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Last night I watched CARMEN JONES '54 on TCM. I'm a Dandridge/Bizet/Preminger fan so figured  this would be good. I was turned off by the vocal dubbing and offended by the racist pronunciations & grammar used. (exactly like Charlie Chan movies) I wasn't for Carmen nor the charactor played by handsome Harry Belefonte, just didn't like them.

Very sorry for my personal reaction, maybe others would like this film. It was visually beautiful, well photographed. I absolutely LOVED Saul Bass' opening credits of a red flame over the outline of a rose-simple, elegant, wonderful!

220px-Carmen_jones.jpeg

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28 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched CARMEN JONES '54 on TCM. I'm a Dandridge/Bizet/Preminger fan so figured  this would be good. I was turned off by the vocal dubbing and offended by the racist pronunciations & grammar used. (exactly like Charlie Chan movies) I wasn't for Carmen nor the charactor played by handsome Harry Belefonte, just didn't like them.

Very sorry for my personal reaction, maybe others would like this film. It was visually beautiful, well photographed. I absolutely LOVED Saul Bass' opening credits of a red flame over the outline of a rose-simple, elegant, wonderful!

I watched this awhile back and had roughly the same reaction you did. I did not like the dubbing.  I found it very off-putting. If they already changed the lyrics of the song to fit the actors, why didn't they just let the cast sing with their real voices? Replacing them with operatic singers wasn't needed, especially for Harry Belafonte. I did like Pearl Bailey's character and singing, because I think she sang with her real voice.  I didn't really understand why the men lusted after Carmen (except for obviously her looks), because she wasn't much of a catch.  Poor Harry Belafonte completely ruined himself for her, and for what? 

Not a criticism of the film, but as an aside, I was familiar with much of the music without having seen Carmen.  I didn't realize how many songs came from the opera. 

I love most musicals, but this one didn't grab me even though I do like Dandridge and Belafonte. 

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18 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I watched this awhile back and had roughly the same reaction you did. I did not like the dubbing.  I found it very off-putting. If they already changed the lyrics of the song to fit the actors, why didn't they just let the cast sing with their real voices? Replacing them with operatic singers wasn't needed, especially for Harry Belafonte

I love most musicals, but this one didn't grab me even though I do like Dandridge and Belafonte. 

I saw the ending of CARMEN JONES by accident, after I had tried and failed to watch the film all the way thru and I finally got what all the fuss was about. It has a VERY STRONG ENDING with some EXCELLENT acting, but the gettin there is a little pokey. I also think DOROTHY DANDRIDGE legit deserved her BEST ACTRESS NOMINATION.

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Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie (1984)


I admit that it was my mistake to watch this movie.

A "next movie" suggestion from a streaming service was nowhere near my taste nor my mood but I did note in the description that it starred Donald Pleasence. He is not one of my favorite actors in mainstream movies but I dearly love how quirky he can be in roles such as: Oddball in: Kelly's Heroes (1970) or: Pinkley in: The Dirty Dozen (1967) or...

I believe that many people will catch my mistake at this point. 

I clicked on the name and looked through the list of movies in which the actor appeared. Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie (1984) was labeled as a spoof of monster movies. I had not heard of it previously but I felt assured the actor would be at his quirky best in such a role. I found the movie on a different streaming service and added it to the "watch next" queue. This displaced another person's selection but I was here and he was not. I am sorry to say that he returned just as the credits were beginning and so I was locked into either watching it or admitting my mistake. 

I clearly made the wrong choice.

It is a hundred years after Dr. Frankenstein's infamous experiment. Donald Pleasence is a descendant who has come to the abandoned ancestral estate to find a purported treasure. Accompanying him is Yvonne Furneaux as his two-hundred year old Aunt Tillie who plans to enter her steam car in a local race. They arrive when local authorities are preparing to seize the property for back taxes so that they may turn it into a buggy-whip factory utilizing local child labor. Sub-plots are that local women are protesting for equal rights and the city has foreclosed on the local home for wayward girls.

The monster is found and reanimated. Donald Pleasence in drag is able to calm the monster's damaged brain. Locals drop a boulder on Aunt Tillie during the race. The local authorities are thwarted. The wayward girls are given the estate for their new home.

No one will now have to watch the movie since all of the spoilers have been revealed. Consider it my good deed for the day.

Petroleum/rock-oil is the only treasure there but whether it has great value or is worthless or what is necessary to sell it or if it should be banned becomes such a confused mess that it is impossible to understand why it is even in the movie.

I believe it would be much easier to describe the movie if the dialogue made any sort of sense. A reviewer on IMDb.com stated: "The script (if indeed there was one) feels like a stream of consciousness from a drunken Chinese madman, translated into English by another drunken madman whose first language is neither Chinese or English." I can assure you that this observation is much kinder than the movie deserves.

What passes for humor: Aunt Tillie introduces the local feminists to bloomers. They promptly don them as outerwear. A suggestion in the city council is to combat the practice with the slogan: "Down with trousers. Up with skirts."

This movie is not actually easy to find. This is clear evidence that even the universe can be ashamed of something and will try to hide it.

The only fair ranking for this movie on a One-to-Five scale is a negative irrational number.
 

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13 hours ago, SansFin said:

Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie (1984) I did note in the description that it starred Donald Pleasence

I clearly made the wrong choice.

The only fair ranking for this movie on a One-to-Five scale is a negative irrational number.
 

DONALD PLEASANCE was actually a really good actor (and a nice man), but damned if he was not an even BIGGER "HOE FO' THE DOUGH" than MICHAEL CAINE. I 100% believe that he would have done a snuff film if you paid him enough and didn't take out taxes.

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Strange Lady in Town (1955). I'm not impressed with the movie, but the actress who played Dana Andrews' daughter looked so familiar to me. Her name is Lois Smith. I looked her up and saw a photograph of her and recognized her right away from her TV work. I had no idea her career has lasted so long (she's older than she looks, 90 years old) and that she's acted alongside some of the greats like Greer Garson and James Dean...No wonder she looked familiar to me. She really hasn't changed, other than aging. She was a pretty woman then and is a pretty woman in her senior years.

Lois Smith then.jpg

Lois Smith now.jpg

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BELIEVE IT OR NOT, IT IS SURPRISINGLY EASY!!!!!!!

 

I can make the same mistake with Patrick Macnee and Patrick McGoohan. It is clear in my mind as I sit here that Macnee was Steed and McGoohan was Number Six and I can relate many of their other roles with no confusion but coming upon the name 'in the wild' creates an instantaneous mental image which can be a transposition of the two and which bears no hallmarks indicating that it might be wrong.  

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DONALD PLEASANCE was actually a really good actor (and a nice man),

 

I like him very much in his supporting roles. He takes on a character so naturally that he is a delight to watch. I am sorry to say that my taste is to have him in small doses and I find him quite underwhelming as a lead.

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19 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DONALD PLEASANCE was actually a really good actor (and a nice man)

I've heard otherwise. Granted, anyone can have a bad day.

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54 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I've heard otherwise [in re: DONALD PLEASANCE being nice]. Granted, anyone can have a bad day.

In re-reading my post, I did make it seem as if I was stating definitive fact when i was largely basing it off of anecdotes I've read from the making of HALLOWEEN and three sequels in which he appeared about how he was easy to work with and even assisted the crew with breaking down equipment on the first picture (it was so low budget.)

It is, in fact, entirely possible he was BEAST in real life.

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I caught bits and pieces of "Angel Face" this morning mixed in with some Tour de France coverage.  I've seen the movie in its entirety a few times, and I really like it; it's one of the more darker roles Jean Simmons played, and she 'played' Robert Mitchum like a fiddle at a Tennessee barn dance.  Simmons is trying to kill her step mother (played by Barbara O'Neill) and make it look like an accident.  Mitchum is an ambulance driver who responds to the family's home in the Hollywood hills to revive the step mother after a 'gas leak' in her bedroom has nearly asphyxiated her.

Simmons is finally able to pull off her scheme as step mom was 'dying' to get to a bridge tournament in Santa Barbara, but was running late.  She jumps in her car, starts the engine, puts it in gear, then goes into overdrive reverse and plummets to her death as the car goes careening down a steep hillside and into a ravine below.  But, to her horror, Simmons' father (played by Herbert Marshall) was in the car too, and he also 'bought it'.  Simmons adored and revered her father who made his claim to fame as a writer, but hadn't produced anything worthy of putting on the back of a cereal box for years, until he met Helen (O'Neill's character).   She was very rich and savvy with her investments, but she was growing weary of Marshall's financial mismanagements and his lack of literary production.  Simmons is implicated in the deaths because someone messed with the gear box of the car involved in the accident.  Mitchum is implicated as well, because after meeting Simmons, he quit his job as the ambulance driver and became the chauffeur for the family.  He becomes infatuated with Simmons and falls in love with her, but he eventually gets wise to her dark side and tries to get away from her and her family.  However, he keeps going back to her as she uses her feminine wiles to further captivate him.  Mitchum's character is also into auto racing, so he knows his way around a garage and a set of mechanics tools.  Leon Ames plays the defense attorney hired to get both Simmons and Mitchum acquitted, and he does so successfully, especially after he encourages Simmons and Mitchum to get married before the trial so she won't have to testify against him.

By now, Mitchum realizes Simmons is bad candy for his romantic sweet tooth, and he makes plans to divorce her and go back to his old girlfriend (played by Mona Freeman).  However, Freeman has finally washed her hands of Mitchum and has taken on with his former ambulance crew partner.  Mitchum goes back to Simmons even though he's not able to stand her anymore, but maybe...just maybe...they can re-ignite a spark by taking a junket to Mexico.  They hop into Simmons' sports car with Mitchum  in the passenger's seat.  She looks at him with scorn and contempt, puts the car in reverse, then floors it!  The car crashes spectacularly down the same ravine where her father and step mother crashed.

The backstory to "Angel Face" is interesting.  Howard Hughes owned RKO studios at this point, and Simmons was looking to get out of her contract and move onto another studio.  Hughes wanted to punish Simmons in some way for her indolence, so he hired tough director, Otto Preminger to direct the picture and put her through the paces in 18 days of filming, so they could beat the deadline to her contract expiration.  Mitchum had to slap Simmons in one scene, but Preminger kept making them do re-takes since he wasn't happy with the way Mitchum was playing the scene.  Finally, Mitchum went up to Preminger and slapped him and said, "Is this how you want me to hit her?"!!  Production of "Angel Face" continued without a hitch after that incident!

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On 9/14/2020 at 11:29 AM, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched CARMEN JONES '54 on TCM. I'm a Dandridge/Bizet/Preminger fan so figured  this would be good. I was turned off by the vocal dubbing and offended by the racist pronunciations & grammar used. (exactly like Charlie Chan movies) I wasn't for Carmen nor the charactor played by handsome Harry Belefonte, just didn't like them.

Very sorry for my personal reaction, maybe others would like this film. It was visually beautiful, well photographed. I absolutely LOVED Saul Bass' opening credits of a red flame over the outline of a rose-simple, elegant, wonderful!

 

I watched Carmen Jones a few years ago and had the same reaction. Parts of it are alright, particularly the decision to change the opera's climactic arena scene to a boxing match. However, much of the film hasn't aged well. That dubbing is certainly distracting. Overall a decent watch for fans of Dandridge and/or Belafonte, but nothing anyone needs to immediately see.

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18 hours ago, SansFin said:

I like him [Donald Pleasance] very much in his supporting roles. He takes on a character so naturally that he is a delight to watch. I am sorry to say that my taste is to have him in small doses and I find him quite underwhelming as a lead.

He is excellent in a later role for BBC Television BARCHESTER CHRONICLES (1982) where he played a meek, low key Parson.

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19 hours ago, Bunderwood said:

Strange Lady in Town (1955). I'm not impressed with the movie, but the actress who played Dana Andrews' daughter looked so familiar to me. Her name is Lois Smith. I looked her up and saw a photograph of her and recognized her right away from her TV work. I had no idea her career has lasted so long (she's older than she looks, 90 years old) and that she's acted alongside some of the greats like Greer Garson and James Dean...No wonder she looked familiar to me. She really hasn't changed, other than aging. She was a pretty woman then and is a pretty woman in her senior years.

Lois Smith then.jpg

Lois Smith now.jpg

She played Aunt Meg in the movie "Twister" (1996)

Left

e4fd7867b658f24e6c0fceea85e7f4c7.jpg

 

 

Here is a photo of a very young Lois Smith.

Lois-Smith-new.png

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2 hours ago, hamradio said:

She played Aunt Meg in the movie "Twister" (1996)

Left

e4fd7867b658f24e6c0fceea85e7f4c7.jpg

 

 

Here is a photo of a very young Lois Smith.

Lois-Smith-new.png

Still very active at nearly 90.  She has two film credits for 2020  (including Tesla).

My favorite role of hers was the brains behind the pre-crime system, now retired, in Minority Report, raising attack flowers in her spare time.

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Lois Smith won a critics' award (National Society of Film Critics, I think) as best supporting actress for Five Easy Pieces. Soap fans may also have seen her as the crazy Zoe Cannell on Somerset (married to Joel Crothers, no less) or on The Doctors as a woman who has an affair with a much younger male hustler (Franc Luz). I've always enjoyed her work and was delighted when she got the big role opposite Tom Cruise in Minority Report.

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I watched PRETTY POISON (1968) on YouTube. 
I have been wanting to see this film for a very long time, as a big fan of the book ALTERNATE OSCARS- Author Danny Peary makes the very odd choice of giving Tuesday Weld the 1968 best actress Oscar for this film, taking it away from both Katherine Hepburn and Barbra Streisand. I like Tuesday Weld, she’s a fantastic actress and absolutely gorgeous, but I’m sorry Danny was smoking something strong when he made that call. She’s fine, even terrific in moments, but in no way shape or form is it a “best actress” part.

The cinematography is absolutely gorgeous though, I was not expecting this to be a color film and it was shot in that crystal clear deep focus like you see in a lot of European movies of the time. (JULIET OF THE SPIRITS came to mind)

ANTHONY PERKINS- Who was just starting to sorta lose his looks when he filmed this – is absolutely terrific.  Poor guy though, he gives such a good performance as an erratic psychopath that you can just see the nail in the typecasting coffin that was hammered halfway when he decided to play Norman Bates.

I don’t think this was a bad movie, but I didn’t like it. The first third is incredibly boring, and while it rallies at the end, it’s just not enough to save it.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched PRETTY POISON (1968) on YouTube. 
I have been wanting to see this film for a very long time, as a big fan of the book ALTERNATE OSCARS- Author Danny Peary makes the very odd choice of giving Tuesday Weld the 1968 best actress Oscar for this film, taking it away from both Katherine Hepburn and Barbra Streisand. I like Tuesday Weld, she’s a fantastic actress and absolutely gorgeous, but I’m sorry Danny was smoking something strong when he made that call. She’s fine, even terrific in moments, but in no way shape or form is it a “best actress” part.

The cinematography is absolutely gorgeous though, I was not expecting this to be a color film and it was shot in that crystal clear deep focus like you see in a lot of European movies of the time. (JULIET OF THE SPIRITS came to mind)

ANTHONY PERKINS- Who was just starting to sorta lose his looks when he filmed this – is absolutely terrific.  Poor guy though, he gives such a good performance as an erratic psychopath that you can just see the nail in the typecasting coffin that was hammered halfway when he decided to play Norman Bates.

I don’t think this was a bad movie, but I didn’t like it. The first third is incredibly boring, and while it rallies at the end, it’s just not enough to save it.

I was (and I guess still am) a Harold and Maude groupie. I loved that film when I first saw it, as a very young man, when it was released in 1971. Then, when it became a cult film a few years later, it returned to the theaters on a double bill. And one such double bill which I remember was Harold and Maude and Pretty Poison. I think Pretty Poison had attained some sort of minor cult status, hence it's re-release. I remember liking it, but I didn't get all the fuss. 

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Hi, I am alive lol. 

BEING JOHN MALKOVICH (1999) 

I recently watched this and rated it 4/5 stars; I had no idea going into it that I would enjoy it so much, yet here we are. I can't exactly describe just what it is that made me like it; I just do. 

20 years ago, Being John Malkovich predicted our social media age | Dazed

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On 9/14/2020 at 12:29 PM, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched CARMEN JONES '54 on TCM. I'm a Dandridge/Bizet/Preminger fan so figured  this would be good. I was turned off by the vocal dubbing and offended by the racist pronunciations & grammar used. (exactly like Charlie Chan movies) I wasn't for Carmen nor the charactor played by handsome Harry Belefonte, just didn't like them.

Very sorry for my personal reaction, maybe others would like this film. It was visually beautiful, well photographed. I absolutely LOVED Saul Bass' opening credits of a red flame over the outline of a rose-simple, elegant, wonderful!

220px-Carmen_jones.jpeg

She was nommed for Best actress for it, but lost to GRACE KELLY in THE COUNTRY GIRL   JUDY all agree really deserved that oscar in A STAR IS BORN though

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17 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Hi, I am alive lol. 

BEING JOHN MALKOVICH (1999) 

I recently watched this and rated it 4/5 stars; I had no idea going into it that I would enjoy it so much, yet here we are. I can't exactly describe just what it is that made me like it; I just do. 

20 years ago, Being John Malkovich predicted our social media age | Dazed

ny friend went to it in WESTWOOD, VILLAGE a very inventive comedy ()***1/2) & I went to the main theatre in WESTWOOD, VILLAGE to see SUSAN SARANDON & NATALIE PORTMAN in ANYWHERE BUT HERE (**1/2)

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Just now, spence said:

ny friend went to it in WESTWOOD, VILLAGE a very inventive comedy ()***1/2) & I went to the main theatre in WESTWOOD, VILLAGE to see SUSAN SARANDON & NATALIE PORTMAN in ANYWHERE BUT HERE (**1/2)

WESWOOD, VILLAGE is where HOLLYWOOD has most of it's premieres thesedays

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