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On 8/19/2020 at 3:20 PM, Hoganman1 said:

We just finished the first episode of HBO's PERRY MASON on Demand. We waited until it played out so we could binge watch several episodes at one sitting. We're not giving up on it, but I was disappointed. As a big fan of the old Raymond Burr TV show, It's hard to tie this adaptation to those episodes as well as the Gardner novels. I get that over 60 years has past. Today's shows, movies and mini-series all feature much more stark realism.  We really like Matthew Rhys and I thought he would be great in the role as I imagined it would be.  Hopefully, it will get better. Please let me know what you think without giving away any spoilers if possible.

No takers on PERRY MASON, huh? Oh well, I guess that in itself tells me something. We'll probably finish watching it once we get through YELLOWSTONE Season 3. 

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I actually watched several episodes of HBO's Perry Mason.  I didn't care for it.  I would have liked to have seen what Robert Downey Jr. did with the role (he was originally slated to play it).  I can still catch up with it; however, I don't think E.S. Gardner would have cared for it.  Coincidentally, my Mom's currently watching the updated Perry Masons on one of the Hallmark channels.

Last night, watched Love with a Proper Stranger on TCM Demand.  The two leads were great and what a touching story.  Interesting commentary from Ben M. on why Steve McQueen wanted the role.

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12 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

vincent-price-o-rly.gif

Yes, RLY, Fortunato:  "Boy" has the psychedelic filler scenes (I remember truncated TV airings always cutting out the quasi-Fantasia scene where Schroeder plays Beethoven), but Snoopy Come Home is one of the lesser Sherman Bros. post-Disney musicals that spent its time on the hot 70's Snoopy marketing, and by the time Paramount got to Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown (1977), they were just cranking them out on the TV assembly line.

12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"ARE YOU SAYING *I* KILLED LORD MORLEY?"

"NO, I'm sayin' you KILL ME!"

"'Hilda is dead, and here's something to note. You can't bury her at sea, 'cause her bosoms will float.'...Well, that rhymed."

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Just a minor correction--it's Love With The Proper Stranger. Very good movie for sure. I've always

been interested in these early 1960s flicks that are caught between two worlds--the dying one of

old timey values and the coming of the later 1960s sexual "revolution." They wouldn't show a trip

to the abortionist in the former and Wood's and McQueen's affair would likely be somewhat more

explicit in the latter. 

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7 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

No takers on PERRY MASON, huh? Oh well, I guess that in itself tells me something. We'll probably finish watching it once we get through YELLOWSTONE Season 3. 

I don't get HBO.  I love the Perry Mason stories, in general though.

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On 8/24/2020 at 2:56 PM, EricJ said:

When John Barry died a few years ago, half of the obits identified him as the 007 composer, and the other half, for some reason, identified him as the "Raise the Titanic" composer.

For years, the one "To Cornwall" cue (just before the hero meets Alec Guinness) was stuck in my head from the trailer, but I never actually got to see the film until Lord Grade's pre-AFD ITC movies started joining the Streaming Orphans on Amazon.  And yes, apart from Guinness, the only watchable relief from terminal boredom is that great titular Barry-goes-to-town climax where the ship finally arrives in NYC...Makes an old NY'er misty 😥 :

 

1:  Xanadu, Somewhere in Time, Melvin & Howard, The Shining, Ordinary People, The Last Metro, Superman II, My Bodyguard, The Blues Brothers, Stardust Memories, Resurrection, Gregory's Girl,

2: Hopscotch, The Elephant Man, Atlantic City, Coal Miner's Daughter, Airplane!, The Empire Strikes Back, How to Beat the High Cost of Living, Bronco Billy, The Earthling, Bon Voyage Charlie Brown, It's My Turn,

3: Fatso, Popeye, Inside Moves, Kagemusha, The Watcher in the Woods, The Mirror Crack'd, Tell Me a Riddle, Hide in Plain Sight, Private Benjamin, The Formula, The Competition, Seems Like Old Times,

4: The Man with Bogart's Face, The Stunt Man, Breaker Morant, The Long Good Friday, Raging Bull, Jane Austen in Manhattan, Honeysuckle Rose, Fame, Raise the Titanic.

 

I've actually seen 19 of these films, if memory serves, as well as Tess and Mon Oncle d'Amerique (both highly recommended). 1980 was a very good year. Just films 2-6 on row 2--The Elephant Man, Atlantic City, Coal Miner's Daughter, Airplane!, and The Empire Strikes Back--would have made for a good year. The Competition is one of the best failure fantasies.

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15 hours ago, midwestan said:

I don't get HBO.  I love the Perry Mason stories, in general though.

As the saying goes "this isn't your father's (or mother's) Perry Mason". I watched episode 2 last night and it's getting better. I think it's actually a neo-noir. It reminds me of LA CONFIDENTIAL and THE BLACK DAILIA both of which I liked. As a fan of both the Raymond Burr TV show and made for TV movies, I anxious to see how this seedy detective becomes a prominent lawyer. Also, I wonder how they plan to develop his relationship with both Della Street and Paul Drake. While I too doubt this is what Earl Stanley Gardner had in mind, my curiosity out weighs my desire for literary accuracy. If you have access to HBO I suggest you give it a look. If nothing else it's a nice distraction from COVID and politics. 

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I watched two Chinese-themed films. Each runs 62 minutes. Although I enjoyed them, I think they could have benefitted from a longer running time. In each, the Chinese leading characters are the protagonists. The bad guys are Caucasian.

Phantom of Chinatown (1940)

After several films in which Boris Karloff played the Chinese detective Mr. Wong, an actual Chinese-American is cast in the role: Keye Luke.  The film, which takes places largely in San Francisco,  has a rather murky plot, opening with an excavation of a Chinese emperor's tomb.  Although the film sets you up to expect something of the nature of the Curse of the Seven Jackals of Mummy fame, it's actually a much more prosaic story about a scroll holding the secret to an oil reserve.  Back in the states, there are murders and intrigue. Although there are the usual Chinese stereotypes , there are actually positive depictions: the two Chinese leads (Keye Luke, Lotus Long) are the sensible characters. At one point, Wong has to phone a venerable man in Chinatown late at night. His language reflects the Chinese respect for the aged:

"Chinatown exchange please. This is James Lee Wong. Revered elder, please. Greetings. Only the eyebrows of youth would have the temerity to call the beard of age at such an hour.:"

The story is wound up rather quickly and would have benefitted from more clarity in the plot; nevertheless it's a pretty good film. Although I'm not one of those who believes the actor has to be the ethnicity that he/she portrays, it is commendable that, in 1940, two actors were given the opportunity to do so.

714VvXjuBfL._RI_.jpg

Daughter of Shanghai (1937)

I don't recall having seen many Anna May Wong movies, apart from Shanghai Express. I tried to watch Piccadilly recently but found the modern music score to be unbearable. Daughter of Shanghai opens with a harrowing scene: Fearing capture by U.S. government agents, evil white traffickers in illegal immigrants, flying a plane, drop a "cargo" of hopeful Chinese immigrants into the sea. The scene switches to Anna May Wong's father's shop. He's an importer of Chinese goods and is secretly fighting the alien-smuggling ring. He is kidnapped and murdered, although his daughter escapes and begins her fight against the bad white guys, aided by a U.S agent played by Philip Ahn. The two leads are great, and Anna May Wong, having to take a job as a dancer in a seedy cafe in the Caribbean, gets to display her dancing skills. Although there's not enough time in this short film to flesh out what might have been a movie of substance, it's a good movie that presents Chinese and Chinese American characters in positive, well-rounded roles. The evil leader of the smuggling gang turns out to be a society woman, well played by Cecil Cunningham. I wonder if Hitchcock got the idea for the Alma Kruger character in Saboteur (1942) from the Cecil Cunningham character in Daughter of Shanghai.

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Last night, we watched Anne of Green Gables, from which Anne Shirley got her name.  Got her confused with Anne (sp?) Sheridan, whom my Mom once saw walking in Manhattan many years ago.  She said she was gorgeous.  As for Anne of Green Gables, I never read the book and the movie was okay.  I actually visited the house in PEI back in the 1970's.  There was a bunker right in front of the house and the golfers (among whom my Dad was one) didn't like that everyone was using the bunker (ergo creating footprints) to take pictures.

Who knows what we will watch today.  I'm still upset about the results of Master Chef last week, but I kind of like the show.  Wish they were showing Rebecca for Lord Olivier's day.  My Mom saw Olivier and Vivian Leigh in Romeo and Juliet in NYC; she said they were both gorgeous and they "lusted" after one another.

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night, we watched Anne of Green Gables, from which Anne Shirley got her name.  Got her confused with Anne (sp?) Sheridan, whom my Mom once saw walking in Manhattan many years ago.  She said she was gorgeous.  As for Anne of Green Gables, I never read the book and the movie was okay.  I actually visited the house in PEI back in the 1970's.  There was a bunker right in front of the house and the golfers (among whom my Dad was one) didn't like that everyone was using the bunker (ergo creating footprints) to take pictures.

 

I caught this one THANKSGIVING, it is really, REALLY good and HELEN WESTLEY as the PRICKLY AUNT MARILLA) is an actress worth looking for (she made a few other film appearances, mostly period pieces.) The actor playing her brother played the blind hermit in BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

ps- Thanks for the poster who cited my earlier error

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On 8/25/2020 at 10:23 AM, Hoganman1 said:

No takers on PERRY MASON, huh? Oh well, I guess that in itself tells me something. We'll probably finish watching it once we get through YELLOWSTONE Season 3. 

I have watched all of Season 1 and really liked it. It has an excellent cast including the great Welsh actor Matthew Rhys, and John Lithgow . If you watched the TV Series, it may help to forget you ever saw it or pretend that the protagonist here is not named Perry Mason.  I have never read any of the Gardner novels, but I am sure he never conceived of Paul Drake as black or Della Street as a lesbian. It is set in 1932.  Mason starts out as a PI who suffers from "shell shock"  with Lithgow as his lawyer employer and mentor. Other characters include Sister Alice (think Aimee Semple McPherson) and other members of her religious sect) and a rather bizarre plot. I will avoid spoilers other than to say that no one breaks down on the witness stand and confesses.

As for Yellowstone, I watched it for a couple of seasons and quit. I do not like Kevin Costner or the Cliven Bundy character he portrays in that series.

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The Man Who Never Was (FX Retro)

Solid WWII yarn, based upon an actual incident in which the British try to dupe the Germans into thinking an invasion is coming to Greece instead of Sicily. The Royal Navy obtains the corpse of a recently deceased lad, dresses him up as a naval officer, locks a briefcase (containing phony invasion plans) to his wrist, and "arranges" to have his body wash ashore. The Germans send an agent to England to investigate whether the "officer" is legitimate or not.

Clifton Webb, as the British officer who concocts the plot, gives a fine performance. He looks quite distinguished with a beard, and … dare I say it … even handsome. His scene with the dead man’s father is very poignant, when he assures the man his son’s body will be handled with dignity. The final scene is touching. Stephen Boyd, in one of his earliest roles, also scores well as the German agent.

This is a film I’ve always wanted to see, so I was glad to catch it. Definitely worth watching, and refreshing to see Webb as a likeable sort, for a change.

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14 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night, we watched Anne of Green Gables, from which Anne Shirley got her name.  Got her confused with Anne (sp?) Sheridan, whom my Mom once saw walking in Manhattan many years ago.  She said she was gorgeous.  As for Anne of Green Gables, I never read the book and the movie was okay.  I actually visited the house in PEI back in the 1970's.  There was a bunker right in front of the house and the golfers (among whom my Dad was one) didn't like that everyone was using the bunker (ergo creating footprints) to take pictures.

 

I read  Anne of Green Gables, at the perfect age to read it - when I was a kid, about 10. I loved it, I read it at least twice. Then I went on to read just about everything L.M. Montgomery wrote.  I loved all her books.   I haven't thought of them in ages.  I remember they meant a lot to me when I was a young kid and a teenager. However, it may be that they are best appreciated at a young age, I don't know if you read Anne now if it would resonate with you the same way it would have if you'd read it at the age of 12 or so.

ps:  I 've seen the movie.  It was ok, but diverged quite a bit from the book, which is not uncommon of course with Hollywood versions of books.

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I didn't know whether to make this its own thread (since that's really for TCM content)--

But lately on YouTube, with everyone indoors, the latest Millennial/Gen-Z search for YouTubers to say "Look, I'm doing something wacky and unlikely that my parents used to do, watch my reaction!" has been for Z'ers to watch classic pop-culture movies (usually horror, Star Wars, or, if girls, Disney) "For the FIRST TIME!", and that gloriously pimply thrill of Reaction Video.

Usually, most self-absorbed teen-narcissistic YouTube reaction-videos aren't fun unless said slacker thinks he's going to MST3K hip-heckle some "broken" old movie, and ends up utterly hooked, at which point, he pretends he's now teaching us, his followers, about something important he's just discovered.  🤣  The most entertaining so far, since July, has been the channel for "Marco's Movies", where we see a more reasonably game teen watching pop-culture tropes like Ghostbusters, Lion King, and Jaws, etc., for the "first time"...Yes, that's what happens when you don't show them on TV anymore, make fun of DVD, close Blockbusters and mail-Netflix, and spend ten years trying to make them pay $20 for the digital.

And if you think it was fun watching Marco try to figure out The Wizard of Oz's plot for the first time ("Wait, she's just running away?"  "OMG, dude was a total fake all the time!"), enjoy the vicarious proud-film-parent thrill of watching our earnest young new classic-film watcher be totally...TOTALLY...lured in, hook-line-and-sinker, by Hitchcock's bait-and-switches for Psycho:

("Aw, dude, that's so sweet, Norman brought her a sandwich! 🥰 ")  😅

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

I didn't know whether to make this its own thread (since that's really for TCM content)--

But lately on YouTube, with everyone indoors, the latest Millennial/Gen-Z search for YouTubers to say "Look, I'm doing something wacky and unlikely that my parents used to do, watch my reaction!" has been for Z'ers to watch classic pop-culture movies (usually horror, Star Wars, or, if girls, Disney) "For the FIRST TIME!", and that gloriously pimply thrill of Reaction Video.

Usually, most self-absorbed teen-narcissistic YouTube reaction-videos aren't fun unless said slacker thinks he's going to MST3K hip-heckle some "broken" old movie, and ends up utterly hooked, at which point, he pretends he's now teaching us, his followers, about something important he's just discovered.  🤣  The most entertaining so far, since July, has been the channel for "Marco's Movies", where we see a more reasonably game teen watching pop-culture tropes like Ghostbusters, Lion King, and Jaws, etc., for the "first time"...Yes, that's what happens when you don't show them on TV anymore, make fun of DVD, close Blockbusters and mail-Netflix, and spend ten years trying to make them pay $20 for the digital.

And if you think it was fun watching Marco try to figure out The Wizard of Oz's plot for the first time ("Wait, she's just running away?"  "OMG, dude was a total fake all the time!"), enjoy the vicarious proud-film-parent thrill of watching our earnest young new classic-film watcher be totally...TOTALLY...lured in, hook-line-and-sinker, by Hitchcock's bait-and-switches for Psycho:

("Aw, dude, that's so sweet, Norman brought her a sandwich! 🥰 ")  😅

It is a whole genre of YT videos (it's all about getting clicks to get the ad revenue) and it's been going on for awhile.  There's also a another variation of this where "experts" (voice coaches, acting coaches, etc.) critique in real-time other's performances in films, TV shows, videos, etc.

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TOMORROW IS FOREVER (1946)

I always find it riveting.  Hammy, hot with histrionics, but baby NATALIE WOOD screaming and weeping.  GEORGE BRENT once again is the perfect cream in the coffee.  RICHARD LONG is so noble, handsome and young.  ...And he reads THOMAS PAINE !!! 

Today was CLAUDETTE COLBERT day, she is in so many good ones,, but I love that move best for ORSON WELLES !

 

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On 8/1/2020 at 6:06 PM, misswonderly3 said:

That's it?  That's all you have to say about it?  

I didn't really feel like anything I could say about it hasn't been said before. I wasn't really in the mood to discuss it further lol but I can if you want

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2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I didn't really feel like anything I could say about it hasn't been said before. I wasn't really in the mood to discuss it further lol but I can if you want

Oh well.  At least you saw it, and that's a good thing, since it's a very famous and well-regarded movie.  So it's nice that you posted that you'd seen it, anyway.  🙂

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On 8/26/2020 at 9:38 PM, Thenryb said:

 

As for Yellowstone, I watched it for a couple of seasons and quit. I do not like Kevin Costner or the Cliven Bundy character he portrays in that series.

I had to Google Cliven Bundy, but then remembered reading something about him.  I guess John Dutton is cut from the same clothe. My wife commented that YELLOWSTONE is kind of a hard core DALLAS. The only decent character is Kayce and in spite of his wife's influence, he's starting to get "seduced by the dark side". We'll be watching the season three finale tonight. It's pretty rough at times, but we've both enjoyed it. 

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They Only Kill Their Masters (1972)

Mystery about a small town sheriff (James Garner) who is investigating the death of a woman who appears to have been killed by her doberman. Of course, all is not as it initially appears. Katharine Ross appears as a vet assistant who gets into a relationship with Garner (rather abruptly) along with Hal Holbrook as the town veterinarian.

There is a bit of charm to be found in any film in which the police force is so strapped for cash that they have to share two cars and, on occasion, catch a cab in order to get to work. Ultimately the film is disappointing as its story (for me, at least) starts to become a little complicated.

Nevertheless I still found this production a relatively enjoyable experience due to a superior supporting cast of Hollywood veterans, including Tom Ewell, Ann Rutherford, Harry Guardino, Peter Lawford, Arthur O'Connell, Edmond O'Brien and June Allyson.

Even more than that, however, the film benefits from its central casting of Garner as the sheriff. This is not one of the actor's more prestigious roles or films but it's a pleasure to watch him during the peak period of his career as a performer, when his laid back charm, as well as those moments of gentle humour that he could bring to a role, made him one of the most likable and engaging actors to watch on the screen, even in a minor effort such as this. The start of his great TV run in The Rockford Files was only two years away when he appeared in this film.

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2.5 out of 4

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It's a Great Life Poster

It's A Great Life (1943) Movies! TV Network 5/10

Mr Dithers sends Dagwood on a an errand to look into buying a house, but he misunderstands and buys a horse instead.

#13 in the series and the first one without Blondie's name in the title. It's not one of the better entries, but some amusing bits. Cookie is now walking and talking and Alexander getting bigger. The most interesting things are the topical references to WWII where Alexander charges money for kids to whack a picture of Hitler bending over. The guest actor is Hugh Herbert as a scatterbrained client who likes horses.

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I like They Only Kill Their Masters.  But I'm a fan of James Garner.

Last night, watched Now Voyager, which I've seen before.  Good movie and the cigarette lighting scene is iconic.  In the afternoon, caught the Hollow Triumph with Paul H. and Joan B.  I never saw it before.  It is always interesting to find some of these little gems on TCM or other film sources.

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I like They Only Kill Their Masters.  But I'm a fan of James Garner.

 

Outside of those who enjoy watching Hollywood veterans in small parts in a film, I guess that They Only Kill Their Masters will primarily appeal to Garner fans. I've been one ever since I caught Maverick in syndication on TV when I was a kid. He was a very solid actor, of course, capable of playing either comedy or drama. But it was that engaging down to earth personality, coupled with his charm and adroit ability at bringing humour to a scene that made him a unique screen personality and performer.

Even though he was, when he was in his prime years, at least, an incredibly good looking guy Garner came across as a regular guy who was one of us. When he died a few years ago I felt like I had lost a friend.

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