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15 hours ago, Hibi said:

In her autobio, Turner complained about working with Perkins and said he would always snort "poppers" before a take and she hated working with him......

I remember when it came out that she also mentioned how NICOLAS CAGE stole a dog while they were filming PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED and he sued her for libel in England.

I have no idea how it turned out, but I am 100% TEAM KATHLEEN.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I saw DEAR HEART the first time last year and loved it! I'm no fan of Ford either, so double surprise how much I liked it. I's call it a lighthearted romance.

It was SO good.  I'd watch it again!  I looove Glenn Ford!!  One of my top 5 favorite actors.

Lori

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I liked Romancing the Stone but The Jewel in the Nile was pretty lame.  I think Michael Douglas had an affair with Kathleen Turner when he was married to his first wife.  I can't watch the War of the Roses (won't spoil ending if you haven't seen it) because some of it nauseates me.

As for what I watched last night, I started Peter Cushing/Christopher Lee version of The Hound.  It can't hold a candle to Basil Rathbone version.  Even if Nigel Bruce doesn't quite fit my idea of John Watson, Basil Rathbone looked like the drawings of Holmes.  I also remember seeing the hound with phosphorescent paint on it.  Truly scary.  Read the novel (read all of Sherlock Holmes) and have a DVD of the Rathbone version.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I saw DEAR HEART the first time last year and loved it! I'm no fan of Ford either, so double surprise how much I liked it. I's call it a lighthearted romance.

Watched Dear Heart yesterday, I've seen the film at least 3 times before. I LOVE that film, that's why I make a point of watching it each time it's shown. Geraldine Page is a marvelous actress, great in this role as the friendly, hopeful, generous  out of towner. I like Glenn Ford a lot and thought he worked well with Geraldine  and loved seeing Angela as the pain in the neck fiancee.

The Mancini theme song is beautiful and  touching, perfect for this film. The song was a big hit, very popular when I was growing up.

Loved the b&w look of the film and took me back to the '60's in NY. I think with the way we're all feeling right now, it was a great choice of a film to be shown . Evie's sweetness and hopefulness and the idea that a lasting romance that was unlikely to happen did happen was uplifting, at least for me. Sort of reminded me of Billy Wilder'sThe Apartment. when Jack and Shirley fall in love and another Delbert Mann film ( he directed Dear Heart) that's a very favorite too, Marty.  The idea the 2 people, who are lonely and dissatisfied with the way their lives are, are at the right place at the right time and find each other.,

Dear Heart is a sweet, uplifting, lovely  film, the critics at that time  may not have raved about the film but I think it was terrific. At any rate, love this film, I'm a sucker for 1960's films that take place in NY. and makes me forget about our world right now, at least for 2 hours.

edited by me

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I know right? 
I’m wondering if there’s anyone *I* could sue for libel in the UK. 

I guess  CAGE is on her permanent SH-T List. I'm sure he's on others......

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21 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I guess  Clay is on her permanent SH-T List. I'm sure he's on others......

I think you mean CAGE. NICHOLAS CLAY is no longer with us, but he was the SMOKINH HOT actor who was in EVIL UNDER THE SUN, THE NIGHT DIGGER and EXCALIBUR.

 

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30 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think you mean CAGE. NICHOLAS CLAY is no longer with us, but he was the SMOKINH HOT actor who was in EVIL UNDER THE SUN, THE NIGHT DIGGER and EXCALIBUR.

 

Whoops! Yes, CAGE. He's not well liked.

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Well, this looks like an interesting thread...  As such, I've actually watched 5 films in the last 5 days, so, I'll give it a go.  Here are those 5 films and my thoughts on them...

Exit Smiling (1926) – When it comes to silent comedies, I’m getting a bit tired of always going for Chaplin, Keaton, and Lloyd.  In Exit Smiling, comedienne Beatrice Lillie does a wonderful job playing a maid trying to break into acting with a travelling theater troupe.  As an actress, I understand Lillie really preferred the real-time feedback of a live audience, but she did make several films, the last being as late as 1967.

Big City Blues (1932) – After inheriting some money, a young man (Eric Linden) heads to New York City for a better life.  As he gets on the train, the station agent bets a friend, “He’ll be back.”  Big surprise – he gets to NYC and his money goes to scammers…  Also stars Joan Blondell, directed by Mervyn LeRoy.  We chose this one because we just had a long day and it was getting late.  With a runtime of 63 minutes and its lively comedic nature, it was a perfect choice for the evening.

The Password Is Courage (1962) – Based on fact, this film chronicles some of Sgt Major Charles Coward’s experiences in and out of WWII POW camps.  IMDb kind of suggests it may have been an inspiration for the TV series, Hogan’s Heroes, claiming similarities in material and characters.  While I saw similar antics on behalf of the prisoners, I didn’t really see any similarities between characters.  I enjoyed it, though.  Released from the UK only a year prior, I found it to be an interesting version of Hollywood’s, The Great Escape (1963).  Uhhh….  Or would that be the other way around…

Unholy Partners (1941) – Crime drama where Edward G. Robinson partners with a crooked gambler to start a newspaper tabloid post WWI.  In recent years we have a whole new respect for Robinson.  He’s not just that gangster; he’s done good work in serious dramas and comedies.  

The Firemen's Ball (1967) – Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, this film was filmed in and released from Czechoslovakia.  Interestingly, it was later banned by the communist regime in Czechoslovakia in 1968.  It's a fun comedy about a volunteer fire department throwing a party for a former boss - and all sorts of "stuff" just happens.  Director, Milos Forman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest) has an interesting bio.  If you’re not familiar with him, look him up.
 

 

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4 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Whoops! Yes, CAGE. He's not well liked.

I know. Is there anyone who knows anything about him who DOESN'T THINK him stealing a Chihuahua sounds 100% ON-BRAND?

He probably did it and he probably named it KAL-EL and had it bronzed-alive and mounted on the hood on a Dodge Dart.

(He's NUTS)

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OK. I get this site is about old movies, but I have to share my thoughts on THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO  SEVEN which I just watched on Netflix. Please forgive me. It was excellent. At age 70 I lived through this period in the late 60s.  As an avid opponent of the Vietnam War, this movie dredged up feelings I had over 50 years ago. In full disclosure, while I actively participated in antiwar protests while in college I was drafted in the last call in 1972. Since my father was a WWII veteran I knew I simply could not resist by going to Canada or whatever else was available. Luckily for me the war ended while I was in basic training and I never left the country. However, The Chicago Seven were and continue to be heroes in my mind. The movie accurately portrays what happened during the months long trial. Aaron Sorkin is an amazing film maker. I think he did a great job with this film. It's uncanny how the events from so long ago mirror some of what is happening in our country today.  If you are a student of history, I highly recommend this movie.

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6 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I liked Romancing the Stone but The Jewel in the Nile was pretty lame.  I think Michael Douglas had an affair with Kathleen Turner when he was married to his first wife.

 

 

I love "Romancing the Stone".  I saw "Jewel of the Nile" once.  Barely remember it.  As for an affair between Micheal & Kathleen....I once read (don't remember where) they couldn't stand working together.

Lori

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6 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I love "Romancing the Stone".  I saw "Jewel of the Nile" once.  Barely remember it.  As for an affair between Micheal & Kathleen....I once read (don't remember where) they couldn't stand working together.

I use "Jewel of the Nile" as a symbolic codeword for why most sequels to action comedies with a flirty lead couple don't work:
The first movie has to end with the couple together, and presumably marrying, so what's the "upped ante" producers can introduce in the second film?  They're having couple/MARRIAGE troubles, and might break up, if they don't end up together again by the end of this one!   How optimistic and life-affirming, for those who liked the first movie's relationship.  😐

The other is for them to have the additional character of a cute kid a few years after they settled down, and be an old-married-threesome family, like the characters in "The Mummy Returns" or "Legend of Zorro".  And presumably couldn't take the station wagon along on the adventure, in time for the kid to be the center of climactic jeopardy.  (And yeah, I'm still PO'ed about Pixar's "The Incredibles 2" being more of a movie about babysitting, than saving the world.)

The only other thing I remember about Jewel of the Nile was that it was coming in during a late-80's craze for "New vaudeville" performers fueled by Bill Irwin--Which is why the movie cast clown Avner the Eccentric as the main character of the new story, but also let rising wacky juggling group The Flying Karamazov Brothers do their bit part as the wild sword-tossing Arabs.  And even then, they were almost unrecognizable to anyone who hadn't seen them onstage or on cable:

 

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Black Legion (1937)

Still powerful social warning from Warner Brothers about white supremacist secret societies operating during the Depression.

Humphrey Bogart, in one of his first lead roles, play a bitter factory workman who, after losing a job promotion to a Pole, joins a secret society called the Black Legion, whose purpose is to "correct" the wrongs done to "real Americans" by foreigners. With a story clearly based upon the Ku Klux Klan (to whom reference is made in the screenplay) they strike with acts of terror at night against foreigners living in the community.

Bogart is highly effective in one of his best screen opportunities prior to becoming a star four years later. He is convincing in his early scenes as a happy family man, that happiness replaced by a bitterness prior to joining the organization. Later in the film Bogart will effectively convey fear and, in a particularly strong scene, he will openly weep in his wife's arms over what he has done with the secret society. I may be wrong but, off hand, I can't recall any other scene in Bogart's career in which the screen tough guy cried.

Bogart receives solid support from Erin O'Brien Moore as his wife. Dick Foran plays his factory friend who becomes concerned about the changes overcoming Bogart, while a young pre stardom Ann Sheridan plays Foran's girlfriend.

The most eerie scene in the film is set at night, with Bogart on his knees before a row of hooded black cloaked men swearing an oath of loyalty to their cause, a gun pointed at his head as he does so. This film still works, its relevance even greater today with FBI warnings about white supremacists being the greatest terrorist threat in America today. No one could ever have envisioned at the time this film was made, of course, that one day the President of the United States would give dog whistles of approval to these groups.

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3 out of 4

 

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17 hours ago, Curtis DeHaven said:

Big City Blues (1932) – With a runtime of 63 minutes and its lively comedic nature, it was a perfect choice for the evening.

Unholy Partners (1941) –  Robinson.  He’s not just that gangster; he’s done good work in serious dramas and comedies.  

The Firemen's Ball (1967) –  It's a fun comedy about a volunteer fire department throwing a party for a former boss - and all sorts of "stuff" just happens.

Well thank you. We've had some really great contributions of impressions of several really good films lately.

I love Big City Blues & love that last comment of yours for both that & Unholy Partners. And thanks for bringing my attention to FIREMAN'S BALL! Comedies are just the ticket right now. 

10 hours ago, TomJH said:

Black Legion (1937)

Great observation about that one Tom. I'm definitely going to revisit that. (then watch a comedy!)

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14 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I have to share my thoughts on THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO  SEVEN which I just watched on Netflix.

Thanks for sharing your personal story. I remember the Chicago Seven trial too. Finally gives me a reason to tune into yawnfest Netflix.

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11 hours ago, TomJH said:

Black Legion (1937)

Still powerful social warning from Warner Brothers about white supremacist secret societies operating during the Depression.

Humphrey Bogart, in one of his first lead roles, play a bitter factory workman who, after losing a job promotion to a Pole, joins a secret society called the Black Legion, whose purpose is to "correct" the wrongs done to "real Americans" by foreigners. With a story clearly based upon the Ku Klux Klan (to whom reference is made in the screenplay) they strike with acts of terror at night against foreigners living in the community.

Bogart is highly effective in one of his best screen opportunities prior to becoming a star four years later. He is convincing in his early scenes as a happy family man, that happiness replaced by a bitterness prior to joining the organization. Later in the film Bogart will effectively convey fear and, in a particularly strong scene, he will openly weep in his wife's arms over what he has done with the secret society. I may be wrong but, off hand, I can't recall any other scene in Bogart's career in which the screen tough guy cried.

Bogart receives solid support from Erin O'Brien Moore as his wife. Dick Foran plays his factory friend who becomes concerned about the changes overcoming Bogart, while a young pre stardom Ann Sheridan plays Foran's girlfriend.

The most eerie scene in the film is set at night, with Bogart on his knees before a row of hooded black cloaked men swearing an oath of loyalty to their cause, a gun pointed at his head as he does so. This film still works, its relevance even greater today with FBI warnings about white supremacists being the greatest terrorist threat in America today. No one could ever have envisioned at the time this film was made, of course, that one day the President of the United States would give dog whistles of approval to these groups.

a8c0e81ee41b3f99d7286ef4c0f41908.png

3 out of 4

 

I'd never heard of this film. Thanks for your post. I'll have to see if I can find it. It sounds really interesting and I'm a big Bogart fan.

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53 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'd never heard of this film. Thanks for your post. I'll have to see if I can find it. It sounds really interesting and I'm a big Bogart fan.

I think you'll be impressed by Bogie's performance. It had to be extremely frustrating for the actor that, after showing his acting chops in this film, as well as Dead End, also released in 1937, Warner Brothers continued to typecast him in supporting roles as mugs and gangsters for the next few years.

Black Legion occasionally comes on TCM. But, if you can't wait, can be found on DVD.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

[BODY HEAT] sort of jump started the second Golden Age of Neo Noir. See it!

I will at some point.

I deliberately try to leave certain MAJOR FILM TITLES unseen, even ones that interest me,  so I still have something to look forward to in life.

(Like unopened presents on December 26)

 

**I also still haven't seen BLADE RUNNER!

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31 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'd never heard of [black legion]. Thanks for your post. I'll have to see if I can find it. It sounds really interesting and I'm a big Bogart fan.

It shows on TCM quite a bit, epecially when BOGART has a Birthday or SUTS day.

It is EXTREMELY RELEVANT and BOGART invests himself in the part 100%.

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13 hours ago, EricJ said:

I use "Jewel of the Nile" as a symbolic codeword for why most sequels to action comedies with a flirty lead couple don't work:
The first movie has to end with the couple together, and presumably marrying, so what's the "upped ante" producers can introduce in the second film?  They're having couple/MARRIAGE troubles, and might break up, if they don't end up together again by the end of this one!   How optimistic and life-affirming, for those who liked the first movie's relationship.  😐

 

 

I think a successful sequel to ROMANCING THE STONE was not an impossible task- BUT I feel like it should SOMEHOW have been a REVERSAL of their parts in the first- MICHAEL DOUGLAS's character finding himself lost in a situation and KATHLEEN TURNER'S character having to play the rescuer...

I'm just not sure what kind of scenario would afford that...

EDIT: Maybe have EL GUAPO return as the MILITIA LEADER/HUGE JOAN WILDER FAN to ensnare her in Latin American intrigues...?

PS- I know some of you know who I mean by that.

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