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20 hours ago, SansFin said:

David Tennant is perfect as a demon. I believe the most telling moments are not when he is actively wicked but instead are in the way he is so casually evil. He carries an aura of devilish delight in even the most neutral act. I was not a fan of the CGI done on his eyes 

Wonderfully put about Tennant's Crowley being  "casually evil.".   He's the reason I watched Good Omens.  I wish he'd pop up in more things.  He was the best part of Jessica Jones as the mysterious and menacing Kilgrave.  I ended up just fast forwarding to his scenes and completely gave up on the show once he was gone.    Tennant also had a podcast (" David Tennant Does a Podcast With...") and interviewed Michael Sheen.  They were very engaging and seemed to  really enjoy talking together.

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I had never seen Bugsy, which I liked much better than expected. Great set design (won the Oscar, much deserved), excellent score by Ennio Morricone. The cinematography is actually similar to much work being done today (which I often do not like), except done with far more talent and taste. I like Beatty's performances best when he has a strong director (Kazan, Frankenheimer), and I can add Barry Levinson to that list. Levinson, not Beatty, seems to be in charge, and that is a good thing. I like Beatty's performances least when he directs himself or when a director gives him leeway to be as mannered and movie star Method-y as he wants to be (Altman in McCabe and Mrs. Miller). Beatty may sometimes overact in Bugsy, but Levinson doesn't let him interrupt the rhythm of the film, and that's the key.

Annette Bening (as Virginia Hill) is a good foil for Beatty, and Ben Kingsley (Meyer Lansky), Harvey Keitel (Mickey Cohen), and Elliott Gould (Harry Greenberg) couldn't be better. Kingsley is simply wonderful, and it's almost impossible to figure out why he's so believable. Elliott Gould isn't on screen very long, but he makes a big impression.

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7 hours ago, Peebs said:

I wish he'd pop up in more things.

 

I thank you for your kind words.

I was very lucky to be fan of Doctor Who and so had five years of him as The Doctor. I had seen little of him prior to that but I did like him very much. I knew he would make an excellent Doctor and there are those who vociferously claim that he is the best Doctor of the reboot. 

 

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5 hours ago, SansFin said:

I thank you for your kind words.

I was very lucky to be fan of Doctor Who and so had five years of him as The Doctor. I had seen little of him prior to that but I did like him very much. I knew he would make an excellent Doctor and there are those who vociferously claim that he is the best Doctor of the reboot. 

 

Yes!  He's my favorite Doctor of the reboot.   I did enjoy the others, Matt Smith being second.  The jury's still out on the current incarnation, for me, the writing's not there.

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12 hours ago, Peebs said:

Wonderfully put about Tennant's Crowley being  "casually evil.".   He's the reason I watched Good Omens.  I wish he'd pop up in more things.  He was the best part of Jessica Jones as the mysterious and menacing Kilgrave.  I ended up just fast forwarding to his scenes and completely gave up on the show once he was gone.    Tennant also had a podcast (" David Tennant Does a Podcast With...") and interviewed Michael Sheen.  They were very engaging and seemed to  really enjoy talking together.

I know there's still time, but I kind of thought DAVID TENNANT would've been a BIGGER STAR WORLDWIDE than he is at present (not that he isn't a big star, but to me he has the stuff to really take it to the next level of LEADING MAN STARDOM.)

I can't stand MATT SMITH though.

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11 hours ago, kingrat said:

I had never seen Bugsy, which I liked much better than expected. Great set design (won the Oscar, much deserved), excellent score by Ennio Morricone. The cinematography is actually similar to much work being done today (which I often do not like), except done with far more talent and taste

I'm curious about this. Care to elaborate?

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6 hours ago, Peebs said:

Yes!  He's my favorite Doctor of the reboot.   I did enjoy the others, Matt Smith being second.  The jury's still out on the current incarnation, for me, the writing's not there.

It is my opinion that the difference between Tennant and Smith is the difference between Shakespeare and Wodehouse. The former is more memorable but there are times when you just need zany.

Writing is all. David Tennant's first episode hearkened back to the alien invasion menace of the original series and allowed him to be both very serious and a loon. Matt Smith's first episode was of a single alien foe who was somewhat cartoonish and it was outlandish absurdity all the way through. The Eleventh Hour is my favoritest episode of both old and new series.

I have seen only one season of the current Doctor. I will have to wait for later seasons to appear on DVD before I can watch them as we do not have access to any channels which carry current seasons. It is my understanding that both the show runner and the star are so disappointed with the BBC-mandated stories that they will be leaving when their contracts expire.

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I know there's still time, but I kind of thought DAVID TENNANT would've been a BIGGER STAR WORLDWIDE than he is at present (not that he isn't a big star, but to me he has the stuff to really take it to the next level of LEADING MAN STARDOM.)

I can't stand MATT SMITH though.

I believe that David Tennant choses roles based on what he can put into them and what he can get out of them. It is sad to say that this has not yet included a movie or series which was suitable to propelling him to great heights.

Doctor Who gave him a certain level of worldwide fame but it also typecast him for many people. I find it oddly amusing that he had a major role in: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) but the use of Polyjuice Potion meant that a different actor portrayed his character in the majority of the scenes.

I feel that David Tennant is a far superior actor but I like Matt Smith a little more. It is much like when I have to make a choice to watch either Mark Rylance as Olivia in: Twelfth Night or two hours of kitten videos.  It is part of my nature that it will be cats all the way.

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47 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It is my opinion that the difference between Tennant and Smith is the difference between Shakespeare and Wodehouse.

Very clever, I never thought of it that way.    I loved that their storyline threads would weave through out the season.  Also, both Doctors had great chemistry with their companions and had truly creepy baddies.  The most recent seasons are lacking in all of these.     

 

47 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It is my understanding that both the show runner and the star are so disappointed with the BBC-mandated stories that they will be leaving when their contracts expire.

Interesting, I hadn't heard that.   Strange that they wouldn't give the show runner more freedom.  Maybe that explains the clunky, heavy handiness of many of the episodes.   Well, I wonder what direction the show will go after Jodi Whittaker.  Is there anyone you'd like to see as the next Doctor?

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2 hours ago, SansFin said:

I believe that David Tennant choses roles based on what he can put into them and what he can get out of them. It is sad to say that this has not yet included a movie or series which was suitable to propelling him to great heights.

Doctor Who gave him a certain level of worldwide fame but it also typecast him for many people. I find it oddly amusing that he had a major role in: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) but the use of Polyjuice Potion meant that a different actor portrayed his character in the majority of the scenes.

I feel that David Tennant is a far superior actor but I like Matt Smith a little more. It is much like when I have to make a choice to watch either Mark Rylance as Olivia in: Twelfth Night or two hours of kitten videos.  It is part of my nature that it will be cats all the way.

I have not seen the whole thing, just certain scenes, but Tennant did a really good HAMLET for BBC

(Or he was really good in the scenes I saw, I should say. Very different approach to the character than has been taken before.)

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I prefer Tom Baker as Dr. Who.  David Tennant seems to be doing okay (even though he may not be a household name in the USA).

Last night, I watched Master Chef (US Version).  A couple of comments - What good does throwing an expensive piece of salmon (Gordon Ramsey).  Also, sometimes I think cooking shows et elia are rigged.  There is a lanky, good looking, young blonde woman who keeps landing on the bottom.  She cries multiple tears.  The young Asian gentleman who was eliminated didn't deserve to be so.  At first, my Mom and I thought the three chefs came to their senses.  But, alas, she was spared to make mistakes on the next show.  If Gordon R. seemed to be unhappy with the result, as he was going to arrange an apprenticeship for the young chef.

Tonight, putting Sinbad the Sailor on for my Mom (it is on TCM on demand).

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4 hours ago, SansFin said:

Doctor Who gave him a certain level of worldwide fame but it also typecast him for many people. I find it oddly amusing that he had a major role in: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) but the use of Polyjuice Potion meant that a different actor portrayed his character in the majority of the scenes.

I feel that David Tennant is a far superior actor but I like Matt Smith a little more. It is much like when I have to make a choice to watch either Mark Rylance as Olivia in: Twelfth Night or two hours of kitten videos.  It is part of my nature that it will be cats all the way.

As Doctor, Tennant was the bright and canonically-faithful spot of a series I otherwise loathed, and spiritually closest to the oddball-genius Tom Baker years when Douglas Adams was story consultant, and it showed.  (Qv.  reader theories about who "Hitchhiker"'s Ford Prefect, quote-fingers, "really" is....)

As Bartie Crouch Jr., Tennant has a great bat****-crazy look that makes for a good villain, even though, yes, that was mostly a don't-blink stunt-casting scene in Pt. 4 and afterwards, when we were overstocked for villains.

There's a David Tennant RSC Hamlet somewhere on the British-theater-video ether, and wouldn't mind looking that one up, for above stated reasons.  👍 💀

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4 hours ago, Peebs said:

Also, both Doctors had great chemistry with their companions and had truly creepy baddies.  The most recent seasons are lacking in all of these.     

Interesting, I hadn't heard that.   Strange that they wouldn't give the show runner more freedom.  Maybe that explains the clunky, heavy handiness of many of the episodes.   Well, I wonder what direction the show will go after Jodi Whittaker.  Is there anyone you'd like to see as the next Doctor?

I believe that Amy Pond had the most interesting relationship with The Doctor because she is the only one to both feed him fish fingers and custard and to hit him with a cricket bat.  

I know that I have watched all of Season Eleven but I am sorry to say that the only foe which I remember is spiders. The others were clearly not in the same league with the Vashta Nerada, the Silence or the Weeping Angels.

The situation seems to have changed since I last read of it. The show runner is staying but Jodie Whittaker did indeed quit at the end of the current season.

https://www.doctorwhotv.co.uk/jodie-quits-julia-foster-is-the-14th-doctor-with-david-tennant-as-companion-93578.htm

This is the first that I have read that David Tennant is returning!

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Shadow of the Vampire (2000)

Intriguing fanciful take on film history dealing with the making of the legendary German silent Nosferatu, the first vampire film of the movies. The screenplay's take is that director F. W. Murnau knowingly hired, in the mysterious Max Schreck, a real vampire, who threatens to feast upon crew members as Murnau is determined to finish his film.

There are some impressive recreations of scenes from the Murnau classic in a film that frequently establishes an eerie feeling. John Malkovich does his usual solid work as Murnau but it's Willem Dafoe, as the vampiric Shreck, who mesmerizes the screen with his bizarre portrayal. There is even a little dark humour to be found here, on occasion.

Among other things this film put me in a mood to watch Nosferatu again. But, above all, even without having seen the original silent classic, Dafoe's performance makes for compulsive viewing.

000358_1228x691_696096_036.jpg

3 out of 4

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6 minutes ago, SansFin said:

The situation seems to have changed since I last read of it. The show runner is staying but Jodie Whittaker did indeed quit at the end of the current season.

https://www.doctorwhotv.co.uk/jodie-quits-julia-foster-is-the-14th-doctor-with-david-tennant-as-companion-93578.htm

This is the first that I have read that David Tennant is returning!

I think this might be a little wishful thinking on a fansite.  I tried searching for any similar articles but the most I could find was that the two male companions are out and that Jodie and Chibnalll are doing another season.  No talk of Tennant returning.   I guess we'll see what happens...

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3 hours ago, Peebs said:

I think this might be a little wishful thinking on a fansite.  I tried searching for any similar articles but the most I could find was that the two male companions are out and that Jodie and Chibnalll are doing another season.  No talk of Tennant returning.   I guess we'll see what happens...

I see now that that information is wrong. My only defense is that I was searching for articles more than a year old and the first hit contradicted and seemed to update the information from that time and so I went with it rather than searching further because reading about Doctor Who is a rabbit hole I do not want to go down at this moment.

 

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I just watched my TCM recording of Fritz Lang's YOU AND ME '38 from Sylvia Sidney day. Who could resist a movie with George Raft as a gangster set to Kurt Weill music directed by Fritz Lang? A recipe for a delightful disaster!

This starts out rather typically with the crazy story of a large Main Street Department store whose owner hires ex-cons to give them their first break back into straight society. While a very worthwhile concept, you just know there will be trouble. But being 1938, the convicts are bumbling, lovable saps, winning your support.

George Raft is a little more hardened & suspicious than Sylvia Sydney (who always seems to remind me of Janet Gaynor) but they try to make a go of it with a quickie marriage. Lang clumsily tells the audience she too is a parolee and of course Raft misconstrues the clues & relapses. Predictable hilarity and heavy handed morality ensues. 

What makes this movie great, is the notable musical interludes. They are as oddly executed & placed as a Bollywood Horror film. The opening is a montage of department store items to a cash register with "You gotta PAY for it!" which at first it cute. But it goes on & on & the cash registers get bigger & bigger. And the desirable items they list as "must haves" gets more ludicrous-

Cheese & roses, snowshoes & statues, perfume & pistols, piccolos & dynamos, garbage cans & feather fans, candy sticks & building bricks, silver chests & movie sets....! Thank you Sam Coslow, lyricist. 

The other standout is Warren Hymer in a typical goofball gangster portrayal. It's a pretty heavy handed film, but boy, I sure loved it.

Warren-Hymer-new-pic-1.jpg

YouAndMePoster.jpg

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just watched my TCM recording of Fritz Lang's YOU AND ME '38 from Sylvia Sidney day. Who could resist a movie with George Raft as a gangster set to Kurt Weill music directed by Fritz Lang? A recipe for a delightful disaster!

This starts out rather typically with the crazy story of a large Main Street Department store whose owner hires ex-cons to give them their first break back into straight society. While a very worthwhile concept, you just know there will be trouble. But being 1938, the convicts are bumbling, lovable saps, winning your support.

George Raft is a little more hardened & suspicious than Sylvia Sydney (who always seems to remind me of Janet Gaynor) but they try to make a go of it with a quickie marriage. Lang clumsily tells the audience she too is a parolee and of course Raft misconstrues the clues & relapses. Predictable hilarity and heavy handed morality ensues. 

What makes this movie great, is the notable musical interludes. They are as oddly executed & placed as a Bollywood Horror film. The opening is a montage of department store items to a cash register with "You gotta PAY for it!" which at first it cute. But it goes on & on & the cash registers get bigger & bigger. And the desirable items they list as "must haves" gets more ludicrous-

Cheese & roses, snowshoes & statues, perfume & pistols, piccolos & dynamos, garbage cans & feather fans, candy sticks & building bricks, silver chests & movie sets....! Thank you Sam Coslow, lyricist. 

Kind'a makes ya wonder if maybe after he watched this movie, it might have inspired Steven Bochco to come up with one of the oddest and biggest flops in television history, doesn't it.

(...you know...Cop Rock)

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A slightly off-topic remark.  I don't think I saw one person own up to watching the Democratic Virtual Convention.  I saw snippets, but it wasn't the same as in years past.  Problem for me was too many canned speeches that were previewed in advance and dragging out celebrities have little, if any, political sway.  Now, Oprah is another story.

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I've been trying to expand my viewing of 1970s films.  I really like this era of filmmaking.  Recently  I've been on a Robert Redford kick.  HBO MAX has a lot of his films available.  

The Candidate (1972)

Source: HBO Max

Full disclosure.  I've seen this movie before, so it wasn't a first time watch for me.  However, on the second viewing, I hadn't realized how prescient The Candidate was in regard to political campaigns.  I found many aspects of the film to be very timely.  In The Candidate, Robert Redford plays Bill McKay, a lawyer from San Diego who catches the attention of Marvin Lucas (Peter Boyle), an election specialist who is tasked with finding a Democratic candidate for a California senate  seat.  Lucas needs to find a candidate who could run up against Crocker Jarmon (Don Porter, aka Sally Field's dad in "Gidget.").  Prior to finding McKay, Lucas was having trouble finding a viable candidate.  It is assumed that Republican Jarmon will win by a landslide and nobody wants to campaign in a supposed unwinnable race.  To convince McKay to run for Senator, Lucas tells him that he can say and do whatever he wants--as it doesn't matter, because it's obvious that Jarmon  will win. 

McKay easily wins the Democratic nomination over some other potential candidates, mainly due to his father being popular former California Governor John J. McKay (Melvyn Douglas). After cobbling together a small grassroots campaign, McKay seemingly is gaining  traction with his constituents, but soon polls are showing that he is going to be clobbered in the election.  Not wanting his candidate humiliated, Lucas tells McKay that they need to put together a more traditional campaign so that his loss will look more respectable.  Soon, there's an entire staff working the "McKay: The Better Way" campaign.  He has a campaign headquarters.  He is appearing at organized speaking events and other traditional campaign events.  Soon, McKay's spontaneous, off-the-cuff messages are soon being edited, censored, manipulated, etc.  McKay's dynamic, timely campaign platform, the one that attracted his supporters in the first place, is slowly devolving into a generic blah blah blah talking head type campaign.  You know, those campaigns that everyone  runs these days, and have run for years--the campaign where it seems like a lot of promises are being made, but in reality the candidate is saying NOTHING. 

As the film progresses, McKay becomes more and more disillusioned with Lucas' direction for his campaign and the image of himself  that is being put forth to the public.  McKay doesn't want to be a generic politician like Crocker Jarmon.  He has real concerns and campaign platforms, mostly dealing with environment and programs for society.  During a debate, after Crocker Jarmon makes yet another speech pandering to his supporters, McKay is over it and explodes on camera.  McKay, who up until this point was giving pre-scripted Lucas-approved answers to debate questions, goes on a diatribe.  He blasts Jarmon and the debate moderators for neglecting to mention any of the real issues, e.g. poverty and race relations, that affect society.  He then says something to the effect that we've (Americans) been ignoring these issues year after year.  No matter who is in charge, these issues are never addressed and never improve. (Hmm... sound familiar?)

The Candidate was a very timely film and I felt depicted political campaigns very well. The candidate isn't running  on his or her own merit or soapbox.  He or she is there to present a pre-crafted, pandering message that hits all the talking points, but is really nothing  of any substance.  There is no real desire to change the country, just a desire to win.  Both Jarmon and McKay employ one of politicians' favorite tactics: presenting a multi-point "plan" with a cute name to make it seem like they are going to fix an issue, but in reality, nothing ever happens.  Throughout this COVID crisis, we were presented with numerous multi-point plans with cute names, at all levels: federal, state, and local.  And what happened with these plans? Nothing.

I really enjoyed The Candidate and have watched it twice now.  I would most definitely watch it again and I am not into politics in the slightest.  I liked this film because it showed the good things that politicians can do; but it also showcased how many politicians are just a crock of [blank]. 

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Man Bait Poster

Man Bait (1952) TCM 7/10

A book dealer (George Brent) and his pretty shopgirl (Diana Dors) employee are drawn into a deadly blackmail plot.

A first time viewing for me, this was an entertaining British thriller with a lot of talent involved. It was directed by Terence Fisher who would later direct many the best Hammer horror films. The writer was Frederick  Knott who wrote two classics of suspense Dial M For Murder and Wait Until Dark. Brent is very good in one of his later roles after his glory days in the 1930s and 1940s. This was part of SUTS day for Dors, and she is listed in the credits as "introducing" when she had appeared in many films before this. It is interesting seeing her in this role, she is quite demure and sweet but is forced by a creep (Peter Reynolds) into a life of crime. It is so different from many of her later roles where she is often the scheming, seductive platinum blonde. 

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7 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

A slightly off-topic remark.  I don't think I saw one person own up to watching the Democratic Virtual Convention.  I saw snippets, but it wasn't the same as in years past.  Problem for me was too many canned speeches that were previewed in advance and dragging out celebrities have little, if any, political sway.  Now, Oprah is another story.

I loved it.  I want MORE virtual conventions, and I want them to retire that "arena" nonsense.  The Democratic party is seen as a "democratic" grass-roots one, and their party-platform rollout worked better as a combination Skype-interview show and thrown-together celebrity hurricane-charity benefit show.  Sort of the political equivalent of one of those living-room Disney Singalong specials.

I spent several elections growing up, wanting to strangle those delegates who kept fifteen-seconds-of-fame camera-hogging their state's pride on the arena floor before giving their ballot*, and the "Hello from (my state)!" videos were the perfect antidote.  

Trump, imitating what he sees from other presidents on TV, is going to cram his followers into a disease-filled room with balloons, put on the world's biggest vanity-staged Virus Briefing, MyPillow Guy included, so that the entire party can chant his name and old '16 slogans, and...oh, can we just vote now?    😂

---

* - You remember:
"Illinois, land of Lincoln and home to the great city of Chicago, gives their votes for Joe Biden!"

"Indiana, home of fast cars and good times, gives their votes for Joe Biden!

"Iowa, where we make those...y'know, those little ball bearings, in your car, when they--"

"--Kansas makes them too!"

"(pause)....Iowa passes?"

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Young and Willing Poster

The Weak And The Wicked (1954) TCM 7/10

A woman (Glynis Johns) is framed for fraud and sent to prison for a year.

This was a episodic but entertaining women's prison film with surprising humor. It is definitely does not have the brutality and grittiness of Caged (1950). We meet a few other inmates and get flashbacks with some of their stories. Funniest one is a one woman who comes from a family of bumbling shoplifters. The most tragic is one of a mother who leaves her two young children alone one night. Most memorable is an ironic story of two elderly women who plot the murder of the husband of one of them. Diana Dors plays the close friend and fellow inmate of Johns, however we don't get any backstory on her. Rachel Roberts has an early role as a tough talking pregnant inmate.

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