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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

He is a punch drunk boxer in PAT AND MIKE, but if you don’t like him in THE MARRYING KIND. you probably would not like him in this either

also GODS LITTLE ACRE

Hmm.  I have seen Pat and Mike, I don't remember him  in this movie.  I mostly hated his character in The Marrying Kind.  He was always yelling; but he wasn't yelling in a bufoonish way like Broderick Crawford's character in Born Yesterday.  Ray's yelling seemed more like it could escalate to domestic violence in a split-second kind of way.  It made me uncomfortable and feel horrible for Judy Holliday.  

I have God's Little Acre on my DVR.  I recorded it originally for Robert Ryan.

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39 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Hmm.  I have seen Pat and Mike, I don't remember him  in this movie.  I mostly hated his character in The Marrying Kind.  He was always yelling; but he wasn't yelling in a bufoonish way

Ray's yelling seemed more like it could escalate to domestic violence in a split-second kind of way.  It made me uncomfortable and feel horrible for Judy Holliday.  

I have God's Little Acre on my DVR.  I recorded it originally for Robert Ryan.

WOW! ALDO RAY is a major character in PAT AND MIkE- I even recall his name in the film- DAVIE HUCKO. He's a boxer client of TRACY'S who  develops a relationship with Hepburn's character and she builds up his self esteem. it's a VERY SHOWY ROLE, and the fact that ALDO RAY was (I think) making his DEBUT opposite TWO HUGE NAMES and with almost no experience and he DIVES HEAD FIRST INTO THE PART means something to me.

one of these days i am going to make a lesbian version of PAT AND MIKE

I don't recall picking up violence from ray in THE MARRYING KIND- it's such a challenging film to watch, although I like it and think JUDY HOLIDAY gives one of the best performances ever in it.

GOD'S LITTLE ACRE is ****ing WEIRD. ALDO gained weight by the time he did it and he has a love scene with TINE "GINGER" LOUISE that was illicit at the time but is TAMESVILLE by today's standards.

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33 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

WOW! ALDO RAY is a major character in PAT AND MIkE- I even recall his name in the film- DAVIE HUCKO. He's a boxer client of TRACY'S who  develops a relationship with Hepburn's character and she builds up his self esteem. it's a VERY SHOWY ROLE, and the fact that ALDO RAY was (I think) making his DEBUT opposite TWO HUGE NAMES and with almost no experience and he DIVES HEAD FIRST INTO THE PART means something to me.

one of these days i am going to make a lesbian version of PAT AND MIKE

I don't recall picking up violence from ray in THE MARRYING KIND- it's such a challenging film to watch, although I like it and think JUDY HOLIDAY gives one of the best performances ever in it.

GOD'S LITTLE ACRE is ****ing WEIRD. ALDO gained weight by the time he did it and he has a love scene with TINE "GINGER" LOUISE that was illicit at the time but is TAMESVILLE by today's standards.

Lol.  Apparently, when I watched Pat and Mike, I was not paying attention at all.  All I remember is Hepburn playing golf.  I will give this another watch. If you made a lesbian version of Pat and Mike, you wouldn't even need to change the title! I think a lesbian version of In This Our Life would also work, with the characters' names intact. 

Maybe The Marrying Kind is another film I need to rewatch.

Okay.  I'm interested in this scene with Tina Louise.  Which by the way, now there's a new model (instagram "influencer" ?? I honestly don't know what this person does) who is also named Tina Louise.  It is confusing when I see a headline about Tina Louise dating some new young actor, and I'm thinking "get it, girl" and then realizing that obviously, they are not talking about 85-year old Tina. Tina pops up in movies here and there, it's interesting to see her not being Ginger.  She actually is okay as an actor, I can understand her resentment being typecast by Gilligan's Island.  She's also in one of my favorite dumb teen beach movies, For Those Who Think Young, with James Darren, Pamela Tiffin, Nancy Sinatra, and Bob Denver! She plays Topaz, the burlesque dancer who is also a math tutor as a side hustle. And I just re-watched The Stepford Wives the other night (a movie that I love), and Tina plays Charmaine, the tennis-loving wife of Tom Willis from "The Jeffersons" who ends up a victim  of the stepford husbands. 

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2 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I saw "The Reivers" with Steve McQueen from 1969.  Watched it yesterday for the first time.  It was good.  Overall, to me, not much of a plot, but it was a good movie.

 

I tried to read the Faulkner book this was based on recently and COULD NOT GET MORE THAN 30 PAGES IN. Too meandering and hard-to-follow. (And I read, understood, and liked SANCTUARY and ABSALOM! ABSALOM!)

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

 Tina pops up in movies here and there, it's interesting to see her not being Ginger.  She actually is okay as an actor, I can understand her resentment being typecast by Gilligan's Island

Being typecast as the GLAMOROUS MOVIE STAR.

The suffering!

The indignity!

it's the reason MARIA OUSPENSKAYA died young.

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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Being typecast as the GLAMOROUS MOVIE STAR.

The suffering!

The indignity!

it's the reason MARIA OUSPENSKAYA died young.

I know.  She is a pop-culture icon, so there are definitely worse things in life.  I bet had she received residuals (which I understand none of the cast members did, as it wasn't a thing in the 60s), she wouldn't have made such a fuss. 

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Look up the 1968 movie on IMDB (pretty good cast).  I saw it on TV.  Thanks for the clarification on Woody Allen.  There was a version with Michelle Pfeiffer and Kevin Kline (I think Michelle's husband directed it).

The above was at least a day old.  Several comments.  William Faulkner is stream of consciousness which often makes him difficult to read.  Saw the Reivers a few years ago - Steve McQ. - great actor but not the easiest to work with.

Didn't know Maria O. died young - really scary in The Werewolf (with Lon Chaney Jr.).  Interesting remarks re: Tina Louise (liked her over Mary Ann - however, they sure packed a lot of clothes for a 3 hour tour).

As far as residuals from TV shows, I think many of today's stars have James Garner to thank (though I'm unsure if he ever saw anything.

WGN runs Blue Bloods repeats and I didn't realize that some of the actors (Greg Jbara (? - unsure of name - the one who plays Kevin Kline's brother in In and Out) wasn't in the first season.

 

As for tonight, I'm starting with a horror classic on TCM:  Dead of Night (if you are familiar with some of the classic Twilight Zone episodes - you may recognize some of the individuals tales).  Great cast.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I know.  She is a pop-culture icon, so there are definitely worse things in life.  I bet had she received residuals (which I understand none of the cast members did, as it wasn't a thing in the 60s), she wouldn't have made such a fuss. 

Tina Louise was also in the first season of the hit TV show "Dallas".  She played Julie, who was Jock Ewing's secretary.  After Jock suffered a heart attack, he was pampered by his wife and kids and smothered so much that they drove him into Julie's arms, and they had an affair.   Poor thing died at the end of an episode (possibly the Season 1 finale?) when she 'fell' off the top of a parking garage!  Naturally, J.R. happened to be on the roof with her when she fell.  She had a great line pointed at J.R. about his dad.  "You treat Jock like a child.  I treat him like a man!". 

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Just now, midwestan said:

Tina Louise was also in the first season of the hit TV show "Dallas".  She played Julie, who was Jock Ewing's secretary.  After Jock suffered a heart attack, he was pampered by his wife and kids and smothered so much that they drove him into Julie's arms, and they had an affair.   Poor thing died at the end of an episode (possibly the Season 1 finale?) when she 'fell' off the top of a parking garage!  Naturally, J.R. happened to be on the roof with her when she fell.  She had a great line pointed at J.R. about his dad.  "You treat Jock like a child.  I treat him like a man!". 

She was actually good in her brief part there, and more is the pity they killed her off so quickly. She only appeared in three episodes in the 5-episode miniseries that began everything (now referred to as Season 1) and 2 episodes in the first whole season (aka Season 2). She didn't even make it to the season finale; 7 more episodes appeared in that season after her death.

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6 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I saw "The Reivers" with Steve McQueen from 1969.  Watched it yesterday for the first time.  It was good.  Overall, to me, not much of a plot, but it was a good movie.  Not sure why the opening credits said introducing Mitch Vogel, since he did "Your, Mine, and Ours" the year before.

Maybe he got the 'Introducing' credit in 1969 because he had a more substantial role?  Being in a film where you're 1 of 15 children, it's pretty tough to stand out in the crowd.  At least, that would be my theory on the subject.

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I know.  She is a pop-culture icon, so there are definitely worse things in life.  I bet had she received residuals (which I understand none of the cast members did, as it wasn't a thing in the 60s), she wouldn't have made such a fuss. 

Also, according to Dawn Wells'  (aka Mary Ann's) tell-all, Louise never really got along with the TV cast, and vice versa--
Which is another reason she didn't bother to come back for the "Rescue From Gilligan's Island" TV-movie reunion trilogy.

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Also, according to Dawn Wells'  (aka Mary Ann's) tell-all, Louise never really got along with the TV cast, and vice versa--
Which is another reason she didn't bother to come back for the "Rescue From Gilligan's Island" TV-movie reunion trilogy.

From what I've read, Tina Louise felt that the show was beneath her and that she was mislead as to what her role would be.  Apparently she didn't notice that the show wasn't called "Ginger's Island."  

I would think at the time, either Jim Backus or Bob Denver would have been the biggest stars on the show as both had been in quite a few movies and/or television shows by the time Gilligan rolled around. 

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ALDO RAY?  

As a kid I used to like seeing him show up in several war movies, but NEVER could conceive of him ever being a heartthrob!  And most women I'd occasionally talk about this with said the same.

"Eye of the beholder" and what not, eh?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Blondie's Holiday Poster

Blondie's Holiday (1947) Movies! TV Network 4/10

Blondie is invited to a high school reunion and mistakenly gets Dagwood to pay for the 40 guests. 

This is #20 in the series and it is starting to wear thin. Dagwood gets fired (again) and gets involved with bookies. The most interesting part is two guest actors. Grant Mitchell plays a client Mr Radcliffe is trying to deal with. Mitchell was best known as the harried businessman stuck with Monty Wooley at his house in The Man Who Came To Dinner. Sid Tomack plays a fast talking horse handicapper who convinces Dagwood to play the ponies. Tomack appeared in several episodes of The Adventures Of Superman in many crooked parts.

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

ALDO RAY?  

As a kid I used to like seeing him show up in several war movies, but NEVER could conceive of him ever being a heartthrob!  And most women I'd occasionally talk about this with said the same.

"Eye of the beholder" and what not, eh?  ;) 

Sepiatone

no, i think you're just one of those increasingly rare 100% Heterosexuals- solid 5 on the Kinsey scale- some men can look at the world's HOTTEST GUY, shrug and genuinely mean it when they say "I don't get it."

(and bless you for it, we wouldn't be around without you and all)

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The House of Secrets (1936)

An American inherits an estate located near London. The solicitor handling the matter informs him that he must agree to never sell the property and the next day advises him to sell and return to America. His attempt to enter the house is met with guard dogs, an old man with a pistol and a beautiful girl. The police refuse to help and threaten to arrest him as a person of unsound mind. He suspects the house is being used for nefarious purposes but every person he meets are against him finding out what is being done there.

The great mystery is why a viewer should care. The chemistry between the male and female leads is on a par with watching litmus paper turn red when dipped in soda water. The script builds tension re: his attempts to penetrate the secret of the house by having the girl endlessly repeat that she can not explain and that he should go away. The secret is itself perfectly anti-climatic. A subplot deals with pirate treasure hidden on the property. This is given a full four minutes in snippets throughout the last half of the movie. Solving the mystery of its location adds one more minute and the treasure appears for slightly less than one second. Wow and yawn.

There is nothing wrong with this movie. There is nothing right with it. It was obviously written, produced, directed and acted so that all involved could receive their weekly paycheck. 

 

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20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

no, i think you're just one of those increasingly rare 100% Heterosexuals- solid 5 on the Kinsey scale- some men can look at the world's HOTTEST GUY, shrug and genuinely mean it when they say "I don't get it."

(and bless you for it, we wouldn't be around without you and all)

Really, most men can recognize when another man is physically attractive.  No matter how much "man" they are on your presumptive Kinsey scale.  But perhaps their insecurities prevent them from admitting they do thinking possibly it'll make them look less "manly" to the other guys.  ;) 

In fact(while we're at it) just WHOM makes the determination as to who's the "world's HOTTEST GUY" anyway?  And wouldn't that be based solely on that person's, or perhaps panel's personal taste, and only make that man the "hottest" guy to mostly them

It's a pretty pathetic way to live,  letting other people determine your own likes and dislikes.

Sepiatone

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I watched HOUSE OF DARK SHADOWS, which I have reviewed before.

I don't know what else to say except I wish they had found a way to spend a little more money on the technical side of this movie- A LOT of the sound and dialogue is ADR and FOLEY and the camera is unsteady in a few scenes, they also didn't take the time to set up lots of different shots- sort of trying to shoot it like a TV show in as full and unedited takes as possible with no switching between close-ups and wide shots.

Also A WHOLE LOT OF "NIGHT" scenes and one scene in a POURING RAINSTORM were obviously filmed at HIGH NOON during the SUMMER SOLSTICE and some really half-hearted DAY FOR NIGHT processing just serves to highlight that DAMN IT SURE IS BRIGHT AT NIGHT IN MAINE.  

DON'T GET ME WRONG, I LIKE THE MOVIE A LOT, but the same story with the same actors but a little more "filmic" in style would;ve been REALLY been something.

Also the same movie with GRAYSON "DR. JULIA HOFFMAN" HALL wearing TIM CURRY'S FRANK N. FURTER make-up would've been something too, pity this came 4 years before ROCKY HORROR.

Also the guy playing ROGER COLLINS reminded me A LOT of MIKE PENCE.

818-hods-julia-house-of-dark-shadows-mir

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The Trip (1967)

I'm a big fan of Roger Corman, though I had never watched this one. I had a lot of fun with it. It's now probably my favorite psychedelic drug film from that era. There's lots of trippy imagery and the story is actually pretty funny in places. I was also surprised at the amount of arthouse influence present. Corman has cited figures like Ingmar Bergman as being big inspirations, though I was taken aback by just how abstract and/or disturbing some of these scenes are.

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A Shriek in the Night (1933)

 

This movie delivers what it promises as the opening is a loud shriek as a body falls from a tall building at nighttime. There is a loud shriek heard also prior to the discovery of each murder victim throughout the movie.

Ginger Rogers is a naïve young girl who recently became the live-in secretary of the renowned philanthropist who died in the opening scene.  It is a proper situation as Lillian Harmer is the chaperone as the "little bit dumb but very respectable" live-in housekeeper. Purnell Pratt is the wisecracking inspector who wants to believe the death is murder rather than suicide because murders are much more fun. Arthur Hoyt as his assistant is so meek and unassuming that his observation that it would be pleasant to have a girl like that living-in elicits the inspector's response: "I wonder if I could have been wrong about you all this time."

Lyle Talbot is a typical 1930s newspaperman who knows all the speakeasies and is continually chasing skirts. It is slowly revealed that Ginger Rogers is the skirt he is currently pursuing and that she is actually a hard-bitten newspaperwoman who excels at sarcastic retorts. She took the position as the philanthropist's secretary so she could uncover his connections to organized crime.

The jokes and wisecracks continue to flow as the body count rises. 

This is a prototypical comedy murder mystery which presages The Thin Man series and Torchy Blane movies. The chemistry between Ginger Rogers and Lyle Talbot adds much to the story. 

I love Ginger Rogers very much in her early roles as a strong, independent and intelligent woman who happens to have a slight weakness for a certain fella. She and Talbot were equally as well matched in:  The Thirteenth Guest (1932). I wish very much that they had made more movies together.

4/5

 

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On 10/16/2020 at 1:50 PM, speedracer5 said:

I know.  She is a pop-culture icon, so there are definitely worse things in life.  I bet had she [Tina Louise]   received residuals (which I understand none of the cast members did, as it wasn't a thing in the 60s), she wouldn't have made such a fuss. 

Dawn Wells (Mary Ann) is the only cast member of GILLIGAN ISLAND who received significant residuals for reruns of the show. Everyone else signed what was the standard television contract at that time, which gave an actor a flat per episode rate plus a residual payment for the first five repeats of the episode. Dawn Wells’s agent at the time (who was also her husband), however, negotiated an amended residual clause for her so she still gets paid for syndicated airings.

I admit I’m a fan of Tina Louise and that Ginger Grant is my favorite GILLIGAN’S ISLAND character.

In a college revue some friends and I performed the Honeybees’ song “You Need Us” from “The Don’t Bug The Mosquitoes” episode. And, of course, I did Ginger’s part. I didn’t perform it in drag, but I did get to wear Jack Tripper shorts. 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

the Honeybees’ song “You Need Us” from “The Don’t Bug The Mosquitoes” episode

I've never seen a Gilligan's Island episode, but I sure loved that clip! Adorable. And thanks for that interesting info re:residuals. 

I just finished reading William Shatner's musings and a standout sentiment he makes is: Always do the best job you can, no matter what the circumstances or setbacks. He cited support parts in plays with a terrible star and of course a schlocky TV show. Shatner says you NEVER KNOW the life of that performance, nor who maybe seeing it, where it could lead, so just give your best. That clip clearly shows all the talent on the screen working under some awful production circumstances.

Last night I tuned into TCM at 8:08, catching PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED. I've only seen the film once, in 1986-7 at the theater. I was a teen & on a date. I remembered only that I kind of liked it, remember it being visually beautiful sets/costumes and that Peggy Sue was an adult transported back to her teenage life. A time travel fantasy.

So I had missed the opening, but knew where we were in the story. I LOL when recognizing Nicholas Cage with crazy teeth & hair, but quickly became absorbed in the story. I was pleasantly surprised recognizing several actors who became big stars and cameos of classic stars.

Kathleen Turner was perfectly cast for this, as she has youthful teenage qualities to her face or possibly it was lighting & make up. But she acted like an adult in a teen world. Cage definitely harnessed the crazy teen boy persona in his performance. I found myself completely charmed by the end of this film, loving the fantasy aspect of looking back on your life choices. The point of the story is you probably have forgotten some of the motivation for making those choices, this movie illustrates.

Of COURSE I thought the movie was "OK" as a teen but love it as a 60 year old sitting around during a pandemic watching old movies. Much better & cuter than I remembered. Although several of her "predictions" of what the future would bring are already obsolete, like **** hose. (I hate the bare legged look) I also call foul with her "writing" a hit song. She Loves You wasn't a hit because of the song, but who sang it.

Glad TCM shows movies made in the 80's. Does anyone else see rough continents in the clouds above her head in the poster?

Peggy_Sue_Got_Married.jpg

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19 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched HOUSE OF DARK SHADOWS, which I have reviewed before.

I don't know what else to say except I wish they had found a way to spend a little more money on the technical side of this movie- A LOT of the sound and dialogue is ADR and FOLEY and the camera is unsteady in a few scenes, they also didn't take the time to set up lots of different shots- sort of trying to shoot it like a TV show in as full and unedited takes as possible with no switching between close-ups and wide shots.

Also A WHOLE LOT OF "NIGHT" scenes and one scene in a POURING RAINSTORM were obviously filmed at HIGH NOON during the SUMMER SOLSTICE and some really half-hearted DAY FOR NIGHT processing just serves to highlight that DAMN IT SURE IS BRIGHT AT NIGHT IN MAINE.  

DON'T GET ME WRONG, I LIKE THE MOVIE A LOT, but the same story with the same actors but a little more "filmic" in style would;ve been REALLY been something.

Also the same movie with GRAYSON "DR. JULIA HOFFMAN" HALL wearing TIM CURRY'S FRANK N. FURTER make-up would've been something too, pity this came 4 years before ROCKY HORROR.

Also the guy playing ROGER COLLINS reminded me A LOT of MIKE PENCE.

818-hods-julia-house-of-dark-shadows-mir

LOL. I recorded this to watch at a future date. Halloween? (which is on a Sat. this year and FULL MOON!)

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