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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

One time I spent a month working part-time at a nature sanctuary taking care of the domesticated caged wolves (leaving out Cycle 3 once a day and feeding them by hand, twice a week...Which was my dog-person idea of heaven  🥰 ), and we also had one cage for a coyote that had been found abandoned on somebody else's property.

The coyote's cage was just up the hill overlooking a down path to the big storage bin of where we kept the extra bags, and while the other wolves in the area were used to people, every time we would come back up the hill, we would first see the coyote  just...crouched down against the ground, watching us from emergency stealth position.  This, I thought, was the true species of Wile E.

I have nothing but sympathy for coyotes forced to live in suburbs. I once had one rush past me as I was walking my small dog, no more than a foot from my pet. I didn't see him as he came from behind and he just wanted to get away from us. I've seen more than a few people panic and shout and even scream when they saw a coyote, afraid they might be attacked by him. The poor animal just ran faster than ever to get away. Of course they often say that shouting will frighten these animals but, in these cases, these people were shouting because they were almost as afraid as the coyote.

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8 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I love Julie Christie! She's one of my favorite movie actors, and I'm grateful to TCM for introducing me to her work.

I do NOT recommend DOCTOR ZHIVAGO.  I hated this movie.  I struggled to get through it once and have no desire to see it again
 

as a long-time poster on the boards here, it tickles me how certain titles just take on a life of their own- their very mention invokes STRONG FEELINGS in the plus or minus column, or as examples of "Jesus, God, THEY'RE PLAYING THIS ONE AGAIN!!!!"

DOCTOR ZHIVAGO is prime among these titles in both departments.

I actually made a BALALAIKA  a pretty important plot point as homage in something I wrote last year.

"Can we PLEASE turn OFF the ***-damned BALALAIKA! It sounds like someone should be SPINNING PLATES!"

 

ps- not too long ago I saw DON'T LOOK BACK with CHRISTIE and DONALD SUTHERLAND and I haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaated it.

 

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24 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"Can we PLEASE turn OFF the ***-damned BALALAIKA! It sounds like someone should be SPINNING PLATES!"

tenor.gif LOL

Thanks Holden for your recommendations. I can't stand Julie Christie after seeing her in Dr Zhivago & Heaven Can Wait, where I find her bland & blank. I like HCW a lot despite her presence but hated DrZ and will never watch it again- thought I was the only one.

I've just requested McCabe, Demon Seed & Petulia from my library hoping to change my opinion of Julie Christie-THANKS! 

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7 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

tenor.gif LOL

Thanks Holden for your recommendations. I can't stand Julie Christie after seeing her in Dr Zhivago & Heaven Can Wait, where I find her bland & blank. I like HCW a lot despite her presence but hated DrZ and will never watch it again- thought I was the only one.

I've just requested McCabe, Demon Seed & Petulia from my library hoping to change my opinion of Julie Christie-THANKS! 

I can't remember where, but I came across PETULIA and started watching and did not finish...I would not say it is bad, BUT IT IS WEIRD and it has some of the most (intentionally) off-putting set design of any film I can think of. VERY LATE SIXTIES.

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Yesterday afternoon, watched Talk of the Town for a little while.  Began To Catch a Thief; however, I've seen it numerous times, and, even though it may seem dumb to those immersed in films/classic films, I watched the Chopped Champions trying to earn a spot to beat Bobby Flay.

Back to Talk of the Town... I've heard varying stories re: how Cary Grant and Ronald C. got along.  There is a great deal of worthwhile conversation between the two in the film.  I think I posted this before.  Ronald Coleman has to immerse himself in the realities of jurisprudence before he will be worthy to sit on the bench.  The film also has a great supporting cast.

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37 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Yesterday afternoon, watched Talk of the Town for a little while.  Began To Catch a Thief; however, I've seen it numerous times, and, even though it may seem dumb to those immersed in films/classic films, I watched the Chopped Champions trying to earn a spot to beat Bobby Flay.

Back to Talk of the Town... I've heard varying stories re: how Cary Grant and Ronald C. got along.  There is a great deal of worthwhile conversation between the two in the film.  I think I posted this before.  Ronald Coleman has to immerse himself in the realities of jurisprudence before he will be worthy to sit on the bench.  The film also has a great supporting cast.

I loved Chopped.  It, along with the Great British Baking Show, is the only show I have record on my DVR.  Everything else are manual recordings that I set.  I always like to root for the least humble contestant to get chopped. 

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I liked when The Great British Baking Show was tied into the BBC.  The British Baking Show has a diverse group of contestants plus I can't believe what they bake under often extreme conditions.  I watch several cooking shows, but consider both the contestants and the judges.  In a recent NY Times interview, Padma L. was asked about why more black or African American contestants haven't one.  Well, she is the one who often has a vote in who has to pack their knives.

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12 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I love Julie Christie! She's one of my favorite movie actors, and I'm grateful to TCM for introducing me to her work.

I recommend the following movies that feature Julie Christie:

DARLING:  This the movie that earned her the Best Actress Oscar.  Christie plays fashion model Diana Scott. Set in swinging 1960s London (and other European locations), this is one of my favorite movies although I admit it may not be for everyone's taste. The "truth game" at the Paris party is especially memorable 

McCABE & MRS MILLER:   This Robert Altman-directed  "Western" stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie in the title roles .  John McCabe and Constance Miller (Julie Christie goes Cockney!) run a brothel  in turn of the (twentieth) century  Washington State and enjoy an offbeat romance --- she makes him pay for sex! 

HEAVEN CAN WAIT: Warren Beatty  directed this remake of HERE COMES MR. JORDAN starring Beatty as Joe Pendleton (the Robert Montgomery role in the earlier movie). In Beatty's version, Pendleton is a football player instead of a boxer. Buck Henry plays the angel escort who takes Joe to heaven before his time. Julie Christie has a very unflattering hairstyle here, but I love the movie.

DEMON SEED:  Okay, this movie is weird but it pulled me in. It's a 1970s horror/science fiction thriller about a voice-activated intelligent computer program who imprisons the estranged wife (Julie Christie) of the computer's developer with the intent of impregnating  her!  Think Alexa gone mad. 

I do NOT recommend DOCTOR ZHIVAGO.  I hated this movie.  I struggled to get through it once and have no desire to see it again
 

 

9 hours ago, Sukhov said:

McCabe and Mrs. Miller is a must watch. That ending is incredible. Also neat Leonard Cohen soundtrack.

 

3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

as a long-time poster on the boards here, it tickles me how certain titles just take on a life of their own- their very mention invokes STRONG FEELINGS in the plus or minus column, or as examples of "Jesus, God, THEY'RE PLAYING THIS ONE AGAIN!!!!"

DOCTOR ZHIVAGO is prime among these titles in both departments.

I actually made a BALALAIKA  a pretty important plot point as homage in something I wrote last year.

"Can we PLEASE turn OFF the ***-damned BALALAIKA! It sounds like someone should be SPINNING PLATES!"

 

ps- not too long ago I saw DON'T LOOK BACK with CHRISTIE and DONALD SUTHERLAND and I haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaated it.

 

I was already going to record McCabe and Mrs. Miller on Warren Beatty's day (which I think is tomorrow).  This film is part of the Criterion collection and I'd always been intrigued by it. I'm glad to see two positive recommendations for this film.

I have Darling recorded on my DVR.  I hadn't seen it yet.

I also haven't seen Heaven Can Wait, but I did see that it was on HBO Max.  The Parallax View (which was recommended to me earlier) is also on HBO Max.

Re: Doctor Zhivago.  I haven't seen this one, but it does seem to be on TCM all the time.  I wish David Lean hadn't segued so heavily into these epic films.  I really enjoyed Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit and Summertime

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24 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I liked when The Great British Baking Show was tied into the BBC.  The British Baking Show has a diverse group of contestants plus I can't believe what they bake under often extreme conditions.  I watch several cooking shows, but consider both the contestants and the judges.  In a recent NY Times interview, Padma L. was asked about why more black or African American contestants haven't one.  Well, she is the one who often has a vote in who has to pack their knives.

I like that everyone on The Great British Baking Show is so nice and supportive of one another.  The only prize is a cake platter, so there's no cash prize to make people greedy and cutthroat.  I preferred Mary Berry and Mel & Sue to the new judge and Sandy & Noel, but they've all grown on me.  Now Sandy is leaving, so it'll be interesting to see who the next host will be.  I've been waiting forever for another season to pop up on Netflix. 

(Though, I will admit that it does bring me a certain satisfaction to see someone's creation topple over)

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The Dark Past (1948).  I recorded this film on Nina Foch's day.  I was more intrigued by William Holden playing a psychopath than seeing Foch.  This film was just okay--definitely not a film that I would return to again and again.  I am happy to report that Lee J. Cobb did not overact in this film.  I thought he kept himself pretty restrained in this one.  I also liked that the film was only 75 minutes long.  I am not sure why Nina Foch had second billing.  This film was much more about  Lee J. Cobb and William Holden.  Her character was very much on the peripheral to the main action in the film.  This film had a very strong message re: rehabilitation versus incarceration.

Lee J. Cobb plays Dr. Andrew Collins, a police psychiatrist. At the beginning of the film, he (along with another group of men) are reviewing the latest line-up of criminals. One particular criminal stands out to Dr. Collins, a young 18-year old man who is quickly building a very impressive rap sheet.  He is on his ninth arrest and doesn't seem to be showing any intention to stop being a criminal.  The policeman who sustained a head injury from this young man is ready to throw him into the clink; but Dr. Collins thinks that rehabilitation would be a better route for this young man.  He believes that giving him some psychiatric therapy would be more beneficial to the young man and perhaps keep him from further decline.  Then, Dr. Collins uses the example of a previous man he worked with, Al Walker (William Holden), a criminal who received psychiatric therapy when it was too late.

This starts a flashback that serves as the main action of the film.  Dr. Collins, his wife, and son are spending the weekend in a cabin.  They've invited another couple, Laura (Adele Jergens) and Frank (Wilton Graff) Stevens to share the weekend.  Randomly, Laura brings another man, Mike (Berry Kroeger), to be her companion.  So we have Frank and Laura, husband and wife spending the weekend with their friends, the Collins, and Laura's beau? I wanted to know MORE about this story, but unfortunately, this story is never fully explained.  All we know from the dialogue is that Laura and Frank are having some marital issues, but duh, obviously, Laura brought another man to spend the weekend with her, her husband, and her friends! That's pretty brazen. 

Anyway, the love triangle between the Stevens and Mike is hardly the focal point of this story.  While the two couples are spending a pleasant evening playing darts and listening to music and such, their festivities are interrupted by escape convict Al Walker, his girlfriend Betty (Nina Foch), and his goons.  They apparently are waiting for a ride and are using the cabin to hideout.  Al and his crew take the occupants of the cabin hostage.  Al basically lets the group carry on as normal while his crew watch them intently.  As the night drags on, it becomes apparent to Dr. Collins that Al has some deep-seated emotional issues, including a reoccurring nightmare.  Dr. Collins makes it his mission to analyze Al and determine what the nightmare means as a way to help him.  We are then treated to what I can imagine are some fairly simplistic explanations of human psychology.  Dr. Collins seems to easily find symbolism and draw conclusions between Al's testimony and explanation of his dream.  I have never been a practicing psychiatrist, but I can imagine that it is not this easy.

Anyway, this film had a very strong message and I thought it was okay.  There are some unanswered questions and random scenes that didn't really seem to have a conclusion, making me think that perhaps they should have drawn this thing out a little longer than 75 minutes.  I didn't really understand the point of having Dr. Collins' colleague visit the cabin after the group is already taken hostage.  We see a scene where his wife reports him missing, but then that's it.  The love triangle is mentioned but nothing comes of it and it doesn't impact the plot whatsoever.  What I did like was William Holden's mugshot in the film, it looked like a glamorous head shot.  I loved seeing Lucy Ricardo's mother, Mrs. McGillicuddy (Kathryn Card) and Grandma Walton (Ellen Corby) as the two maids. 

Anyway.  This film was okay, but I probably won't need to revisit this anytime soon. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

tenor.gif LOL

Thanks Holden for your recommendations. I can't stand Julie Christie after seeing her in Dr Zhivago & Heaven Can Wait, where I find her bland & blank. I like HCW a lot despite her presence but hated DrZ and will never watch it again- thought I was the only one.

I've just requested McCabe, Demon Seed & Petulia from my library hoping to change my opinion of Julie Christie-THANKS! 

I think that Julie Christie's finest hour was probably Far from the Madding Crowd in 1967, an elegant, well-mounted version of a literary classic.... with no balalaikas in sight. She also had some snap in a smaller role in Billy Liar (1963). Her two late career nominations, for 1997's Afterglow as a former horror film actress with an unfaithful husband (Nick Nolte) and 2006/2007's Away from Her as a woman in the fog of Alzheimer's were both simple, unadorned, touching performances.

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Time Bandits (1981) --- 5.5/10 --- source: HBO

VGRiMJQ.jpg

This rubbed me the wrong way. I loved The Fisher King, and liked The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Brazil, and 12 Monkeys, but Terry Gilliam lost me here. It's a curiously nihilistic and sadistic fantasy ostensibly for kids that has very little narrative momentum and relies solely on visual bravado to help get it through. Admittedly it is an imaginative film, and there are brief little moments of amusement, but the whole thing seems very wrong-headed and misguided. Fun closing song from George Harrison, though.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I actually made a BALALAIKA  a pretty important plot point as homage in something I wrote last year.

"Can we PLEASE turn OFF the ***-damned BALALAIKA! It sounds like someone should be SPINNING PLATES!"

I always thought Ed-Sullivan plate spinners spun plates to "Sabre Dance", which would be a conceivable complaint against One, Two, Three.   😄

14 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Time Bandits (1981) --- 5.5/10 --- source: HBO

This rubbed me the wrong way. I loved The Fisher King, and liked The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Brazil, and 12 Monkeys, but Terry Gilliam lost me here. It's a curiously nihilistic and sadistic fantasy ostensibly for kids that has very little narrative momentum and relies solely on visual bravado to help get it through. Admittedly it is an imaginative film, and there are brief little moments of amusement, but the whole thing seems very wrong-headed and misguided. Fun closing song from George Harrison, though.

Terry Gilliam, who was convinced he was much more of a "biting Swiftian satirist" than he was, was equally convinced this was some "traumatic" satire on beloved historical fantasy that would "crush" innocent children's dreams...Only to discover that Harry Potter ended up stealing most of the neato kids' fantasy, and only wishes they could have borrowed the Sean Connery scene.  Admit it, you can't watch Kevin's parents without thinking of JK Rowling's Roald-Dahl cribbing for the Dursleys, or vice versa.  (Even George Harrison wrote cute songs for Bandits thinking it was going to be a lot more "kiddy" than it was.)

If you're one of those Brazil/Fisher King/12 Monkeys Criterion-watching Gilliam fans, you deserve to hate this movie.  And Baron Munchhausen could have been a lot more fun if Terry had made it right after Bandits and not after Brazil.

Although I remember, back in the days when local theaters were independently owned, theater owners had to bid, football-draft style, for a certain number of prints in the area, and got to see early screenings and showreels of what was available for booking.  I'd ended up in a conversation with one theater owner who explained how it worked; he told me he'd just gotten back from an early screening session and  warned me away from the "worst movie he'd ever seen!"  Yeah, some people don't get it.

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The essential Julie Christie movie for me is Billy Liar, where you understand why she became a star. Not that she isn't good in Darling, but for me that is mostly about a great performance by Dirk Bogarde and a very enlightened view of homosexuality. Far from the Madding Crowd is entertaining, and Terence Stamp is as beautiful and sexy as Julie is. Cue up "Waterloo Station": "Terry and Julie meet at the station . . . ." I like Doctor Zhivago and do not like McCabe and Mrs. Miller. In Easy Riders, Raging Bulls Beatty is alleged to have said that McCabe and Mrs. Miller is about himself being a movie star and a little about Julie and nothing about anyone else,  and that is absolutely on target, as far as I'm concerned.

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13 hours ago, kingrat said:

The essential Julie Christie movie for me is Billy Liar, where you understand why she became a star.

I've brought this up a lot, I know, but 1963 is a weird year for film- it's not a bad year for films, but it's one with a dearth of titles that are truly something great.  Besides the suffocating epics, there are some films that feel like there's a governor on their engine- keeping them from really revving it up.

the only two films from that year that- to me- have something special about them are TOM JONES and BILLY LIAR.

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I love the period of the early-to mid 1960s when they’re transitioning out of production code and into more modern fare. There’s such an interesting mix of movies. 

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59 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I love the period of the early-to mid 1960s when they’re transitioning out of production code and into more modern fare. There’s such an interesting mix of movies. 

1963, 1965, 1966 and 1969 are, for me, "off" years for films overall. i DON'T FEEL like those years offer as many exceptional titles as others.

1962, 1967 and 1968 are exceptional years for film.

60 and 61 are good.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

1963, 1965, 1966 and 1969 are, for me, "off" years for films overall. i DON'T FEEL like those years offer as many exceptional titles as others.

1962, 1967 and 1968 are exceptional years for film.

60 and 61 are good.

1963 is weak, although if you add foreign films like The Organizer, The Fire Within, 8 1/2, The Silence, and Contempt that helps. I have reservations about some of those films, but they all have their points. 1962 is one of the great years in Hollywood and abroad. For 1961 I had to scramble to get ten favorite English-language films after Whistle Down the Wind, West Side Story, and The Guns of Navarone.

1965 is curious. My top five English-language films are King Rat, The Hill, The Train, Mirage, and The Spy Who Came In From the Cold. Add A Patch of Blue, Darling, The Pawnbroker, and Chimes at Midnight, and what do these nine films have in common? Except for The Train and Mirage these are all rather downbeat dramas, but that isn't the answer.

 

SPOILER: All these films are in black & white. This is the last great year of B&W, although my two favorite films from 1966, Seconds and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, are also in B&W. 1966, probably the last year of the studio era, was also the last year of separate awards for B&W Set Design and B&W Cinematography.

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

1963, 1965, 1966 and 1969 are, for me, "off" years for films overall. i DON'T FEEL like those years offer as many exceptional titles as others.

1962, 1967 and 1968 are exceptional years for film.

60 and 61 are good.

You are right about 1963. 

 

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Good Omens (2019)

 

Approaching this mini-series involved a conundrum. I like David Tennant very much and know him to be very versatile. He takes ownership of his roles and gives a great performance even when the program is not to my taste. The opposite side is that every "Amazon Original" which I have watched or attempted to watch has proven to be  mundane, insipid and quite overblown for the material. That they pander to couch potatoes does not help. 

I had some hopes for it because I like very much Terry Pratchett's stories but am not a great fan of his writing on a word choice/sentence-paragraph level. I felt this was an excellent opportunity to experience his brilliance while avoiding his text.

I am very happy to say that I found the mini-series to be quite wonderful! 

David Tennant is perfect as a demon. I believe the most telling moments are not when he is actively wicked but instead are in the way he is so casually evil. He carries an aura of devilish delight in even the most neutral act. I was not a fan of the CGI done on his eyes but it was relatively subtle and could be overlooked.

Michael Sheen is a quite believable angel. I think I would have preferred him to be a little more dithering but that might have detracted from the innate sense of his devotion to do good which all angels must possess. He carries the role well.

Anna Maxwell-Martin was stunning as Beelzebub! She was the absolute personification of an evil boss. Her body language and timing were more insidious than her dialogue.

There was something about Sam Taylor Buck's hair that made him look less like the Antichrist and more like a character from: Mars Attacks (1996) but he was otherwise competent in his role. 

I believe the 1933 Bentley was an inspired choice as Crowley's automobile. It had far more personality, presence and smoother lines than the 1926 Bentley in the novel.

 

If there is any person who does not know the story from Pratchett and Gaiman's novel: It is time for Armageddon but an angel and a demon who have been close since the whole Garden-of-Eden thing conspire to prevent it.

I will give warning that any person who is allergic to sarcasm must avoid this mini-series at all costs.

The CGI is minimal through most of the story but there is such an excessive use of CGI flames in the final episode as well as a near-cartoonish depiction of Satan that I must subtract rating points for it.

My overall rating is therefore: 11 out of 13.

 

 

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On 8/17/2020 at 12:16 PM, speedracer5 said:

 

 

I was already going to record McCabe and Mrs. Miller on Warren Beatty's day (which I think is tomorrow).  This film is part of the Criterion collection and I'd always been intrigued by it. I'm glad to see two positive recommendations for this film.

I have Darling recorded on my DVR.  I hadn't seen it yet.

I also haven't seen Heaven Can Wait, but I did see that it was on HBO Max.  The Parallax View (which was recommended to me earlier) is also on HBO Max.

Re: Doctor Zhivago.  I haven't seen this one, but it does seem to be on TCM all the time.  I wish David Lean hadn't segued so heavily into these epic films.  I really enjoyed Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit and Summertime

When I saw your earlier post about Julie Christie, the immediate film that came to mind was Far from the Madding Crowd (1967). Excellent cast (Terence Stamp, Alan Bates, and Peter Finch), beautiful music, and gorgeous Dorset scenery. It is a faithful and thorough adaptation of Thomas Hardy's great novel. One of my favorites.

CinemaInternational, glad to hear you are fond of it as well. Great film.

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We just finished the first episode of HBO's PERRY MASON on Demand. We waited until it played out so we could binge watch several episodes at one sitting. We're not giving up on it, but I was disappointed. As a big fan of the old Raymond Burr TV show, It's hard to tie this adaptation to those episodes as well as the Gardner novels. I get that over 60 years has past. Today's shows, movies and mini-series all feature much more stark realism.  We really like Matthew Rhys and I thought he would be great in the role as I imagined it would be.  Hopefully, it will get better. Please let me know what you think without giving away any spoilers if possible.

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I stayed up to a quarter to 6 in the morning last night to see all of The Fortune (1975). It was one of the rare Warren Beatty films I had not seen, and I was curious about it being one of those big budget, big name films that was all but buried. It was a strange film, and not quite a good one (a sleazy air and a meandering plot ended up moving it into the almost pile), but it was worth staying up for for a few reasons. First of all the film looked gorgeous, the lighting, the costumes, the sets, they really got across the feel of the 1920s, coupled with songs from the period. Jack Nicholson occasionally had that wild, lurid gleam in his eye, Beatty was low-key, Florence Stanley was fun briefly as a nosy landlady, but everyone paled next to the exceptional Stockard Channing. This was early in her career, yet she gave an incredibly, very funny performance, and she really helped to paper over the movie's flaws whenever she was on screen.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

I stayed up to a quarter to 6 in the morning last night to see all of The Fortune (1975). It was one of the rare Warren Beatty films I had not seen, and I was curious about it being one of those big budget, big name films that was all but buried. It was a strange film, and not quite a good one (a sleazy air and a meandering plot ended up moving it into the almost pile), but it was worth staying up for for a few reasons. First of all the film looked gorgeous, the lighting, the costumes, the sets, they really got across the feel of the 1920s, coupled with songs from the period. Jack Nicholson occasionally had that wild, lurid gleam in his eye, Beatty was low-key, Florence Stanley was fun briefly as a nosy landlady, but everyone paled next to the exceptional Stockard Channing. This was early in her career, yet she gave an incredibly, very funny performance, and she really helped to paper over the movie's flaws whenever she was on screen.

In My earlier post discussing the oddities about THE FIRST WIVES CLUB, I should’ve also mentioned how freaking weird it is to have Stockard Channing in One scene at the beginning of your movie and have  her utter no lines on camera.

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