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4 hours ago, Hibi said:

No one watched anything on Meryl night???

I did but it wasn't Meryl.  I may have gotten caught up in season 2 of BBC's The Great Pottery Throwdown.  I wanted to watch Postcards From the Edge, but figured it'd be an easy film to find at the library if I missed it on TCM--or if anything it'd be On Demand.

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The Wild One (1953)

I watched this Marlon Brando film last night.  This is one of Brando's more well known films.  His persona and physical appearance in The Wild One became an icon of the 1950s. 

In this film, Brando plays Johnny, the leader of the local Black Rebels Motorcycle Club (BRMC as is emblazoned across the back of the gang members' motorcycle jackets). Johnny & Co. have just finished invading a motorcycle race and stealing the second place trophy.  They would have stolen first place, but the trophy was too large to hide.  One of the gang members presents Johnny with the trophy which he straps to the front of his motorcycle.  This trophy will end up being a motif throughout the film. The gang then head to the (fictional) small town of Wrightsville, CA.  They almost immediately wear out their welcome by causing a motorist, Art Kleiner, to swerve and crash his vehicle.  Art wants immediate justice, but the town sheriff, Harry Bleeker (Robert Keith) is ineffective and seemingly too timid to dole out any real justice in town.  During the accident, another gang member falls and hurts his leg, leading the group to having to stay in Wrightsville longer than anticipated. While Art Kleiner wants to drive the motorcycle gang out of town, the local bar owner, Frank Bleeker, the sheriff's brother enthusiastically welcomes the gang-- they buy a lot of beer, despite being a tad on the boisterous side.  Tending bar is the sheriff's daughter/Frank's niece, Kathie (Mary Murphy).  Kathie immediately catches Johnny's eye, but she spurns his advances when he asks her to a local dance. 

It is apparent however, that despite her prim and proper exterior, there's something about Johnny's brooding nature and rough exterior that catches her attention.  I get the sense that she's finding herself having a bit of a crush on him, but is seemingly too intimidated by him to act on it.  While I'm not the biggest Marlon Brando fan, I do like his 1950s output, and I will give it to the man: He was very attractive in the 1950s.  If I were Kathie, I'd probably take my chances and go to the dance with him.  While watching Johnny in this film, it becomes apparent that Johnny is perhaps having second thoughts about being in this motorcycle gang.  The other members in the group look up to Johnny and follow his lead, but I can't help but sense some reluctance on Johnny's part to be the leader of such a group.  It seems that he has probably been running around with the gang for quite some time and any other life seems foreign to him at the moment.  However, Kathie represents an "out" or at least something different. Johnny's interest in Kathie wanes however, when he learns she is the sheriff's daughter.  It seems that Johnny has had some run-ins with the cops prior, and harbors a resentment against them.

Lee Marvin appears as Chino, the leader of a rival gang: The Beetles.  The members of the BRMC and The Beetles used to be one gang, but then Johnny split the group up and formed his own group. It would seem that Chino still resents Johnny for leaving The Beetles and forming his own group.  The men end up brawling in the middle of the main drag, causing a local man to drive through the ruckus and inadvertently hit one of Chino's gang.  This leads to Chino pulling the motorist out of his car, then having his gang overturn his vehicle.  After this incident, it's on between the townspeople and the motorcycle gangs.  

In this film, we have the main story about the motorcycle gangs' attempts to intimidate the small townspeople to achieve a sense of justice for their injured gang members. This then causes tension between the gang and the townspeople who do not want "undesirables" in their town.  Which then leads to the townspeople becoming vigilantes to serve their own justice as a response to their feeling that their sheriff is ineffective. I preferred the side story between Johnny and Kathie and wish that more of this storyline was explored.  I thought that Marlon Brando was excellent as Johnny and his mumbling worked well for his character. I thought he was excellent at putting forth a facade of toughness while actually feeling quite depressed at the state of his life. I don't get the sense that Johnny wants to be in the gang.  I think it's the only thing that he knows and he's afraid of leaving the security of a group of people who look up to him.  I particularly liked a scene toward the end where he goes to retrieve his motorcycle and a tear seems to escape his eye. It was a very somber moment for Johnny. 

I thought this was a really great film and I would have liked just a few more minutes added to the running time so that I could see what happens after the official ending.  I even loved the aesthetics of this film--there were a lot of great shots that really gave this film a noir look. 

 

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11 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I did but it wasn't Meryl.  I may have gotten caught up in season 2 of BBC's The Great Pottery Throwdown.  I wanted to watch Postcards From the Edge, but figured it'd be an easy film to find at the library if I missed it on TCM--or if anything it'd be On Demand.

POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE is a DELIGHTFUL movie, If you have not already seen it make it a priority.

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i don't really know that there is much I can add to what i said about THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT'S WOMAN- except that every time I see a movie that FREDDIE FRANCIS did the lighting/cinematography on, I am BLOWN AWAY BY HIS TALENT, and every time I watch a movie he directed (not this one, but a lot of British horror films of the 60's and 70's) I am STUMPED at how someone can be SO GOOD at one part of filmmaking and so so bad at another.

I have never read the JOHN FOWLES book, but I feel like the idea of a film within a  film being shot was clever AND YET, it ABSOLUTELY suffers from the fact that this movie is a 25/75 split, with the modern day scenes/characters/story getting the ABSOLUTELY SHAFTED to the point where it makes the entire film seem incomplete and underdone.

I reiterate that this could be remade

I also reiterate that STREEP's performance was not as good as it should have been, just as A CRY IN THE DARK is THE STREEP MOVIE to cite when people think she is mechanical and more interested in the technical-side of acting, I think THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT'S WOMAN is EXHIBIT A to support that assertion.

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I haven't seen the film (Woman) in years, but I felt the book (which I'd read earlier) was better. Didn't care for Pinter's screenplay with the modern day actors. Maybe the novel was just unadaptable. I thought they should've just filmed it as a straight period drama. It is lovely to look at.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE is a DELIGHTFUL movie, If you have not already seen it make it a priority.

Thanks. I  saw it was TCM On Demand on Dish, so it's available! 

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46 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I haven't seen the film (Woman) in years, but I felt the book (which I'd read earlier) was better. Didn't care for Pinter's screenplay with the modern day actors. Maybe the novel was just unadaptable. I thought they should've just filmed it as a straight period drama. It is lovely to look at.

Yeah, I definitely want to read the book now.

I really like the idea of a film within film where two actors (who are having an affair**) are making a PERIOD FILM realize how much society has (and has not) changed since the time of the story...but it doesn't explore this convention anywhere near enough and STREEP'S modern day character is more of a QUESTION MARK than a character.

i say a remake would work (maybe)

 

**It is worth noting that the imdb plot synopsis at the top of the page for this film is INCORRECT- it labels STREEP and IRONS as playing HUSBAND AND WIFE actors, which they are NOT. He is married, she has a lover or boyfriend and they are screwing around on BOTH of them. This is also of note because I have read some rumors here and there about MERYL STREEP being unfaithful on-set. Apparently she and ED BEGLEY JR had an affair on the set of SHE-DEVIL that almost broke up her marriage.

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MOVIES-TV just had a;  Iconic actor - Dan Duryea "special".    By "special" I mean they ran some ads the previous weeks mentioning this.   

4 films were shown:   Underworld Story,  Too Late for Tears, The Burglar and Scarlett Street.        

Sometimes I wonder if the programmers at Movies-TV visit this forum.   (wink).

Anyhow someone over there is aware of Duryea's legacy during the studio-era.

 

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Oscar winner, Alex Gibney's 2020 Agents of Chaos which just premiered on HBO.  This digs deep into Putin's efforts to manipulate elections and the Trump campaign throwing out the welcome mat.

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I watched two very interesting MGM films which were both meant to be the first installment of a series, but apparently because interest wasn’t there did not move on to DR KILDAREDOM. 
 

EYES IN THE NIGHT which is about a blind detective and his absolutely adorable black German shepherd seeing eye dog named Friday (And I don’t particularly like German shepherds) who get involved in a Nazi plot. Edward Arnold- who is one of the best examples Of an AUTHORITATIVE ACTOR stars, I really do wish he had found a role in a detective series, because he is perfect for the part. ANN HARDING and DONNA REED costar- It’s a bit of an uneven film, but the scenes with the dog are absolutely fantastic. Seriously, the dog should’ve been considered for best supporting. I also thoroughly agree with this movie’s assertion that community theater has been infiltrated by Nazi agents.

then I watched MIRACLES FOR SALE (1939)- Which was the final film of Tod Browning and which I have only read negative things about, and I have to say It is far better than it gets credit for. ROBERT YOUNG stars as a New York City magician who manufactures and sells stage illusions, FRANK CRAVEN is his father and he gets some  laugh out loud funny lines. GLORIA “DRACULA’s DAUGHTER” HOLDEN has an all too brief part as a phony mystic and HENRY HULL has  an absolutely terrific part as a rival magician (miles away from WEREWOLF OF LONDON) This is an absolutely perfect film to be Brownings last because it hits on a lot of notes of his previous movies, psychics vampires, demons, magic tricks, and the completely ludicrous notion of being able to frighten a criminal into confessing their murder by using Scooby Doo methodology. I thoroughly enjoyed it and laughed out loud several times, I really do recommend it although I will note that the denouement needed a rewrite... This is however one of those impossible mystery films where the solution is actually quite clever.

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I mean let’s face it, if a guy in a rubber werewolf mask  can convince you instantly fess up on the spot to multiple murders, you were really not cut out to be a criminal. Leave that to the TRUE sociopaths. 

**I seem to have accidentally attached this image to this post and I meant to attach it to the last one, but I will be damned if I can figure out to delete it.

image.jpeg

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54 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also wish EDWARD ARNOLD and LIONEL BARRYMORE Had starred in a buddy detective series for MGM where they HATE LIFE but solve murders.

I liked Bugs Bunny's imitation of Lionel Barrymore, when he was showing off in a hospital wheelchair:

15thumb.jpg

("*snrrrt*, GEN-tlemen of the juryyy, YOU can't send that poor boy *snrrt!* to prisonnn!....")

Oscar winner, Alex Gibney's 2020 Agents of Chaos which just premiered on HBO.  This digs deep into Putin's efforts to manipulate elections and the Trump's campaign throwing out the welcome mat.

Also, haven't watched it, but the current documentary Our President has been floating around on streaming, showing footage of just to what bizarre, surreal lengths Putin's state-propaganda machine was trying to demonize Hillary Clinton's 2016 election, and sell Trump to the Russian people as the Great White Holy Anti-Hillary Savior....

No idea why they're still meddling in '18 and '20 elections where Hillary isn't running, it's just...more sort of a pride thing for them.  They literally miss being the old Cold-War bullies.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

EDWARD ARNOLD and LIONEL BARRYMORE Had starred in a buddy detective series

I would have rather seen John Barrymore with Arnold-he would have brought some haughty glamor to it. Buddy movies work great when one of the buddies appeals to women, like Hope & Crosby. But I agree-Edward Arnold is amazing, very similar acting style as Lionel B.

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Blondie's Lucky Day Poster

Blondie's Lucky Day (1946) Movies ! TV Network 7/10

Dagwood is left in charge of the office, he hires a former WAC as an architect, Dithers returns and fires him.

#17 in the series, but this is one of the best so far, many funny scenes and a fast moving story. The war is over and the mayor wants businessmen to hire returning veterans. Dagwood is asked to a meeting with executives. One of them is played by John Hamilton, who would have his greatest fame as blustering Perry White on TV series The Adventures Of Superman. Betty Jane the WAC is warmly welcomed by Blondie and family. After Dagwood is fired he tries to start his own construction company. He attempts to get a contract with a theater company owner. A plot twist has him being fleeced by the playboy son of the theater owner. Funniest scene is Dagwood posing as a masseur and he discovers a knockout nerve pinch later used by Spock on  Star Trek. 

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The Barefoot Contessa (1954).  

I watched this film last night.  I liked it it was interesting and I liked the series of flashbacks used to inform the audience as to the series of events leading up to the funeral of Maria Vargas (Ava Gardner).  Maria's funeral is the first scene of the film, so there's no spoilers here.  The events in the film unfold through the narration provided by three men seen at the funeral: Harry Vargas (Humphrey Bogart), Oscar Muldoon (Edmond O'Brien), and Count Vincenzo Torlato-Favrini (Rossano Brazzi).  The three men recount their time with Vargas and help fill in the blanks as to what could have led to her (presumably) early death.  The film could drag a little in spots, but as I saw more and more of Maria, I needed to know how she died.  That mystery kept me watching and ultimately, I enjoyed the film.

The basic premise is that Harry Vargas is a down and out film director who is forced to take a job with wealthy (inherited money, not self-made) businessman, Kirk Edwards.  Kirk is a jerk, plain and simple.  He acts like an overgrown child who throws fits when he can't get what he wants. Kirk has decided that he wants to finance and produce a film starring a glamorous unknown leading lady as a means to boost his ego.  He basically wants to discover someone and make a star out of her.  He hears about a Spanish dancer, Maria Vargas, who performs at a nightclub in Madrid.  He, Harry, and publicist Oscar Muldoon go to Madrid to see Maria. Oscar, through a closed door, tries to sweet talk Maria into sitting down at their table and speaking with Kirk, but she is uninterested.  Harry goes to her dressing room himself to try and talk her into meeting his employer.  Harry introduces himself and his movie director credentials intrigue Maria.  She takes an immediate liking to Harry because of his prestigious movie background.  Eventually, Harry is able to convince Maria to go to Hollywood and make a screen test.

Harry will be Maria's main confidant and friend throughout the film.  There is no romance angle as Harry is very happily married.  However, he understands Maria's pride and free spirited nature.  Maria does not want to compromise her integrity just to make a few bucks in Hollywood.  It is obvious in this film that many men seem to think that throwing money at a woman is all that is needed to woo her.  Maria, fortunately, is more complicated than that and realizes that the men flashing their wealth have absolutely nothing of substance to offer. 

Oscar Muldoon is Maria's publicist.  He is a bit of a weasel at first and delivers a totally insincere speech about stardom to Maria as a means to convince her to go to Hollywood.  Maria is uninterested.  Eventually, Oscar and Maria become part of the "international set" and travel in a group together to various European hot spots. His acquaintance with Maria is somewhat of a bystander in that he observes her interact with other men who may or may not be genuinely interested in her.  I thought Edmond O'Brien did a great job in his role.  He definitely looked a little different than he had in previous films of his that I'd seen, although I think that this is the first time I've seen him in a color film.

Finally, the Count Vincenzo is introduced as Maria's widower.  He recounts meeting Maria while she's traveling with the international set and how he ultimately makes her acquaintance and why he was interested in her.  It seems that the Count and his sister, Eleanora (Valentina Cortese) are the last in line for their bloodline and the family's legacy will end with them, since neither are married nor have children.  The Count is also harboring a secret. 

I thought the photography and costumes in this film were gorgeous.  Jack Cardiff was the cinematographer and aesthetically, the film looks fantastic.  I thought Ava Gardner did an excellent job, even with her accent.  It didn't sound fake or exaggerated.  I know that Ava Gardner lived in Madrid for a long time, I don't know if it was before or after this film.  I'm curious if she knew how to speak Spanish, or if she just memorized her Spanish dialogue for this film, but I thought she delivered it very well and sounded like an authentic Spanish speaker. I thought she looked gorgeous in this film and loved her costumes.  I especially enjoyed her lavender gown with black applique flowers on the bust with a matching cape (!). Her white, Grecian looking dress that she wears to model for her statue was also beautiful and looked fantastic on Ava. 

I watched a TCM print of this film and there was a slight green-ish outline around some of the characters in the scenes (I think this is called "haloing" ?) making the scene look ever so slightly out of focus. I would love to see a more high-quality print of this film. 

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43 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

The Barefoot Contessa (1954).  

I watched this film last night.  I liked it it was interesting and I liked the series of flashbacks used to inform the audience as to the series of events leading up to the funeral of Maria Vargas (Ava Gardner).  Maria's funeral is the first scene of the film, so there's no spoilers here.  The events in the film unfold through the narration provided by three men seen at the funeral: Harry Vargas (Humphrey Bogart), Oscar Muldoon (Edmond O'Brien), and Count Vincenzo Torlato-Favrini (Rossano Brazzi).  The three men recount their time with Vargas and help fill in the blanks as to what could have led to her (presumably) early death.  The film could drag a little in spots, but as I saw more and more of Maria, I needed to know how she died.  That mystery kept me watching and ultimately, I enjoyed the film.

The basic premise is that Harry Vargas is a down and out film director who is forced to take a job with wealthy (inherited money, not self-made) businessman, Kirk Edwards.  Kirk is a jerk, plain and simple.  He acts like an overgrown child who throws fits when he can't get what he wants. Kirk has decided that he wants to finance and produce a film starring a glamorous unknown leading lady as a means to boost his ego.  He basically wants to discover someone and make a star out of her.  He hears about a Spanish dancer, Maria Vargas, who performs at a nightclub in Madrid.  He, Harry, and publicist Oscar Muldoon go to Madrid to see Maria. Oscar, through a closed door, tries to sweet talk Maria into sitting down at their table and speaking with Kirk, but she is uninterested.  Harry goes to her dressing room himself to try and talk her into meeting his employer.  Harry introduces himself and his movie director credentials intrigue Maria.  She takes an immediate liking to Harry because of his prestigious movie background.  Eventually, Harry is able to convince Maria to go to Hollywood and make a screen test.

Harry will be Maria's main confidant and friend throughout the film.  There is no romance angle as Harry is very happily married.  However, he understands Maria's pride and free spirited nature.  Maria does not want to compromise her integrity just to make a few bucks in Hollywood.  It is obvious in this film that many men seem to think that throwing money at a woman is all that is needed to woo her.  Maria, fortunately, is more complicated than that and realizes that the men flashing their wealth have absolutely nothing of substance to offer. 

Oscar Muldoon is Maria's publicist.  He is a bit of a weasel at first and delivers a totally insincere speech about stardom to Maria as a means to convince her to go to Hollywood.  Maria is uninterested.  Eventually, Oscar and Maria become part of the "international set" and travel in a group together to various European hot spots. His acquaintance with Maria is somewhat of a bystander in that he observes her interact with other men who may or may not be genuinely interested in her.  I thought Edmond O'Brien did a great job in his role.  He definitely looked a little different than he had in previous films of his that I'd seen, although I think that this is the first time I've seen him in a color film.

Finally, the Count Vincenzo is introduced as Maria's widower.  He recounts meeting Maria while she's traveling with the international set and how he ultimately makes her acquaintance and why he was interested in her.  It seems that the Count and his sister, Eleanora (Valentina Cortese) are the last in line for their bloodline and the family's legacy will end with them, since neither are married nor have children.  The Count is also harboring a secret. 

I thought the photography and costumes in this film were gorgeous.  Jack Cardiff was the cinematographer and aesthetically, the film looks fantastic.  I thought Ava Gardner did an excellent job, even with her accent.  It didn't sound fake or exaggerated.  I know that Ava Gardner lived in Madrid for a long time, I don't know if it was before or after this film.  I'm curious if she knew how to speak Spanish, or if she just memorized her Spanish dialogue for this film, but I thought she delivered it very well and sounded like an authentic Spanish speaker. I thought she looked gorgeous in this film and loved her costumes.  I especially enjoyed her lavender gown with black applique flowers on the bust with a matching cape (!). Her white, Grecian looking dress that she wears to model for her statue was also beautiful and looked fantastic on Ava. 

I watched a TCM print of this film and there was a slight green-ish outline around some of the characters in the scenes (I think this is called "haloing" ?) making the scene look ever so slightly out of focus. I would love to see a more high-quality print of this film. 

There are very, very few classic movies that I would use the “H“ word for. There are some I dislike, there are some I don’t get it, there are some I think are overrated. There are very few I hate.

I HATE this movie. 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

***Please don’t think I’m saying for one second it’s not OK that you like it. I just personally hate it.So much so in fact I can’t ever keep my yapp shut when someone mentions it.

Lol. It's okay.  I don't care. I also love Gilda which a lot of people on here seem to dislike.  

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I apologize for the above post, I am having some technical difficulties with my phone And damned if I can find out how to delete a post or quote ever since that re-re-design.

(For the record, I Was *trying* to post a picture of Rita Hayworth, but I am having a really hard time posting pictures ever since the redesign as well!)

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I watched CAST A DARK SHADOW a 1955 BRITISH thriller, sort of a redux of NIGHT MUST FALL with a touch of BLITHE SPIRIT And with some absolutely electric acting, especially from DIRK BOGARDE, MARGARET LOCKWOOD And an actcress that I am *especially* fond of- KAY WALSH. 

The cast is very British and impeccable, the slang is heavy but fun. Dirk reads a muscleman magazine one scene!!!

This was for some odd reason very badly reviewed and damned if I know why because it is an awful, awful lot of fun. I started watching it very casually and by the midsection was absolutely wrapped. Highly recommend this one.

again:
Dynamite acting.

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