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44 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

:D  

Never thought anyone who WASN'T Polish would have such an easily misstated name.  ;) (Benedict Cumbersnatch)

Sepiatone

I like to kid SNIGGLEBY BUNDERSNATCH. I don't know why.

He could buy and sell me 1,000 times over.

edit- he really was terrific on SHERLOCK too, very charismatic. (on the 3 or 4 episodes i saw)

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Last night I watched more of the first season of Death in Paradise.  I've watched subsequent seasons but haven't seen the first season.  Good theme music and it is relatively light.  If Friday is Horror Night on TCM, will probably find something else to watch.

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On 10/22/2020 at 1:24 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE DEVIL BAT, THE GHOUL (with Karloff), WHITE ZOMBIE and NIGHT OF TERROR (w/Lugosi) are all on PRIME.

The Devil Bat. "Just a little application on the tender part of your throat... AACK! 

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I've got a crummy copy of Crowhaven farm, a made for TV movie and I suppose that will have to do.  In the meantime the leaves are falling, making way for the upcoming snow...

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night I watched more of the first season of Death in Paradise.  I've watched subsequent seasons but haven't seen the first season.  Good theme music and it is relatively light.  If Friday is Horror Night on TCM, will probably find something else to watch.

Watched a couple of episodes of that a few years ago, but just couldn't get into it.  Should have as a I like tropical settings and British mysteries - or British like in this case.

Did watch the final episode of Decoy couple of nights ago.  Took about 3 years to watch all of it.  Only one season for 39 episodes, starring Beverly Garland.  Fairly interesting, mostly in a historic/nostalgic way for the 1950's type TV.  

At 9:00 on Friday nights you can find 800 words on UP TV, if you have access.  Interesting little Australian and New Zealand series.  Used to be on Acorn and season 3 still is, but UP purchased US rights to it I guess.

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46 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

The Devil Bat. "Just a little application on the tender part of your throat... AACK! 

i don't know why, but i just love that movie. i can watch it any time. it's public domain, so there are numerous prints- even color ones.

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Up In The Air (1940)

This is a quite pleasant little movie. Frankie Darro is a page at a radio station who dotes on a beautiful new employee but only causes problems for her. Mantan Moreland is at the top of his form as his buddy who helps his schemes even although he knows it means trouble. Included is their bumbling attempt at a humourous radio skit! 

The movie is a murder mystery but that aspect is kept so low-key that it is easy to ignore it.  

Some of the patter in the movie made me think it is what: His Girl Friday (1940) would be like if the screenwriters and performers were on Valium: all of the elements are there but they are not quite as sharp as they could be.

7/8

 

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On 10/19/2020 at 10:08 AM, TikiSoo said:

Last night I tuned into TCM at 8:08, catching PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED.

(Snip)...I found myself completely charmed by the end of this film, loving the fantasy aspect of looking back on your life choices...(snip)...

Of COURSE I thought the movie was "OK" as a teen but...(snip)...Much better & cuter than I remembered.

I was also a teen when I first saw Peggy Sue Got Married. Watched it again when it premiered on TCM about a month ago and, while I remembered really liking it, being older definitely gave me a deeper appreciation. The wistfulness of looking back on youth and roads not taken, the chance to be reunited with loved ones, and the understanding that some things in life are worth the disappointment and pains that may come with them...

All I had remembered of Nicholas Cage's performance was the clogged-nose voice but, this time around, I realized (or had I forgotten?) that there was more to it. It wasn't just Cage creating a character who had manic energy and exaggerated mannerisms. The character was, to a certain degree, putting on those affectations himself (both as a high-schooler and adult). For example, when Peggy meets him during his early morning walk with the family dog, he's actually quite subtle and thoughtful.

Although it seems Peggy's experience was intended to be seen as a dream or something like that, I did wonder about Michael Fitzsimmons including a dedication to her in his book.

Kathleen Turner really shines in this movie and I especially enjoyed the friendship Peggy struck up with brainy Richard and the part where she visits her grandparents. (Sidenote: I was once told of a prayer that would let one know when one would die. My great-aunts were not big on imagination but they did believe in superstitions so we have a number of family ghost stories.)

I liked Turner very much in Romancing the Stone as well and while Michael Douglas' character was a wildlife-trafficking rogue, he does say one of my dad's favorite movie lines. Now, my dad is not big on movies - he hates it when the Academy Awards is a category on Jeopardy! (We text each other our guesses during Final Jeopardy.) But he gets a kick out of "You're gonna need a bigger boat.", "Ride of the Valkyries" in Apocalypse Now, and when Michael Douglas says "D*mmit man, the Doobie Brothers broke up!" as he pages through an old Rolling Stone.

Edited to add: he also likes “the fall’ll probably kill you”.

Speaking of RS...

On 10/19/2020 at 10:08 AM, TikiSoo said:

I've never seen a Gilligan's Island episode, but I sure loved that clip!

Many years ago I read about the following in a magazine (I'm almost positive it was in RS, in the front section where they used to have a sort of round-up of news briefs and such) . A tour group's bus broke down and while waiting for help to arrive, the passengers entertained each other by singing songs from their respective countries. The French sang "La Marseillaise", the Germans sang a traditional drinking song, and the Americans sang the theme song from Gilligan's Island...because it was only song they all knew the words to. I don't know if this story is true or not but it does give me pause.

 

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(Small spoiler below)

Agatha Raisin (2014)
With my local library's audiobook section becoming more and more barren in recent years, I took a chance on a selection from this mystery series but didn't care for it. The tv adaptation had good reviews, however, some specifically mentioning that it was better than the book series. I've only watched the first episode of season one, "The Quiche of Death".

After running her own highly-successful London PR firm, Agatha Raisin follows her childhood dream of retiring early and moving to a picturesque country village in the Cotswolds. In an attempt to fit in with the locals, she enters a baking competition. Naturally, the competition judge ends up dead, poisoned, but was it an accident or murder? Aggie turns detective to find out what happened.

Though not an especially complex mystery, this was an enjoyable introduction to the characters and setting, with some typical English earthiness but also a slightly diverse cast so you know you're not watching Midsomer Murders (okay, I've only ever seen two episodes of that).

At one point, Aggie is on the phone with her former work mate, Roy, who along with his current boyfriend, Steve, had just visited her at her new house. Roy calls to warn her about something they noticed in a photo Steve took during their visit.

Aggie (on phone): "It's like the Witches of Eastwick here".

Roy (on phone):  "She looks like a witch, Aggie. She's really scary. They can be real nutters in the countryside."

Steve (to Roy): "Has she seen The Wicker Man?"

Roy (on phone): "Have you SEEN The Wicker Man?" 

Evidently, The Wicker Man is to a certain class of Brits what Deliverance is to some Americans. 
 

P.S. Aggie is played by Ashley Jensen, who I think is the same Ashley Jensen who narrates (in a slightly less husky voice) The Wonderful World of Puppies, which, if you've not seen it, is like Too Cute! but better.

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(Description of plot may include what some would consider spoilers)

Dreamchild (1985)  - Director: Gavin Millar, Writer: Dennis Potter, Cast: Coral Browne, Ian Holm, Peter Gallagher, Nicola Cowper, Amelia Shankley
In 1932 Columbia University invited Alice Liddell Hargreaves to its centenary celebration for Charles Dodgson. It was to the Liddell sisters that Dodgson - aka Lewis Carroll - first recounted the story that became Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. How much, or even whether, Hargreaves inspired the character of "Alice" is still debated but she has long been identified with her, at least in popular imagination.  A more controversial subject has been conjecture over the nature of Dodgson's feelings towards the child Alice Liddell. 

Part fictionalized period drama, part speculative psychological fantasy, Dreamchild shifts between Depression-era NYC, Victorian Oxford, England and Somewhere Else, exploring the complicated friendship between Alice and Dodgson and its lasting effect on her.  

Upon their arrival in the U.S., Hargreaves and her young aide, Lucy, are hounded by a waiting press which both mystifies and irritates Hargreaves. Jack, a reporter on hard times, disgraced and out of a job due to fabricating an interview with Lindbergh, sees an opportunity. He first charms the naive Lucy and then talks his way into a business relationship with Mrs. Hargreaves, arranging a number of commercial deals exploiting her association with the literary "Alice". (Among those mentioned - the Paramount Alice in Wonderland.)

Initially, Hargreaves comes across as a rather severe woman - formidably proper, demanding and disinclined to indulge others. She cautions Lucy not to mistake respectable Americans - meaning the upper class who travel to Europe - with the "great unwashed" they will encounter in NY. Still, a twinkle of humor emerges as she makes it clear that she's on to Jack's game but nevertheless is amused by his shameless cajoling.

Hargreaves struggles though with not only the public's expectations of who she is but also her own unease with the modern era.  Reality and illusion blur as her present day anxieties blend with childhood memories and she experiences waking dreams that seem to spring from repressed emotional trauma. In something of a mirror reversal of Carroll's poem at the end of Through the Looking Glass, it is the elderly Alice who is haunted by Dodgson and her own youthful innocence. Thoughts of impending mortality shake her, as does the idea of love - she confesses to always having been afraid of it. And the flashbacks to Oxford hint at possibly why.

The NY-set portions of the film are quite good in a 1980s miniseries way, with decent period detail for such a modestly-budgeted feature film. The Oxford scenes have a rather lush visual appeal but, mood-wise, become increasingly disquieting. Browne's affecting, nuanced performance as Hargreaves elevates the production and Shankley shows a keen intelligence in her role of young Alice. As Jack, Gallagher strikes the right balance between sincere and shady though his romance with Lucy is not entirely convincing.

There is something of an unnerving Overlook Hotel-like atmosphere when Hargreaves experiences the hallucinations in her suite. An apparition of Dodgson lurks in one of the rooms and the Caterpillar and Mad Tea Party make appearances as well. Created by Jim Henson's company, the Wonderland puppets are based on the famous book illustrations and, stylistically, are more like those in Labyrinth and The Storyteller than The Muppet Show's "Jabberwocky" number. They distort the already rather unsettling Tenniel designs into figures even more disturbing and menacing, expressing Hargreaves/Alice's aging, fear, regret and loss. 

Dreamchild implies that Dodgson was inappropriately drawn to the ten-year old Alice but, except for one particular scene, it's portrayed as a rather fumbling, pathetic infatuation - one he actually struggled against. Between that and the way Hargreaves eventually reconciles with her past, it's, well, off-putting is an understatement. This comment is based only on the film's premise of Dodgson's feelings. People may read more about the debate over that and have their own thoughts about what may be true or creditable.

When he filmed this movie, Ian Holm was almost 25 years older than Dodgson was at the time of the Oxford-set scenes. There is one point where he  briefly "becomes" Lewis Carroll and there is a very noticeable difference in his voice and demeanor than when he is Charles Dodgson.

 After watching this, I checked out seven different Alice productions, dating from 1933 to 1998.

 

Going to watch The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (1980) for Halloween.


 

  

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Yesterday I watched "Four's a Crowd" from 1938.  It was my first time seeing it.  I love Errol Flynn!  The film was great.  A really good romantic comedy.  I'd recommend it.

image.png.cb936db0415476de4ebc2066793e1eb3.png

Lori

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Blondie in the Dough Poster

Blondie In The Dough (1947) Movies! TV Network 4/10

Blondie decides to go into the cookie baking business.

A weaker late entry in the series, now at #21. Dagwood also takes a correspondence course in radio engineering. He is fired again by Mr Radcliffe when he louses up a deal with the owner of a radio station. Hugh Herbert appears as a scatterbrained head of a biscuit company which is also one of the sponsors of the radio station. Your enjoyment of the film may rest how funny you find the giggling Herbert, I was never a fan of his so I did not find this to be one of the better Blondie movies.

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16 hours ago, Calamity said:

(Description of plot may include what some would consider spoilers)

Dreamchild (1985)  - , Cast: Coral Browne,...in 1932 Columbia University invited Alice Liddell Hargreaves to its centenary celebration for Charles Dodgson. It was to the Liddell sisters that Dodgson - aka Lewis Carroll - first recounted the story that became Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. How much, or even whether, Hargreaves inspired the character of "Alice" is still debated but she has long been identified with her, at least in popular imagination.  A more controversial subject has been conjecture over the nature of Dodgson's feelings towards the child Alice Liddell. After watching this, I checked out seven different Alice productions, dating from 1933 to 1998.

 

 

 

various observations:

1. Thank you, this was a fascinating review.

2. I am intrigued by CORAL BROWNE, aka MRS. VINCENT PRICE #2. She is TERRIFIC in AUNTIE MAME, THEATRE OF BLOOD and THE RULING CLASS.

3. Is there any way you can use a largeR SIZED font when you post? i took the liberty of enlarging your quote, it looks like you're using 11 point font, and some of us are old and have to squint

4. a while ago, TCM showed the 1933 PARAMOUNT VERSION OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND and (as  i RECALL) the UNANIMOUS reaction on the messageboards was pretty much:

outragedviewer.jpg

(and rightly so. it is a TERRIFYING FILM)

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I remember the film and think I saw it years ago.

Last night, I watched (and fell asleep during) Children of a Lesser G-d (the dash is a Jewish thing).  Great movie and Marlee Matlin (who was about 21 at the time) definitely deserved the Oscar.  I always remember that Boomerang song.  I learned how to Braille a few years ago and I would love to learn ASL.  I remember the two stars on Broadway (John Rubenstein, son of Arthur and Phyllis Frelich (she played Grissom's Mom on CSI)).

 

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36 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I remember the film and think I saw it years ago.

Last night, I watched (and fell asleep during) Children of a Lesser G-d (the dash is a Jewish thing).  Great movie and Marlee Matlin (who was about 21 at the time) definitely deserved the Oscar.  I always remember that Boomerang song.  I learned how to Braille a few years ago and I would love to learn ASL.  I remember the two stars on Broadway (John Rubenstein, son of Arthur and Phyllis Frelich (she played Grissom's Mom on CSI)).

 

I taught myself some ASL several years ago.  I still remember most of it.

Lori

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2 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

Yesterday I watched "Four's a Crowd" from 1938.  It was my first time seeing it.  I love Errol Flynn!  The film was great.  A really good romantic comedy.  I'd recommend it.

image.png.cb936db0415476de4ebc2066793e1eb3.png

Lori

Yes,  a fine romantic comedy,  and another film with Flynn and DeHavilland but where DeHavilland ends up with Patric Knowles,  instead of Errol. 

(the other being The Charge of the Light Brigade).   

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

1. Thank you, this was a fascinating review.

4. a while ago, TCM showed the 1933 PARAMOUNT VERSION OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND and (as  i RECALL) the UNANIMOUS reaction on the messageboards was pretty much

(and rightly so. it is a TERRIFYING FILM)

For those who've sat through "Pennies From Heaven" and "The Singing Detective", Dennis Potter has basically made a career out of being the standard snooty British-deconstructionist trying to show England how he can make hamburger out of their optimistic, culturally hallowed sacred-cows, since that's the only way British satirists feel they can establish a personal sense of "identity" over their rigid culture, and "Was Alice insanity?"/"Was Carroll a pedophile?" is such low-hanging fruit, it frequently gets stepped on.  Actually, Charles Dodgson may have been unusually interested in the eldest teen daughter, and too shy to talk proposal, but feel free to speculate any motives from there.  

Also, in the Alice book, when the Mad Hatter and March Hare start making up a story--"Once there were three girls, whose names were Elsie, Lacie and Tillie, and they lived in a well"--there's a famous historic well that's a favorite picnic spot along the Oxford's river, and the three names happened to be the girls' nicknames (guess which one was "Lacie").  We're basically seeing a fourth-wall glimpse at how Carroll improvised his picnic stories,  and there's not a lot of psychiatry to delve from there.

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Mozambique (1964)

Yet another cheapie action potboiler with an exotic setting, Mozambique stars Steve Cochran as a down-and-out pilot with employment problems following an accident who is given a one way ticket from Lisbon to the title city to report to a mystery character. There he finds himself attracted to a young blonde singer working in a bar, while getting himself mixed up with drug smuggling and white slavery.

The plot isn't much, nor is the action too convincing. There will be a rescue from an Arab's semi palace with armed guards that will strain any semblance of credibility. Yet this little production is strangely watchable. Part of that is because this British German production was shot on location in Mozambique, bringing some atmosphere, as well as authenticity, to the film. The other is the sight of screen tough guy Steve Cochran in the lead role in what turned out to be his second last film (and the final one released prior to his bizarre death on a yacht off Guatemala, with three young women aboard - which actually sounds like a far more interesting story than the one we see on the screen here).

Hildegard Neff appears as the mysterious widow of the man who hires Cochran and gets to sing one song in German.  Martin Benson, a familiar character face even if his name may ring few bells of recognition, is easy to loathe as a scoundrel who seems to specialize in anything that's illegal.

MV5BOTQ5Mjg5NDAtNTQxZS00MWJjLThjMGYtZDg5

2 out of 4

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Genevieve (1953)

 

This is a simply wonderful bit of fluff! It is about a man who seems truly fond of his wife but is obsessed with his antique automobile. His long-suffering wife does her best to remain joyful, caring and dutiful despite her husband's affliction. Their mutual best friend considers the man a hopeless git and still carries a torch for the wife. The fact that they all remain terribly British come what may makes it all that much more charming.

The action revolves around the annual commemorative run between London and Bristol. The husband is bursting with exuberance. The wife puts on a brave face while her boredom is broken only by silly mishaps all caused by his ineptness. The friend's: "life should be a party" attitude is boundless except when confronted by minor inconveniences or petty annoyances.

I believe the movie benefits greatly from the actors' looking their parts. John Gregson's boyish charm and innocent face justifies his wife's affection and tolerance. Dinah Sheridan's simple beauty explains why two men are after her. Kenneth More carries himself perfectly as the good-natured bloke who is a bit of a bully at heart. Kay Kendall as the friend's traveling companion personifies elegant sophistication slumming with hooligans.

I wish I could say that the classic automobiles had their own personality but the simple truth is that they were there only to discomfort the characters and cause frustration by frequent break-downs. The wife's hat is much more endearing.

My only true quibble with the movie is how quickly the wife goes from justified anger to intense need for physical affection so quickly upon her finding a simple gift which he bought for her.

5.8/6.1317

 

 

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Assignment to Kill (1968) – A detective (Patrick O’Neal) is hired by an insurance agency to investigate several questionable incidents involving ships “accidentally” sinking.  I enjoy detective films – anything Marlowe.  Though, this was far from Marlowe, it was still ok.  Yeah, just ok…  It had that smugness between the detective and the leading lady (Joan Hackett).  It also had the advisory (Herbert Lom) playing right on the heels of the detective during his investigation (see clip).  And then when they cross paths that same smugness ensues between them.   All the bits and pieces on their own seemed good.   Things seemed to go fast, though.  Too fast.  Not fast-paced, but more clunky-fast.  Like something was missing.  The film seemed to have all the right ingredients, but somehow the “glue” that holds it all together was off.  I dunno…  Maybe I’ve finally figured out what a poorly made film looks like.  Anyone else see it?

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