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On 9/21/2020 at 11:22 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

In case any of you are watching the news about all the historic EMMY wins for the show SCHITT'S CREEK and wondering if they were deserved, as someone who HATES modern TV, I watched the final season when the PANDEMIC first hit and can verify that it is a charming, charming show.

We just started SCHITT"S CREEK. It's ridiculous but very funny. I hadn't seen Chris Elliott or Eugene Levy in anything for years. They are perfect. However Catherine O'Hara steals the show. 

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42 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

We just started SCHITT"S CREEK. It's ridiculous but very funny. I hadn't seen Chris Elliott or Eugene Levy in anything for years. They are perfect. However Catherine O'Hara steals the show. 

ANNIE MURPHY, who plays the daughter ALEXIS has the stuff to be a breakout star.

(the video below may give you some idea of how deep the SCHITT'S fandom runs)

 

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

We just started SCHITT"S CREEK. It's ridiculous but very funny. I hadn't seen Chris Elliott or Eugene Levy in anything for years. They are perfect. However Catherine O'Hara steals the show. 

I started watching the show a couple years ago after catching it's name when checking out what was on in my cable service's "guide".  I laughed at the clever spelling of the name of the place that for years in my youth my Mother warded I'd be up without a paddle if I didn't stop whatever stupid thing I was doing at the time.  So, when tuning in and seeing Levy and O'Hara heading up the cast and being a "Second City TV" fan since the show was out of Canada, and shown on the local PBS station here in the Detroit area in the mid '70's and after it finally hit the states as "SCTV" on NBC by the '80's.   DANIEL LEVY seems to be almost his Father's equal.  

I was happy to learn of their recognition.  And the show's.

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me Poster

Twin Peaks Fire Walk With Me (1992) TCM On Demand 5/10

A prequel to the TV series showing the  sordid life of murder victim Laura Palmer.

A first time viewing for me. I was a fan of the original TV show, but avoided this film because it flopped so badly and got some scathing reviews. It is not a horrible movie but not too good either. I admire director David Lynch, though some of his films I love (Blue Velvet) or hate (Wild At Heart). I liked Sheryl Lee's (Laura) performance and Ray Wise as her father Leland. My favorite character FBI Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) shows up but doesn't have much too do. I liked some of the dream sequences with dwarf actor Michael Anderson. It goes on a bit too long (135 min) and if you saw the TV show, you will know already who the killer is.

I like it way better probably a 7-8/10  reviewed here:  Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

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On 9/21/2020 at 11:22 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

In case any of you are watching the news about all the historic EMMY wins for the show SCHITT'S CREEK and wondering if they were deserved, as someone who HATES modern TV, I watched the final season when the PANDEMIC first hit and can verify that it is a charming, charming show.

I waiting for the sequel Up Without a Paddle

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5 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I waiting for the sequel Up Without a Paddle

You joke, but I would not be entirely surprised. The show ended it’s run right before the pandemic with the characters all getting their lives together- new jobs, new homes, new futures etc. All that would be quashed by what has gone down in 2020.
So I would not be surprised at all to see “return to Schitt’s Creek“ or something like that.

(The root premise of the series being it’s about a super rich family who lose all their money and have to move into a seedy small town motel together.)

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I watched THE REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1958)- I could not help but be somewhat underwhelmed, and not just because the titular “revenge” never in fact takes place. It’s the direct sequel to THE CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN In which a surprisingly sexy and almost heavy (compared to how thin he usually was) PETER CUSHING reprises his  role as HERR BARON VON FRANKENSTEIN. 
I tend to prefer the HAMMER Draculas to the HAMMER Frankensteins, but it is to note (and I sometimes wonder if this was because Cushing was a more flexible actor then Christopher Lee) the FRANKENHAMMERS are a much more unique and creative (even at times humorous) series of films whereas the Dracula films feel like variations around the one same idea.
Still, I have to say this film really didn’t do it for me. There’s a very odd moment about 40 minutes into it where the film just grinds to a halt, practically takes elevensies in front of us and proceeds to make up its mind about what it wants to have happen next.

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Party Wire (1935)

I watched this Jean Arthur drama the other day and found it quite relevant to today's events.  Granted, we aren't dealing with party lines (aka "party wire") anymore, but sub "party line" with "social media" and this film is fairly accurate.  In Party Wire, Victor Jory (who I barely recognized in this movie. I think I've only seen him in Dodge City) plays Nathan Putnam, the wealthy nephew of Nettie Putnam, a prominent figure in the small town of Rockridge.  I don't recall the location of Rockridge, but it was definitely rural. The Putnams  own and run the local Rockridge Dairy, the main industry (and employer) in this small town.  Nettie is an invalid and wants to turn the reins of running the dairy over to Nathan.  Nathan has been cavorting in Europe for the past seven years and is the talk of the town.  

We are first treated to the town gossips right at the beginning of the film.  The man who runs the telegram office  receives a wire about Nathan Putnam's impending arrival.  Soon he's on the party line spreading the word  (It seems that half the town, or at least all the characters in this film are on the same party line).  By the time Nathan arrives, everyone is at the train station to greet him. All the women in town want eligible bachelor Nathan to marry their marriage-ready daughters--presumably to attach themselves to his and his family's wealth and status.  However, Nathan only has eyes  for Marge Oliver (Jean Arthur), a local bank employee (it seems that she's not so much a teller as she prepares monthly bank statements?) at Sherman Bank. Marge's father, Will Oliver (Charley Grapewin) is a friend of Nathan's.  The town gossips don't think much of Will.  He's really only thought of as the town drunk because he makes his own Apple Jack.  In the town gossips' defense, he is drunk a lot in this film; but in his defense, he probably needs to drink to deal with the people in his town. 

The main conflict occurs when Roy Daniels, a man who is interested in Marge, comes over to the Oliver's home to go over the local church's books with Marge.  While they're working on balancing the church's bank ledger, Roy makes a bid for Marge's affections. Marge turns him down and he throws a fit and says he's moving to New York City  (to which *I'd* say "Good. Leave") and leaves.  Marge then discovers an imbalance of $60-something in the account that doesn't appear to have a receipt.  After hearing that Roy just bailed and thinking  that he's responsible for the missing funds (Author's  Note: If you were going to embezzle from the church funds, wouldn't you steal more than $60?), Will makes a call to Roy on that blasted party line.  Everyone  in town overhears this conversation, and hears Will say something to the effect of Roy getting Marge into a fix and he needs to come back and make things right.  Well obviously, by "fix" everyone assumes that Marge is pregnant and that Roy needs to come back for the shotgun wedding.

Word spreads like wildfire about Marge's supposed illicit activities and botched character. It seems that the ringleader of the gossip brigade is Mathilda Sherman (Clara Blandick) a mean-spirited woman who's upset that Nathan is more interested in Marge than her daughter Irene. Sherman is also the wife of Marge's employer at Sherman bank.  She's also the head committee member of the annual Flower Show which Marge enters.  Mathilda & Co.'s gossip essentially ruins Marge's life in this small town.  Will feels especially guilty as he was the one who made the initial call on the party line.

I really liked this film.  I liked seeing Jean Arthur, one of my favorites, in a dramatic part.  This film especially demonstrated the damage that gossip, especially ill-informed gossip, can do to someone's life.  While party lines are passé now, the idea of gossip spreading quickly and the effect it can have on someone's life is still relevant today.  Just think how many people's  lives, or television shows, movies, etc. have been ruined or greatly damaged by rumors spreading on social media? Sub social media for the party line in this  film and this situation still exists.  All it takes is one  person with a mean-spirited agenda, or to hold a grudge against someone, and one social media post and that person's life can be upended.  

***SOMEWHAT A SPOILER***

The ending scene in this film is amazing. Nettie Putnam does what everyone wishes they could do in her situation and in-person--unlike today's cowards on social media who put everyone on blast behind an anonymous  screenname, Nettie lets her feelings known to their faces. 

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57 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Party Wire (1935)

I watched this Jean Arthur drama the other day and found it quite relevant to today's events.  Granted, we aren't dealing with party lines (aka "party wire") anymore, but sub "party line" with "social media" and this film is fairly accurate.  In Party Wire, Victor Jory (who I barely recognized in this movie. I think I've only seen him in Dodge City) plays Nathan Putnam, the wealthy nephew of Nettie Putnam, a prominent figure in the small town of Rockridge.  I don't recall the location of Rockridge, but it was definitely rural. The Putnams  own and run the local Rockridge Dairy, the main industry (and employer) in this small town.  Nettie is an invalid and wants to turn the reins of running the dairy over to Nathan.  Nathan has been cavorting in Europe for the past seven years and is the talk of the town.  

We are first treated to the town gossips right at the beginning of the film.  The man who runs the telegram office  receives a wire about Nathan Putnam's impending arrival.  Soon he's on the party line spreading the word  (It seems that half the town, or at least all the characters in this film are on the same party line).  By the time Nathan arrives, everyone is at the train station to greet him. All the women in town want eligible bachelor Nathan to marry their marriage-ready daughters--presumably to attach themselves to his and his family's wealth and status.  However, Nathan only has eyes  for Marge Oliver (Jean Arthur), a local bank employee (it seems that she's not so much a teller as she prepares monthly bank statements?) at Sherman Bank. Marge's father, Will Oliver (Charley Grapewin) is a friend of Nathan's.  The town gossips don't think much of Will.  He's really only thought of as the town drunk because he makes his own Apple Jack.  In the town gossips' defense, he is drunk a lot in this film; but in his defense, he probably needs to drink to deal with the people in his town. 

The main conflict occurs when Roy Daniels, a man who is interested in Marge, comes over to the Oliver's home to go over the local Church's books with Marge.  While they're working on balancing the church's bank ledger, Roy makes a bid for Marge's affections. Marge turns him down and he throws a fit and says he's moving to New York City  (to which *I'd* say "Good. Leave") and leaves.  Marge then discovers an imbalance of $60-something in the account that doesn't appear to have a receipt.  After hearing that Roy just bailed and thinking  that he's responsible for the missing funds, Will makes a call to Roy on that blasted party line.  Everyone  in town overhears this conversation, and hears Will say something to the effect of Roy getting Marge into a fix and he needs to come back and make things right.  Well obviously, by "fix" everyone assumes that Marge is pregnant and that Roy needs to come back for the shotgun wedding.

Word spreads like wildfire about Marge's supposed illicit activities and botched character. It seems that the ringleader of the gossip brigade is Mathilda Sherman (Clara Blandick) a mean-spirited woman who's upset that Nathan is more interested in Marge than her daughter Irene. Sherman is also the wife of Marge's employer at Sherman bank.  She's also the head committee member of the annual Flower Show which Marge enters.  Mathilda & Co.'s gossip essentially ruins Marge's life in this small town.  Will feels especially guilty as he was the one who made the initial call on the party line.

I really liked this film.  I liked seeing Jean Arthur, one of my favorites, in a dramatic part.  This film especially demonstrated the damage that gossip, especially ill-informed gossip, can do to someone's life.  While party lines are passé now, the idea of gossip spreading quickly and the effect it can have on someone's life is still relevant today.  Just think how many people's  lives, or television shows, movies, etc. have been ruined or greatly damaged by rumors spreading on social media? Sub social media for the party line in this  film and this situation still exists.  All it takes is one  person with a mean-spirited agenda, or to hold a grudge against someone, and one social media post and that person's life can be upended.  

***SOMEWHAT A SPOILER***

The ending scene in this film is amazing. Nettie Putnam does what everyone wishes they could do in her situation and in-person--unlike today's cowards on social media who put everyone on blast behind an anonymous  screenname, Nettie lets her feelings known to their faces. 

VICTOR JORY Played “that white trash Jonas Wilkerson “in GONE WITH THE WIND (The overseer who is fired for impregnating a woman, but who comes back after the war and tries to buy Tara but Scarlett throws the lump of clay in his face.)
he was also in CATWOMEN OF THE MOON

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

VICTOR JORY Played “that white trash Jonas Wilkerson “in GONE WITH THE WIND (The overseer who is fired for impregnating a woman, but who comes back after the war and tries to buy Tara but Scarlett throws the lump of clay in his face.)
he was also in CATWOMEN OF THE MOON

Lol.  Obviously Catwomen of the Moon being the more prestigious film credit between the two.

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Oh yeah, I figured  that just went without saying.

Not  sure if I bought Victor Jory as the romantic leading man, but he definitely was a "catch" compared to the other men in that town--including Frank McHugh's brother who looked exactly like him.

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19 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Not  sure if I bought Victor Jory as the romantic leading man, but he definitely was a "catch" compared to the other men in that town--including Frank McHugh's brother who looked exactly like him.

One of the many funny things about CATWOMEN OF THE MOON (Which costarred Marie Windsor and Sonny Tufts) is that JORY Is playing an astronaut. Now, when he made the film in 1953 he was, I think already in his late 40s or 50s (and rail thin at that!) There is one scene where he’s lying on his back and you can very clearly see the outline of a pillow stuffed up his shirt.

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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

One of the many funny things about CATWOMEN OF THE MOON (Which costarred Marie Windsor and Sonny Tufts) is that JORY Is playing an astronaut. Now, when he made the film in 1953 he was, I think already in his late 40s or 50s (and rail thin at that!) There is one scene where he’s lying on his back and you can very clearly see the outline of a pillow stuffed up his shirt.

That is amazing. Catwomen of the Moon has just shot to the top of my "Must See" list.

At least Frank Sinatra's padded seat in On the Town was better concealed.

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On 9/23/2020 at 9:07 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was really PO'd when I woke up Saturday morning and missed WILD AT HEART by two minutes (couldn't rewind using HULU) and then IT NEVER SHOWED UP on TCM ON DEMAND even though the TWIN PEAKS movie did.

I really wanted to see it! it would have been the first time in years and years.

You didnt watch it because you missed the first two minutes??

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Possible SPOILERS for OCB but if you're really persnickety about such things, you might want to avoid it.

I watched On Chesil Beach (2017) and didn't like it. It held me throughout so I guess it wasn't all that bad, 'cause it wasn't. A personal thing for me. As I get older endings such as that get to me a bit.  The ending is similar to 45 Years (2014)---I am permanently devastated by this movie. There is even a similarity with La Strada.  Ronan Saoirse has turned into a phenom for me. She's an actor who I tend to watch rather closely. She has screen appeal such as the great ones have and they grow on you (or me) I can' t keep my eyes off her (and not for THAT reason, haha, which is not to deny of course that she is very pretty).  The peculiarity of her present character turns her from that nice wholesome look that she can radiate so effortlessly into what might be considered a modern enigma.

Hope Gap (2020) is worth every minute that Annette Benning occupies the screen. Bill Nighy plays alongside her and has such a monolithic demeanor throughout that I feel he was sorted of wasted on the role. They are man and wife and he has come to a decision. A family drama which shows promise in the beginning but flags at some point and never quite recovers. A shallowness emerges somewhere along the way. I would still recommend it though, it's not possible that one should consider not seeing the performance of Miss Benning.

//

 

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Party Wire (1935)

I watched this Jean Arthur drama the other day and found it quite relevant to today's events.  Granted, we aren't dealing with party lines (aka "party wire") anymore, but sub "party line" with "social media" and this film is fairly accurate.  In Party Wire, Victor Jory (who I barely recognized in this movie. I think I've only seen him in Dodge City) plays Nathan Putnam, the wealthy nephew of Nettie Putnam, a prominent figure in the small town of Rockridge.  I don't recall the location of Rockridge, but it was definitely rural. The Putnams  own and run the local Rockridge Dairy, the main industry (and employer) in this small town.  Nettie is an invalid and wants to turn the reins of running the dairy over to Nathan.  Nathan has been cavorting in Europe for the past seven years and is the talk of the town.  

We are first treated to the town gossips right at the beginning of the film.  The man who runs the telegram office  receives a wire about Nathan Putnam's impending arrival.  Soon he's on the party line spreading the word  (It seems that half the town, or at least all the characters in this film are on the same party line).  By the time Nathan arrives, everyone is at the train station to greet him. All the women in town want eligible bachelor Nathan to marry their marriage-ready daughters--presumably to attach themselves to his and his family's wealth and status.  However, Nathan only has eyes  for Marge Oliver (Jean Arthur), a local bank employee (it seems that she's not so much a teller as she prepares monthly bank statements?) at Sherman Bank. Marge's father, Will Oliver (Charley Grapewin) is a friend of Nathan's.  The town gossips don't think much of Will.  He's really only thought of as the town drunk because he makes his own Apple Jack.  In the town gossips' defense, he is drunk a lot in this film; but in his defense, he probably needs to drink to deal with the people in his town. 

The main conflict occurs when Roy Daniels, a man who is interested in Marge, comes over to the Oliver's home to go over the local church's books with Marge.  While they're working on balancing the church's bank ledger, Roy makes a bid for Marge's affections. Marge turns him down and he throws a fit and says he's moving to New York City  (to which *I'd* say "Good. Leave") and leaves.  Marge then discovers an imbalance of $60-something in the account that doesn't appear to have a receipt.  After hearing that Roy just bailed and thinking  that he's responsible for the missing funds (Author's  Note: If you were going to embezzle from the church funds, wouldn't you steal more than $60?), Will makes a call to Roy on that blasted party line.  Everyone  in town overhears this conversation, and hears Will say something to the effect of Roy getting Marge into a fix and he needs to come back and make things right.  Well obviously, by "fix" everyone assumes that Marge is pregnant and that Roy needs to come back for the shotgun wedding.

Word spreads like wildfire about Marge's supposed illicit activities and botched character. It seems that the ringleader of the gossip brigade is Mathilda Sherman (Clara Blandick) a mean-spirited woman who's upset that Nathan is more interested in Marge than her daughter Irene. Sherman is also the wife of Marge's employer at Sherman bank.  She's also the head committee member of the annual Flower Show which Marge enters.  Mathilda & Co.'s gossip essentially ruins Marge's life in this small town.  Will feels especially guilty as he was the one who made the initial call on the party line.

I really liked this film.  I liked seeing Jean Arthur, one of my favorites, in a dramatic part.  This film especially demonstrated the damage that gossip, especially ill-informed gossip, can do to someone's life.  While party lines are passé now, the idea of gossip spreading quickly and the effect it can have on someone's life is still relevant today.  Just think how many people's  lives, or television shows, movies, etc. have been ruined or greatly damaged by rumors spreading on social media? Sub social media for the party line in this  film and this situation still exists.  All it takes is one  person with a mean-spirited agenda, or to hold a grudge against someone, and one social media post and that person's life can be upended.  

***SOMEWHAT A SPOILER***

The ending scene in this film is amazing. Nettie Putnam does what everyone wishes they could do in her situation and in-person--unlike today's cowards on social media who put everyone on blast behind an anonymous  screenname, Nettie lets her feelings known to their faces. 

:)You give us a SPOILER after having related practically the whole story.  I'm not being cranky, a nice post throughout. The idea of what is a spoiler is something I need to contemplate, I guess.;)

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46 minutes ago, Hibi said:

You didnt watch it because you missed the first two minutes??

 No the last two minutes, it’s hard to explain. I have Hulu and if I catch a movie *while* it is airing I can rewind it and start watching it from the beginning, if I miss the film while it is airing and the film is *not then offered on TCM on demand on Hulu* then I’ve missed my chance to see it. 
So I missed being able to rewind the film by about two minutes, and then the film was not offered on demand.
 

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Oh, I see. I thought you were being a purist. LOL. I'm not up on these streaming devices....

Neither am I entirely. And thank you for reminding me about MERYL night, I need to check on demand to see if they have “the French lieutenants woman.“

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30 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Neither am I entirely. And thank you for reminding me about MERYL night, I need to check on demand to see if they have “the French lieutenants woman.“

I wanted to watch that, but it was on too late and I was afraid I wouldnt have enough time to record it AND Postcards From the Edge on after (which I did record). I liked the book better (Woman)

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

I wanted to watch that, but it was on too late and I was afraid I wouldnt have enough time to record it AND Postcards From the Edge on after (which I did record). I liked the book better (Woman)

Yeah I’m 2/3 the way through the movie and I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it, except to say that the cinematography is GORGEOUS (Freddie Francis did it, so natch)

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I’ll try to post a full review of THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS WOMAN when I’m at my computer tomorrow, but my initial reaction is that JEREMY IRONS gave the  best performance in the film and STREEP was actually a disappointment (According to the IMDb trivia section for the film she considers her work in this film to be one of her weakest performances.)

i grudgingly agree. Her accent was off and I felt like she played a big scene (In the forest where her Victorian character shares her backstory) wrong. 
I think this film is prime for a remake, especially seeing as how movies about movies and meta-storytelling has gotten increasingly popular over the years.

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