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ps- watching PURPLE NOON, I could not help but recall my similar  feelings in re: another superb Euro-Thriller- THE NIGHT DIGGER (1971) and its female protagonist.  I mean, yes, okay, so he is a sociopathic murderer, but GURL, those EYES!

dapper-devil-alain-delon-purple-noon-196

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On 9/8/2020 at 6:28 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

saw THE TALENTED MR RIPLEY in the theater in 1998 and have not seen it again, still i remember much about it- and i don't recall the towing of the dinghy scene in that film. in a way, it was a FANTASTIC METAPHOR for the relationship between RIPLEY and GREENLEAF.

I also meant to mention that this film contains what amounts to the FIRST ONSCREEN THREESOME THAT I CAN THINK OF, with both male protagonist simultaneously making out with THE WORLD'S LUCKIEST WOMAN in a carriage.

I finished it yesterday and I REALLY, REALLY liked the ending a lot, all the more so since I read that PATRICIA HIGHSMITH did not (but she was surprisingly okay with the rest of it though.) I've read two of her books, neither was THE TALENTED MR RIPLEY- and did not care for either, her style is oppressive and heavy.

I saw a movie in a theater in 1989 with my mother, but did not enter a theater during the 90s at all. So, we (mom and I) ceremoniously went to see The Talented Mr Ripley on Jan 4, 2000. I though it intriguing but there some fuzzy transitions and twists and I wondered whether Minghella might have pulled a fast one by not seeing or caring enough to avoid a super egregious plot hole that had (so I thought) the capability of ruining the entire movie. It's a little fuzzy now but it had something to do with why he did such and such when he didn't know to do that at that time . The question was how did he know that and when did he know it. I wish I could be more specific but it was about the time of the opera scene (on a stairway) and something. I was puzzled walking out of the theater. Some time later I had the DVD and embarked on a mission to give the movie a reality test. After some deliberation I finally let Minghella off the hook but only by a hair. I now want to see again after reading your (lorna) post. I have always thought that this is one of the most superior movies I've ever seen.

Is there a name for someone in a movie who keeps turning up at odd times to simply be a thorn in the side of the protagonist to move the plot along? In the opera Don Giovanni, Elvira is such a person. In TTMR it's Meredith (Cate Blanchett). It's almost comical the way she pops up. Like Elvira, she is a nemesis. Is there a word for someone like. Elvira is a bit calculating but Meredith seems to pop by chance, although she may have been a bit calculating too, I don't remember.  Surely we have a name for like that.

On 9/8/2020 at 6:28 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

finished it yesterday and I REALLY, REALLY liked the ending a lot, all the more so since I read that PATRICIA HIGHSMITH did not (but she was surprisingly okay with the rest of it though.) I've read two of her books, neither was THE TALENTED MR RIPLEY- and did not care for either, her style is oppressive and heavy.

I was anxious to read Ripley to see how it came from the page. I couldn't get through it.

I'm glad you posted this, Lorna ... I need to apprehend this one and give it a view. I want to see what my problem was with the screenplay described above.

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Minghella's version of The Talented Mr. Ripley departs considerably from the novel in its last movement, although it keeps one element of the original which Purple Noon does not. I really like both films, although Purple Noon is special. I've read quite a few of Patricia Highsmith's novels and like most of them, although she is something of an acquired taste for many readers. Some of the books have the unsettling effect of showing how murder eventually becomes just another event in someone's life. French critics generally liked her books better than English or American critics did. Highsmith was primarily lesbian, although she did have affairs with men, and it's interesting that most of her protagonists are male

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I liked The Talented Mr. Ripley (did anyone see the sequel with John M.?). I also like Strangers on a Train.  Never read Highsmith, but she didn't like Jews and she supposedly had the "hots" for Judy Holliday.

If true that's pretty funny considering Judy Holiday was Jewish.

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also meant to mention that this film contains what amounts to the FIRST ONSCREEN THREESOME THAT I CAN THINK OF,

Design for Living (1933) is all about a threesome involving Gary Cooper, Fredric March, and Miriam Hopkins.

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10 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Design for Living (1933) is all about a threesome involving Gary Cooper, Fredric March, and Miriam Hopkins.

Yeah but there’s no literal scene where all three of them are being physically intimate *at the same time*. PURPLE NOON Has a scene in the back of a horse drawn carriage where two men are making out with one woman *at the same time*, each picking a shoulder and side of her neck to kiss. It’s really racy.

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52 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Minghella's version of The Talented Mr. Ripley departs considerably from the novel in its last movement, although it keeps one element of the original which Purple Noon does not. I really like both films, although Purple Noon is special. I've read quite a few of Patricia Highsmith's novels and like most of them, although she is something of an acquired taste for many readers. Some of the books have the unsettling effect of showing how murder eventually becomes just another event in someone's life. French critics generally liked her books better than English or American critics did. Highsmith was primarily lesbian, although she did have affairs with men, and it's interesting that most of her protagonists are male

I apologize because this is sexist, And I don’t think I can entirely fully explain it, but one reason why I don’t like Patricia Highsmith is that she writes more like a man than a woman.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I apologize because this is sexist, And I don’t think I can entirely fully explain it, but one reason why I don’t like Patricia Highsmith is that she writes more like a man than a woman.

She's not the only lesbian writer of her era who writes mostly about male protagonists. Mary Renault and Marguerite Yourcenar come to mind, both of whom write very convincingly about male homosexual love in the ancient world, and in the case of Renault's The Charioteer, the present.

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I watched El Camino (1963) after the Women Directors documentary.  I hadn't expected to like it, but I was charmed and moved by this film, the authenticity of the characters, especially the child actors.  As an ex-Catholic, I was brought back to the humorous awfulness of small-town, pre-Vatican II Catholicism; many laugh out loud moments at the Church's expense.   The cinema scenes reminded me of Cinema Paradiso, and I wonder if that director had viewed this film first.   The ending brought me a few unexpected tears.  

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Several here recommended I watch McCabe & Mrs Miller '71  as Julie Christie's best film. I groaned when I saw Robert Altman was the director, as his films are often disjointed and he doesn't seem to pull the best performances from his principle actors. There are examples where his directing style works OK, so I was hoping this might be a good one.

The movie starts with a Leonard Cohen song, so that helped set a mood. The setting & photography looked great also helping to set a mood. Then we are introduced to McCabe played by Warren Beatty. He was OK, but he's a hard actor to read, is he simple? Snide? Scheming? I can't tell.

Then Miss 1960's Goofy Hairstyle Julie Christie shows up. Admittedly, she's playing an interesting charactor and the plot gets started. But for me at least, the plot just thuds. I don't care about the charactors or their situation. Julie Christie sure is pretty, but her expression is totally blank and her line delivery is flat.  But she was more interesting than Beatty, whom I've liked in other films (Splendor In The Grass, Roman Spring Of Mrs Stone  '61,  Mickey One '65, Heaven Can Wait '78) but was a non-entity in this one. 

I'm going to guess these two are good enough actors, but need a certain director or maybe stronger story-line/dialogue for it to come through. Just like there are actors/actresses that can elevate material with their presence/contribution. Then again, sometimes it's the viewer-your age, social situation, mood, all can influence personal enjoyment of a film.

McCabe_&_Mrs._Miller.png

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Lavender:  She was involved with Gerry Mulligan (who has a brief appearance as her date in Bells are Ringing) after her divorce.  My Mom knew her and has nothing but wonderful things to say about her.  She had a 170+ IQ.  I read her Uncle Joseph's book.  He was either a Communist or a Socialist.  When Judy H. was called before HUAC, she played dumb (and didn't name names).

Last night, watched Kit Kittredge, which is cute (and I'm seen it before).  Good cast (I like Stanley Tucci) but seeing Glenn Headley (sp?) who was a good actress and died far too young made he sad.

Tonight, since I started Master Chef, probably will continue.

I also watch local and national news on weekdays (plus various updates locally and from my governor).  Jeopardy will begin taping soon with Ken Jennings in some sort of role (Producer).  Even repeats test my knowledge (and, since I subscribe to the NY Times, which has the clue of day, already know answer to Final Jeopardy).

 

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Lavender:  JUDY HOLLIDAY was involved with Gerry Mulligan (who has a brief appearance as her date in Bells are Ringing) after her divorce.  My Mom knew her and has nothing but wonderful things to say about her.  She had a 170+ IQ.  I read her Uncle Joseph's book.  He was either a Communist or a Socialist.  When Judy H. was called before HUAC, she played dumb (and didn't name names)

 

They did an album together, it's really good...

 

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17 hours ago, kingrat said:

She's not the only lesbian writer of her era who writes mostly about male protagonists. Mary Renault and Marguerite Yourcenar come to mind, both of whom write very convincingly about male homosexual love in the ancient world, and in the case of Renault's The Charioteer, the present.

no, no, it's not that she writes about men that turns me off, it's that she write like a man- no humor, no empathy, dry, mechanical, remote, aloof, technical, removed, cold, highly transactional...

all of which are traits I could see people liking OR MAYBE EVEN LIKING MYSELF WERE SHE A MAN (although I think I'd still find her stifling), but I just found STRANGERS ON A TRAIN to be suffocating and I REAAAAAAAALLY DID NOT LIKE RIPLEY UNGERGROUND.

(No offense, because I know HIGHSMITH has hardcore fans.)

 

ps- also,this is many years later, but i still recall the edition of STRANGERS ON A TRAIN that I read HAD THE SMALLEST PRINT EVER. It's been 25 years, but i still recall how SMALL THAT PRINT WAS, and I have excellent eyesight (always have.)

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Mystery in Mexico Poster

Mystery In Mexico (1948) TCM 4/10

An insurance investigator searching for a stolen necklace gets involved with a blond singer in Mexico.

A short (65 minutes) mystery/noir directed by Robert Wise. The story is not very interesting and the cast is mostly unknowns. I don't recall seeing the two leads, William Lundigan and Jacqueline White in anything else. White reminds me a bit of Virginia Mayo. The only good things are some on location shooting in Mexico City and some nice "noir" scenes by Wise, this was the followup film to Wise's much better Born To Kill.  You have to wait until the final five minutes before you get any suspense.

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23 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Mystery in Mexico Poster

Mystery In Mexico (1948) TCM 4/10

An insurance investigator searching for a stolen necklace gets involved with a blond singer in Mexico.

A short (65 minutes) mystery/noir directed by Robert Wise. The story is not very interesting and the cast is mostly unknowns. I don't recall seeing the two leads, William Lundigan and Jacqueline White in anything else. White reminds me a bit of Virginia Mayo. The only good things are some on location shooting in Mexico City and some nice "noir" scenes by Wise, this was the followup film to Wise's much better Born To Kill.  You have to wait until the final five minutes before you get any suspense.

At the start of Lundiagan's career he was under contract for Warner Bros.  so one can find him in various Cagney and Flynn  films like The Fighting 69th, Dodge City (which TCM just showed and he played DeHaviland's immature brother),  The Sea Hawk, and Santa Fe Trail.     After WB he went to MGM who had him featured as the lead actor in various "B" pictures,   but he never became the type of star the studio suits desired.

 

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On 9/8/2020 at 6:35 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- watching PURPLE NOON, I could not help but recall my similar  feelings in re: another superb Euro-Thriller- THE NIGHT DIGGER (1971) and its female protagonist.  I mean, yes, okay, so he is a sociopathic murderer, but GURL, those EYES!

dapper-devil-alain-delon-purple-noon-196

ALAIN DELON   VS   GERARD PHILLIPE

lORNA, do the know the amazing Monsieur Phillipe

 

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8 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I don't recall seeing the two leads, William Lundigan and Jacqueline White in anything else.

Lundigan was at Fox in the late 40s and early 50s and is Jeanne Crain's love interest in Pinky, as well as the male lead in Love Nest, which has an early supporting role from Marilyn Monroe.

Jacqueline White is one of the two women in The Narrow Margin.  Oh, and she's in Crossfire, too.

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Ghost of Drag Strip Hollow 1959

I generally check Amazon Prime on Thursday night to see if there's anything worth watching when I get home from work.  This is the start of my weekend and I like to start it off with a funky movie. This one did not disappoint. An American International feature, it centers mostly on drag strip singing teenagers, grooving to rock and roll. It was very typical of the schlock that AIP turned out at the time and most enjoyable if you like this sort of thing.  You can even get the recordings on American International Records if you so desired in the day as mentioned in the credits. I've got to look that up online and see if they're still available. Anyway, I recommend it to those of you who are fans of bad film making. 

 

 

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Pick a Star Poster

Pick A Star (1937) TCM 4/10

A small town girl (Rosina Lawrence) wins a talent show and ends up in Hollywood.

There is a lot of talent in this surprisingly dull musical comedy. I wanted to see this because it is one of the few films with Laurel & Hardy that I had not yet seen. They have two short but amusing scenes barely totally 10 minutes. Lawrence had appeared in L&H's classic Way Out West , she also was in a few Our Gang films as the school teacher. Patsy Kelly and Jack Haley play Rosina's sister and friend who accompany her to Hollywood. They played off each much better in Pigskin Parade (1936).  Another interesting thing was James Finlayson as a movie director but without his walrus mustache for once.

Edited by Det Jim McLeod
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Leave It to Blondie Poster

Leave It To Blondie (1945) Movies! Network 5/10

Dagwood is entered into a song writing contest.

An OK fifteenth entry in the Blondie series. It was the first one made in two years so Alexander is now wearing long pants. Cookie is still cute and has some funny lines. Dagwood is told by a fake gypsy fortune teller that he will meet a black eyed brunette. Unfortunately, Blondie overhears this and gets jealous. It turns out the brunette is a voice coach to help him sing at the contest. Funniest scenes are Dagwood singing in his awful voice and later has to lipsynch to a record. 

 

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Last night, we watched the non-animated version (the end of it) of 101 Dalmatians.  It was good and I'm a sucker for dogs.  I also like Hugh Laurie and he was funny as one of the inept villains.  However, I remember that, in the animated version, the puppies pass through soot in order to hide their spots.  Just checked it out on line and I was correct.  Little did Cruella DeVille know that her two-toned hair would a fashion statement (remember the lead singer from Berlin - take her breath away).

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Just finished BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID  for the umpteenth time on Starz. I love this movie. It's my #2 all time favorite right behind CASABLANCA. Newman and Redford are wonderful in their roles and Katherine Ross is stunning. The banter back and forth between the two outlaws makes them so human and , yes; likable. I've been so intrigued over the years as to what really happened to them. I've seen many historians in documentaries that actually  think they survived and returned to the US. While the movie leaves no doubt as to their demise apparently there is very little evidence as to what actually happened.  Anyway, the film always puts me in a good mood.  I like everything about it including the music by Burt Bacharach. Since it's over 50 years old some of you might not have seen it. Please do yourself a favor and give it a try. I promise you won't be disappointed.

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Branded to Kill (1967)

This is another Japanese New Wave film I hadn't previously seen. It notoriously got director Seijun Suzuki fired from Nikkatsu due to how provocative it is. Having watched it, it's easy to understand why the studio disliked it. It features graphic sex and violence paired with a fair amount of arthouse influence, though it's also evidently not taking itself too seriously. The story revolves around a yakuza hitman with a fetish for smelling steamed rice. Again, this film can be tongue-in-cheek in places, albeit with some hefty dark humor.

I enjoyed it. It's stylish in its visual design and the narrative throws quite a few curveballs at you. Suzuki draws quite a lot of inspiration from film noir, thus the film's portrayals of women are... questionable. Nonetheless, it's a fun, engaging watch. You can certainly see how it inspired folks like Tarantino and Park Chan-wook.

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526x297

oh yay, i found LE BOULEVARD DU PASSION aka FLAMINGO ROAD (1949) on AMAZON PRIME for $4.99 and snapped that sucker up in a heartbeat.

I love this movie SO MUCH, and it's not a great movie...there is just something about THE ENERGY OF IT, the way it moves and flows and wastes little time on questioning the validity of the premise for one minute. I love the look, I love the use of IF I COULD BE WITH YOU, ONE HOUR TONIGHT as a musical leitmotif throughout.  I love that at the age of...let's just say 45...JOAN CRAWFORD brought her ACTING A-GAME to this, in his book ALTERNATE OSCARS, DANNY PEARY thinks she rated a BEST ACTRESS nomination and- hate if you want- but I AGREE. I love that the producers were encouraged to give SYDNEY GREENSTREET a role in the film although he died just prior to filming; he does a fantastically OUTLANDISH, CHESHIRE CAT of a performance as the rigor-mortis literally sets in.

i AM AT the moment really struggling to end a screenplay I am working on that is set in a small town in the past- having difficulties for a variety of reasons- but this was a wise investment on my part because- I DON'T KNOW HOW TO EXPLAIN BUT- I have such a connection with this film- i find its energy and frantic pacing and the boldness of the way it proceeds onscreen to be almost contagious in a way...it's a great film, i think at least, for aspiring writers to watch.

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