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11 hours ago, Swithin said:

I was (and I guess still am) a Harold and Maude groupie. I loved that film when I first saw it, as a very young man, when it was released in 1971. Then, when it became a cult film a few years later, it returned to the theaters on a double bill. And one such double bill which I remember was Harold and Maude and Pretty Poison. I think Pretty Poison had attained some sort of minor cult status, hence it's re-release. I remember liking it, but I didn't get all the fuss. 

YOU KNOW, PRETTY POISON and HAROLD AND MAUDE actually do have some similarities, but in the oddest way, I feel like a better companion film for it would be VADIM'S PRETTY MAIDS ALL IN A ROW (1971)

I also should have mentioned that even though TUESDAY WELD and ANTHONY PERKINS are great, they are both obviously too old for their roles- WELD is 25 playing 18 and PERKINS is about 38 playing 25.

I also discovered that the screenplay by LORENZO SEMPLE JR (who was the head writer for the BATMAN TV SHOW) won the NY FILM CRITICS CIRCLE award FOR best screenplay- BEATING OUT SOME major major films. I'm not sure how I feel about this...I know it's easy to sit back and criticize, but I feel like the script could've picked up the pacing and really upped the ante with the darkness and violence and even comedy (those moments were actually rather few and far between in the film.)

they also cut a sequence where ANTHONY PERKINS has an affair with his landlady, which renders a later line of important dialogue completely confusing and nonsensical and would have (I think) added something to the film, while they left in a 10 minute sequence of PERKINS hiding out/wandering aimlessly through the woods (some BAD DAY FOR NIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY IS USED) and getting beaten up by a guy who thinks he is a peeping tom that adds ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to the story and GRINDS the pacing of the film- which is already unsteady- to a HALT.

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I watched The Doctor and the Girl, totally unknown to me until this afternoon, and while it was not a prize winner the ending was thought provoking.  Wouldn't he have done more good in the long run by spending more time at the hospital getting better training then returning to his inner city practice a better doctor?  Or was he really in the right place just as he was which is how he, his patients, wife, and finally his father saw him-"an old country doctor in the city?"  It was a reminder to us old enough to remember and younger unknowing viewers just how much medical knowledge and technology has expanded during our lifetime but human compassion and dedication will always have to be part of the equation.      

P. S. How did going to business school turn his wife into a nurse?  Oh, well, I said it wasn't a perfect movie.   

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I watched all 3 'road' movies TCM showed Friday night.

"The Rain People", with Shirley Knight and James Caan as the principle leads wasn't too bad.  I had seen it before, but it had been years.  The story begins with Knight leaving her Long Island home and her husband because she's 'searching' for something that's missing in her life.  She can't put her finger on it, let alone put it into words, but she's out on her own until she picks up a hitchhiker in Pennsylvania (Caan).  Caan has a mental deficiency from injuries sustained as a boxer and football player.  Sometimes he comes off as a child who is fascinated with simple things most adults have moved on from, and other times he's an introspective and astute mature adult.  Robert Duval appears near the end of the film as a cop in Nebraska who has pulled Knight over for speeding, but drops the ticket if Knight agrees to go out on a date with him.  Duval has a wise-beyond-years smart alec daughter as well, who pals around with Caan in the trailer park where she lives with her dad, while Duval and Knight exchange small talk and bodily fluids.   The ending of the film is pretty sad, and overall, I'd say the picture is in a category of a film that you may only need to see once, because it's such a bummer.  I liked how the picture showed flashbacks of Knight's wedding and happy times with her husband, Caan's athletic prowess up to the time of his debilitating injuries, and Duval's futile attempts to save his wife and son from a house fire which killed them.   Overall, I give it a 6 out of 10.  Cinematography is great...story is a downer.

"Harry and Tonto" was a first-time watch for me.  Art Carney and his cat embark on a cross-country trek after Carney (a widower) learns his apartment building is being demolished.  With nowhere to go initially, one of his three kids takes him in with his family in New York City.  After living there a few weeks, and feeling like a burden to his son's family while craving his own privacy, Harry and Tonto strike out to Chicago where his daughter lives.  He has a ticket to fly, but he causes a ruckus at airport security and decides to take a bus.  However, after the bus stops to allow Tonto to take a potty break, the cat runs away through a roadside cemetery.  Carney won't leave without him, so the bus takes off, forcing the old man and his now relocated cat to hitchhike.  He buys a cheapo used car from a dealership he comes upon, and drives toward Chicago.  He stays there with his daughter for a few days before moving on to Los Angeles where his other son lives.  It is here that Tonto dies, and while Harry mourns the loss of his beloved cat, he is able to make new friends and fit into the southern California lifestyle.   Art Carney won an Academy Award for his performance in this film as Best Actor (and it was deserved, as far as I could tell), which I'd give an 8 out of 10.

"Lost in America" was another first-time watch for me.  Albert Brooks and Julie Hagerty are a young married couple in Los Angeles who are on a successful upward track in their careers when everything falls apart for them.  Brooks, thinking he's in line for a plum promotion at his advertising agency, is crushed when he finds out he's being transferred to New York, where he does not want to go.  One thing leads to another, and he insults his boss which causes him to be fired!  He talks his wife into quitting her job, and they buy a Winnebago so they can head out on a journey to discover the beauty and diversity that is America.  Feeling good with about $150,000 on them from the sale of their home, they head first to Las Vegas so they can renew their wedding vows.  Good intentions go to pot when Hagerty goes to a nearby casino in the middle of the night and loses EVERYTHING on the roulette wheel.  This sets off Brooks on a tirade that is on the verge of causing the couple to call it quits on each other.  They finally reconcile and settle temporarily in a small Arizona town where they take menial jobs to try and earn some extra money.  Ultimately, they decide to carry on Eastward to New York.  Brooks is re-hired by his old firm with a substantial cut in pay, while Hagerty gets a job in a department store.  I don't know what to make of this movie.  Hagerty is great in it.  Brooks has his moments, but I just don't find a lot of his shtick to be funny at all (and I felt this way when I saw a few of his pieces aired in the early days of Saturday Night Live).  I suppose I'll go with a 7 out of 10, but it's a 'soft' 7!   

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Life with Blondie Poster

Life With Blondie (1946)  Movies! TV Network 5/10

A woman from the neighborhood sends a photo of Daisy to her son serving in the Navy, Daisy soon becomes a Pin Up Pooch to war time sailors.

An OK Blondie entry,#16 the series. An ad exec also wants to use Daisy in soap ads. He is played by Ernest Truex, who many years later played the lead in the classic Twilight Zone episode "Kick The Can". A funny scene has Dagwood filling in for a male model in a swimsuit ad. Daisy is also wanted by the girlfriend of a gangster. Character actor Marc Lawrence appears as a menacing henchman. When Daisy becomes too famous, Alexander and Cookie tell Dagwood they wish Daisy would go away, Daisy overhears and takes off.

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

"Harry and Tonto" was a first-time watch for me.  Art Carney and his cat embark on a cross-country trek after Carney (a widower) learns his apartment building is being demolished.  With nowhere to go initially, one of his three kids takes him in with his family in New York City.  After living there a few weeks, and feeling like a burden to his son's family while craving his own privacy, Harry and Tonto strike out to Chicago where his daughter lives.  He has a ticket to fly, but he causes a ruckus at airport security and decides to take a bus.  However, after the bus stops to allow Tonto to take a potty break, the cat runs away through a roadside cemetery.  Carney won't leave without him, so the bus takes off, forcing the old man and his now relocated cat to hitchhike.  He buys a cheapo used car from a dealership he comes upon, and drives toward Chicago.  He stays there with his daughter for a few days before moving on to Los Angeles where his other son lives.  It is here that Tonto dies, and while Harry mourns the loss of his beloved cat, he is able to make new friends and fit into the southern California lifestyle.   Art Carney won an Academy Award for his performance in this film as Best Actor (and it was deserved, as far as I could tell), which I'd give an 8 out of 10.

I liked this one too. I saw it when first released and thought it was great, even though I was only 13 at the time. I was touched by the serious moments and thought the comedic scenes were hilarious. Carney as excellent, he won despite stiff competition that year: Albert Finney (Murder On The Orient Express), Dustin Hoffman (Lenny), Jack Nicholson (Chinatown) and Al Pacino (The Godfather Part II)

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22 hours ago, midwestan said:

"Lost in America"  I don't know what to make of this movie.  Hagerty is great in it.  Brooks has his moments

Heh, I'm watching this on DVD and just can't get through it. I love Julie Hagerty, don't think she's in enough movies. Guess I found out she's BEEN in movies, just not very good ones.   I love Hagerty in 82's A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS SEX COMEDY.  Looking over her filmography, the only title I recognize is AIRPLANE! Guess I'll try that one next.

She's 64 in this picture taken last year-WOW! (she must have a painting locked in the attic)

220px-Julie_Hagerty_Sidewalks_Entertainm

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The_Evil_of_43.jpg

it's funny how when the news SUCKS, i take to HORROR MOVIES.

I rented EVIL OF FRANKENSTEIN (1964), which more than one person has asserted is the worst of THE HAMMER FRANKENSTEIN PRODUCTIONS.  it's actually my favorite by a mile (although I do not recall A THING from THE REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN) and is nowhere near as BAD as FRANKENSTEIN CREATED WOMAN, which- for the record- I distinctly recall yelling "THAT'S IT????!" when the credits start to roll at the end.

this was directed by FREDDIE FRANCIS (maybe his first film?) and like NEARLY EVERY OTHER FILM HE EVER DID- it is INCREDIBLY lovely to look at AND VISUALLY INVOLVING AS HELL andalso  has MAJOR PLOT/PACING/DIALOGUE/LOGIC/ACTING ISSUES that ANYONE WHO KNEW WHAT THE HOLY HELL THEY WERE DOING AS A DIRECTOR WOULD'VE NIPPED BUT FAST.  (ie A DEAF GIRL OVERHEARS SOMETHING ON MORE THAN ONE OCCASION IN ORDER TO FURTHER THE PLOT IN THIS MOVIE. )

IT'S STILL hard for me to understand how anyone who could light a film like he could would have such issues when it came to being a director.

it's not bad though- just disjointed (seems like several films stitched together

The Monster's MAKE-UP in this movie is both THE WORST MAKEUP I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE and THE BEST. Till you really see it in action and from multiple angles, I don't know if you can understand what I mean by that. I WANT A GIANT PAINTING OF IT TO HANG IN MY FOYER.

the sets are some of the best HAMMER ever did- WITH THE NOTABLE EXCEPTION OF SOME CLEAR PLASTIC THAT THEY CLAIM IS AN ICE GLACIER. I am pretty sure I recognize the steps from DRACULA'S CASTLE VAULT in HORROR OF DRACULA in the laboratory.

Like the HAMMER VERSION OF THE MUMMY, this was done with the cooperation of UNIVERSAL, who distributed it and I think still own it; this film in many ways plays as a bit of a homage to the UNIVERSAL HORRORS and I think that that is why I like it so.

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DAMN! SHE MUST'VE GONE TO VISIT ISABELLA ROSSELINI!

(DEATH BECOMES HER reference)

I love both those ladies  (Isabella Rossellini and Julie Hagerty.

Hey, Lorna, you have no comments for the Noir thread about "Gilda" ??

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 I love Julie Hagerty, don't think she's in enough movies.

 

50 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I love both those ladies  (Isabella Rossellini and Julie Hagerty.

I also love Julie Hagerty.

She was great as  Scarlett Johansson's mother in MARRIAGE STORY.  One of my favorite moments from that movie is when  Scarlett Johansson, Julie Hagerty and Merritt Wever (who plays Johansson's sister) perform Stephen Sondheim's "You Could Drive A Person Crazy" from  COMPANY.

misswonderly, have you seen MARRIAGE S TORY yet?  Our mutual favorite Adam Driver plays Johannson's estranged husband in the movie. Another favorite moment of mine from this movie is  Adam Driver's performance of "Being Alive," another Sondheim song from COMPANY. 

la-et-mn-a-marriage-story-netflix-03a.jp

526x297

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On 9/19/2020 at 9:30 AM, midwestan said:

I watched all 3 'road' movies TCM showed Friday night.

"The Rain People", with Shirley Knight and James Caan as the principle leads wasn't too bad.  I had seen it before, but it had been years.  The story begins with Knight leaving her Long Island home and her husband because she's 'searching' for something that's missing in her life.  She can't put her finger on it, let alone put it into words, but she's out on her own until she picks up a hitchhiker in Pennsylvania (Caan).  Caan has a mental deficiency from injuries sustained as a boxer and football player.  Sometimes he comes off as a child who is fascinated with simple things most adults have moved on from, and other times he's an introspective and astute mature adult.  Robert Duval appears near the end of the film as a cop in Nebraska who has pulled Knight over for speeding, but drops the ticket if Knight agrees to go out on a date with him.  Duval has a wise-beyond-years smart alec daughter as well, who pals around with Caan in the trailer park where she lives with her dad, while Duval and Knight exchange small talk and bodily fluids.   The ending of the film is pretty sad, and overall, I'd say the picture is in a category of a film that you may only need to see once, because it's such a bummer.  I liked how the picture showed flashbacks of Knight's wedding and happy times with her husband, Caan's athletic prowess up to the time of his debilitating injuries, and Duval's futile attempts to save his wife and son from a house fire which killed them.   Overall, I give it a 6 out of 10.  Cinematography is great...story is a downer.

I love THE RAIN PEOPLE.  It's a wonderful pre-GODFATHER movie by Francis Ford Coppola.  James Caan and  Robert Duvall were roommates when this movie was made. (They would both work on Coppola's THE GODFATHER. )

I love when James Caan's character ("Killer") lets the animal's free.

shirley-knight-james-caan-the-rain-peopl

And, yes, beautiful cinematography by Bill Butler ( JAWS)

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On 9/19/2020 at 10:30 AM, midwestan said:

.

"Lost in America" was another first-time watch for me.  Albert Brooks and Julie Hagerty are a young married couple in Los Angeles who are on a successful upward track in their careers when everything falls apart for them.  Brooks, thinking he's in line for a plum promotion at his advertising agency, is crushed when he finds out he's being transferred to New York, where he does not want to go.  One thing leads to another, and he insults his boss which causes him to be fired!  He talks his wife into quitting her job, and they buy a Winnebago so they can head out on a journey to discover the beauty and diversity that is America.  Feeling good with about $150,000 on them from the sale of their home, they head first to Las Vegas so they can renew their wedding vows.  Good intentions go to pot when Hagerty goes to a nearby casino in the middle of the night and loses EVERYTHING on the roulette wheel.  This sets off Brooks on a tirade that is on the verge of causing the couple to call it quits on each other.  They finally reconcile and settle temporarily in a small Arizona town where they take menial jobs to try and earn some extra money.  Ultimately, they decide to carry on Eastward to New York.  Brooks is re-hired by his old firm with a substantial cut in pay, while Hagerty gets a job in a department store.  I don't know what to make of this movie.  Hagerty is great in it.  Brooks has his moments, but I just don't find a lot of his shtick to be funny at all (and I felt this way when I saw a few of his pieces aired in the early days of Saturday Night Live).  I suppose I'll go with a 7 out of 10, but it's a 'soft' 7!   

Brooks is an acquired taste, but I found Lost in America to be very witty and well handled (not to mention kudos for casting the wonderful Julie Hagerty). i have a feeling that two of the films he did in the 90s might be popular here: The Muse, with a delightfully quirky performance from Sharon Stone and many Hollywood in-jokes, and especially Mother, with its wonderful central performance from Debbie Reynolds.

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Brooks is an acquired taste, but I found Lost in America to be very witty and well handled (not to mention kudos for casting the wonderful Julie Hagerty). i have a feeling that two of the films he did in the 90s might be popular here: The Muse, with a delightfully quirky performance from Sharon Stone and many Hollywood in-jokes, and especially Mother, with its wonderful central performance from Debbie Reynolds.

Albert Brooks's entire ACT  is neurotic New Yorker self-deprecation, like Woody Allen in his prime without the creepy stuff.  That's how Brooks can play a stressed-out orange fish who can't tell jokes, a broadcast news writer who will never get the girl, and a dweeby 70's campaign worker who doesn't know why his girl is falling for a gun-toting loner.

Apart from Lost, I wouldn't use the above examples as first-time watches to explain Brooks (The Muse brings up the question of "Why are the fictitious movies-within-a-movie in Hollywood satires so danged bizarre?"), but I would assume years from now, Albert Brooks' entire career will be remembered for his most mainstream Defending Your Life

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Hey, Lorna, you have no comments for the Noir thread about "Gilda" ??

(looks left)

(looks right) 

Can you keep a secret? 

GILDA kind of bores me. Always has ever since I saw it on VHS ca. 1993. 

TELL NO ONE OF THIS!!!!

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10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(looks left)

(looks right) 

Can you keep a secret? 

GILDA kind of bores me. Always has ever since I saw it on VHS ca. 1993. 

TELL NO ONE OF THIS!!!!

I love it !  I don't like Gilda either ! And yes,  I too get bored with it.   Check out my write-up about it on the Noir Alley thread and you'll see what I mean.

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19 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(looks left)

(looks right) 

Can you keep a secret? 

GILDA kind of bores me. Always has ever since I saw it on VHS ca. 1993. 

TELL NO ONE OF THIS!!!!

That's because they stopped her "Put The Blame on Mame" striptease number just as it was about to get interesting.

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's funny how when the news SUCKS, i take to HORROR MOVIES.

It's not unlike the 50's plethora of sci-fi films about alien invasions or Japan's atomic age Godzilla movies. When we were ordered to shut down in March, I grabbed all the Steven King I could read, most especially The Stand. 

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In case any of you are watching the news about all the historic EMMY wins for the show SCHITT'S CREEK and wondering if they were deserved, as someone who HATES modern TV, I watched the final season when the PANDEMIC first hit and can verify that it is a charming, charming show.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

In case any of you are watching the news about all the historic EMMY wins for the show SCHITT'S CREEK and wondering if they were deserved, as someone who HATES modern TV, I watched the final season when the PANDEMIC first hit and can verify that it is a charming, charming show.

And it's a Canadian show. 🙂  ( was looking for a "proud" emoji, but not sure there is one.)

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

And it's a Canadian show. 🙂  ( was looking for a "proud" emoji, but not sure there is one.)

Well, I may have to check "Schitt's Creek" out.  I have watched a few episodes of "Letterkenny", another Canadian-produced series.  It has its moments, but I got sidetracked from binge watching it thanks to TCM's Summer Under The Stars, which usually garners much of my viewing habits in August.

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I found a copy of MURDERS IN THE ZOO (1933) online. 

They made some absolutely off-the-wall films before 1934, and it’s almost like they realized the clock was running out when this film was being shot so they put as much crazy stuff in this one as they could. It borders on being a MONDO Movie, (Only thing is I think it was a Paramount film!!!)

This may be LIONEL ATWILLS most extreme role, the sets are excellent And there are numerous scenes with real live animals and I presume stunt doubles, and not rear projection photography. ATWILL himself Is seen in a particularly horrifying shot with a python around him.

GAIL PATRICK- Before she became an ice queen is in this, so is Randolph Scott but he is not good at all. He is still better than “Comic Relief” Charlie Ruggles who says  his every line as if someone is standing just off camera holding his family at gunpoint. He frankly has no business being in this movie, but seeing as how it’s barely an hour I guess they had to stretch somewhere (and ABBOTT had not yet met COSTELLO nor had THE RITZ BROTHERS been formed...)

this movie is pretty wild, Despite some shortcomings, I still highly recommend it. It even starts off with an incredible shot in the first three minutes that you will not believe.
(Apologies for grammar issues I am posting using my phone.)

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I know this wasn't the message that the director wanted to show in The Rain People, but to me

this flick just proves you can't drive ten miles in the U.S. without running into idiots, con men, 

and dumb cops.

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Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me Poster

Twin Peaks Fire Walk With Me (1992) TCM On Demand 5/10

A prequel to the TV series showing the  sordid life of murder victim Laura Palmer.

A first time viewing for me. I was a fan of the original TV show, but avoided this film because it flopped so badly and got some scathing reviews. It is not a horrible movie but not too good either. I admire director David Lynch, though some of his films I love (Blue Velvet) or hate (Wild At Heart). I liked Sheryl Lee's (Laura) performance and Ray Wise as her father Leland. My favorite character FBI Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) shows up but doesn't have much too do. I liked some of the dream sequences with dwarf actor Michael Anderson. It goes on a bit too long (135 min) and if you saw the TV show, you will know already who the killer is.

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9 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me Poster

Twin Peaks Fire Walk With Me (1992) TCM On Demand 5/10

A prequel to the TV series showing the  sordid life of murder victim Laura Palmer.

A first time viewing for me. I was a fan of the original TV show, but avoided this film because it flopped so badly and got some scathing reviews. It is not a horrible movie but not too good either. I admire director David Lynch, though some of his films I love (Blue Velvet) or hate (Wild At Heart). I liked Sheryl Lee's (Laura) performance and Ray Wise as her father Leland. My favorite character FBI Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) shows up but doesn't have much too do. I liked some of the dream sequences with dwarf actor Michael Anderson. It goes on a bit too long (135 min) and if you saw the TV show, you will know already who the killer is.

I was really PO'd when I woke up Saturday morning and missed WILD AT HEART by two minutes (couldn't rewind using HULU) and then IT NEVER SHOWED UP on TCM ON DEMAND even though the TWIN PEAKS movie did.

I really wanted to see it! it would have been the first time in years and years.

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