have the excitement of a vacuum cleaner salesman. Done on the cheap with somebody's german shepherd substituting as a werewolf. A total waste of good actors like Nina Foch (as a gypsy queen yet) and Blanche Yurka (who had a better time rolling around on the floor with Edna May Oliver - talk about erotic! - in A Tale of Two Cities).

The next time you're having a difficult time getting to sleep I highly recommend putting this film on. It may be almost as good as trying to read the first two pages of Silas Marner (I've never made it to page 3). Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz . . .

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

 

The next time you're having a difficult time getting to sleep I highly recommend putting this film on. 

Totally agree, it was Rin Tin Tin on speed.. the phony stills were scarier than the whole film and they looked bad...

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6 minutes ago, nakano said:

Totally agree, it was Rin Tin Tin on speed.. the phony stills were scarier than the whole film and they looked bad...

Cry of the Werewolf should be supplied with a pillow to make it that much more comfortable for you when you sleep through the thing.

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On 8/14/2020 at 8:53 PM, speedracer5 said:

Shampoo (1975)

What this film DID do for me is introduce me to Julie Christie.  I don't think I'd ever seen her in a film before prior to this one.

I love Julie Christie! She's one of my favorite movie actors, and I'm grateful to TCM for introducing me to her work.

I recommend the following movies that feature Julie Christie:

DARLING:  This the movie that earned her the Best Actress Oscar.  Christie plays fashion model Diana Scott. Set in swinging 1960s London (and other European locations), this is one of my favorite movies although I admit it may not be for everyone's taste. The "truth game" at the Paris party is especially memorable 

McCABE & MRS MILLER:   This Robert Altman-directed  "Western" stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie in the title roles .  John McCabe and Constance Miller (Julie Christie goes Cockney!) run a brothel  in turn of the (twentieth) century  Washington State and enjoy an offbeat romance --- she makes him pay for sex! 

HEAVEN CAN WAIT: Warren Beatty  directed this remake of HERE COMES MR. JORDAN starring Beatty as Joe Pendleton (the Robert Montgomery role in the earlier movie). In Beatty's version, Pendleton is a football player instead of a boxer. Buck Henry plays the angel escort who takes Joe to heaven before his time. Julie Christie has a very unflattering hairstyle here, but I love the movie.

DEMON SEED:  Okay, this movie is weird but it pulled me in. It's a 1970s horror/science fiction thriller about a voice-activated intelligent computer program who imprisons the estranged wife (Julie Christie) of the computer's developer with the intent of impregnating  her!  Think Alexa gone mad. 

I do NOT recommend DOCTOR ZHIVAGO.  I hated this movie.  I struggled to get through it once and have no desire to see it again


 

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

I just viewed Cry of the Werewolf for the first time. Competition for Lon Chaney Jr. in The Wolf Man this film is not. In fact I think I had a better time earlier in the day when I had to unplug my toilet.

Only seen part of this movie, but seems like it was trying for more of an ambiguously atmospheric RKO-wannabe "Cat Wolf People" vibe than a Universal Lon-Chaney one.

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Coyotes are in the suburbs in southern Ontario. I frequently see a mangy one rushing along side a creek nearby, as well as having seen a young one in the park behind my house. Some people are afraid of them, and there may be reason to be concerned if you have a cat or small dog. But I find coyotes to be very skittish around people and don't find them a threat in any way. Just shout or bang something and they will probably take off.

One time I spent a month working part-time at a nature sanctuary taking care of the domesticated caged wolves (leaving out Cycle 3 once a day and feeding them by hand, twice a week...Which was my dog-person idea of heaven  🥰 ), and we also had one cage for a coyote that had been found abandoned on somebody else's property.

The coyote's cage was just up the hill overlooking a down path to the big storage bin of where we kept the extra bags, and while the other wolves in the area were used to people, every time we would come back up the hill, we would first see the coyote  just...crouched down against the ground, watching us from emergency stealth position.  This, I thought, was the true species of Wile E.

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