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tm32-poster5b.jpg?w=640Nothing INSPIRES TERROR quite like EXTRA NEAT CURSIVE, huh?

THE MUMMY (1933)

I have this on DVD, but it's an issue of the OLD, CRAPPY print before UNIVERSAL went back and restored most of their major monster titles (i mean REALLY cleaned up the soundtracks of noise and cleared the picture up astoundingly well and repaired damaged frames digitally.)

i was on a MUMMY FILM kick recently, and I popped the DVD (crappy print and all)  in, but could not make it through. Wooden. Stale. Dusty.

i caught the RESTORED VERSION on TCM this morning (nice surprise) and again, I will state that to properly judge a film, one should see it in as close to the condition it was in when it was released. It was A WHOLE DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE watching the film without the tinny sound and the echo, the dialogue delivery comes across a lot better and the performances liven up. without that OMINIPRESENT HISSING SOUND, you understand how eerie and unsettling the moments of DEAD SILENCE are (same for DRACULA.) and it's great to see the MARVELOUS (and very well-lit ) sets in such a clear picture- any time UNIVERSAL was willing to shell out some real dough in the making of a movie, it SHOULD be well preserved.

17266678%5D&call=url%5Bfile:product.chai

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

to properly judge a film, one should see it in as close to the condition it was in when it was released.

One has to wonder, though...  Was that "hissing" sound maybe part of the original release and perhaps later filtered out with more modern techniques during preservation?  In 1932 putting sound in films was still very immature.

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4 minutes ago, Curtis DeHaven said:

One has to wonder, though...  Was that "hissing" sound maybe part of the original release and perhaps later filtered out with more modern techniques during preservation?  In 1932 putting sound in films was still very immature.

I think the hissing on the soundtrack was due to aging- we have some people here who know a fair amount about what happens to movie soundtracks over time. they can explains the whys of it. also whether the soundtrack being in Mono had something to do with it.

not just horror movies, but most movies of the early 1930's that have not been restored have the "hisssssing" sound going on all the time.

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I too really liked THE MUMMY featuring Karloff.  I also thought the Hammer version with Lee and Cushing was well done too.  Conversely, the modern re-make and sequels  with Brendan Fraser were just OK.  The film makers of these newer versions seemed more interested in impressing the audience with special effects than making them frightened.  

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3 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I too really liked THE MUMMY featuring Karloff.  I also thought the Hammer version with Lee and Cushing was well done too.  Conversely, the modern re-make and sequels  with Brendan Fraser were just OK.  The film makers of these newer versions seemed more interested in impressing the audience with special effects than making them frightened.  

The 1959(?) version of THE MUMMY is the first HAMMER FILM I ever saw, on TBS in the eighties. 
ive always enjoyed it 

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It was another fall asleep night.  Watched Blue Bloods where Erin's husband is actually seen on screen (Peter Hermann - Mr. Mariska H. in real life and also stars in laundry commercials and Younger) and then switched to IQ (Einstein as a matchmaker).  This is what I fell asleep during but I saw it before.  After that, it was watching the tail end and then beginning of The Devil Wears Prada (read the sequel to it for a library reading contest).  Thought Meryl Streep made a better fashion icon than Anna Wintour.  Coincidentally, there is an article in today's NY Times about the "white and thin is our motto" espoused by Wintour.  Tonight, have several options.  One question re: movies/tv shows... The review for the David Kelley show on HBO with Nicole K. and Hugh Grant got tepid reviews from the Times.  Horrible reviews for Rebecca movie (original is a classic) and mixed reviews for a remake of The Witches (Anne Hathaway again).  I liked the original version (and know Roald Dahl didn't care for Jews) with Angelica Huston as the main witch.  So here is the question:  do movie reviews by critics matter to you?  Friends/family count also.

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On 10/24/2020 at 8:37 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

2. I am intrigued by CORAL BROWNE, aka MRS. VINCENT PRICE #2. She is TERRIFIC in AUNTIE MAME, THEATRE OF BLOOD and THE RULING CLASS.

 

 

Lorna, if you can ever find the BBC production of Shaw's play Mrs. Warren's Profession, probably from the 1970s, you'll have another reason to love Coral Browne. A very bright young woman (and, IIRC, an aspiring mathematician) learns that her mother, out of her life for many years, is a former prostitute. Coral Browne as Mrs. Warren and Penelope Wilton as her daughter are brilliant. I can't imagine a better production of the play. Robert Newton, who had just played the title role in Jesus of Nazareth, is by no means as strong-willed a character as either woman, which is what the play demands.

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How to Train Your Dragon (2010)

 

I like animation of all types and I have a very soft spot in my head heart for innocence. 

The animation is excellent! I love the color schemes and the action was very smooth and lifelike. This is the highest quality movie I have watched in many years.

I am sorry to say that the story was fine but the treatment was not to my taste. Many parts where Hiccup is dealing with his father are very heavy-handed and border on oppressive. Several sections seemed to drag on indeterminably while not advancing the story or character development at all. There is a surfeit of characters and so some are two-dimensional because there is not time to develop them beyond the first one or two adjectives in their description in the summary. 

It is a movie which I will recommend to people who will appreciate  the visual experience. I could never recommend it for children. I had an opportunity recently to purchase a used DVD at very low cost and this reminded me that it had long been on my list of movies to watch. I am happy now that I passed on it because I enjoyed it on some levels but I doubt I will wish to watch it again soon and do not need it cluttering up the shelf.

3/6

 

 

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I watched a couple of scenes from MARA MARU, which was playing on TCM this morning.

It's a programmer, clearly made after Warner Brothers had lost interest in Errol Flynn who was now in his declining years as a star. This is the closest that Flynn came to appearing in a film noir but the film has reams of dull talk in its slow first half as the plot about a treasure hunt starts to unfold.

Still, Flynn, always an underrated actor, has a fine moment towards the end when he slaps his faithful Filipino assistant across the face after the latter refuses to return a jewelled cross to him as the boy wants to return it to a church while Flynn just wants the cross for the money. In just a few seconds Flynn's face captures the anger, frustration and regret that his character feels by his act of violence against a friend. It's a reminder of what a good actor Errol Flynn could be when he tried and he had a well written scene.

Errol Flynn in his prime years, ten to fifteen years before Mara Maru was made, was one of the great glamour Hollywood stars of the time and, no one else, of course, was as convincing or delightful in a role involving costume attire. Flynn had a flair and light heartedness, along with the charm and outrageous good looks, that made those roles seem like so much fun for both him and the audience. But something obviously ate at the soul of this man who seemed on the surface to have so much going for him and he burned himself out far too quickly.

As an actor, with his understated style, combined with the charm, he always made it look so easy, and, as a result, critics tended to be dismissive of his talent. But when I watch Flynn in some roles, be it Robin Hood or Don Juan, General Custer or Gentleman Jim, I can't envision any other actor of any era being his equal in the same role. And yet, in reality, Flynn had few opportunities in his career to really show off his acting skills. Watching him perform, and later show flashes of his talent in a lesser effort like Mara Maru, I often feel a touch of sadness at his largely unrealized potential as an actor.

Mara-Maru-1952-Errol-Flynn-and-Ruth-Roma

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

Lorna, if you can ever find the BBC production of Shaw's play Mrs. Warren's Profession, probably from the 1970s, you'll have another reason to love Coral Browne.

theater9.jpg

CORAL BROWNE,

aka your father's new wife who INSISTS you call her "WICKED STEPMOTHER" right when you first meet "so as simply to save time, Darling. "

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Saw a large part of but not all of The Decks Ran Red today (before it disappears from on demand). It has its moments, but it was not quite as exciting as I thought it would be, unfortunately and there is very little of Dorothy Dandridge in it. At least James Mason is front and center to perk things up. I'll finish it up though.

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

I watched a couple of scenes from MARA MARU, which was playing on TCM this morning.

It's a programmer, clearly made after Warner Brothers had lost interest in Errol Flynn who was now in his declining years as a star. This is the closest that Flynn came to appearing in a film noir but the film has reams of dull talk in its slow first half as the plot about a treasure hunt starts to unfold.

Still, Flynn, always an underrated actor, has a fine moment towards the end when he slaps his faithful Filipino assistant across the face after the latter refuses to return a jewelled cross to him as the boy wants to return it to a church while Flynn just wants the cross for the money. In just a few seconds Flynn's face captures the anger, frustration and regret that his character feels by his act of violence against a friend. It's a reminder of what a good actor Errol Flynn could be when he tried and he had a well written scene.

Errol Flynn in his prime years, ten to fifteen years before Mara Maru was made, was one of the great glamour Hollywood stars of the time and, no one else, of course, was as convincing or delightful in a role involving costume attire. Flynn had a flair and light heartedness, along with the charm and outrageous good looks, that made those roles seem like so much fun for both him and the audience. But something obviously ate at the soul of this man who seemed on the surface to have so much going for him and he burned himself out far too quickly.

As an actor, with his understated style, combined with the charm, he always made it look so easy, and, as a result, critics tended to be dismissive of his talent. But when I watch Flynn in some roles, be it Robin Hood or Don Juan, General Custer or Gentleman Jim, I can't envision any other actor of any era being his equal in the same role. And yet, in reality, Flynn had few opportunities in his career to really show off his acting skills. Watching him perform, and later show flashes of his talent in a lesser effort like Mara Maru, I often feel a touch of sadness at his largely unrealized potential as an actor.

Mara-Maru-1952-Errol-Flynn-and-Ruth-Roma

I enjoy Mara Maru as well--even though, as I've said before the 1950s part of Flynn's career is bittersweet for me.  The types of roles he takes are interesting, but Flynn is a shadow of his former self.  It's hard to see him looking haggard and he seems more cynical than he did starting out in the mid-30s.  Of course, he had aged 15+ years by then, but Flynn seems like he aged 30.  The gleam in his eye is gone.  In spite of all that, he does retain a bit of his charm and panache, which is evident in both this film and The Sun Also Rises.  The one film of his in the 50s that I really dislike is Kim.  Even Flynn cannot make that film more entertaining for me.  The backstory about the production of that film is much more entertaining than the actual film. 

Flynn did appear in a film noir, Cry Wolf, in 1947 with Barbara Stanwyck. 

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I enjoy Mara Maru as well--even though, as I've said before the 1950s part of Flynn's career is bittersweet for me.  The types of roles he takes are interesting, but Flynn is a shadow of his former self.  It's hard to see him looking haggard and he seems more cynical than he did starting out in the mid-30s.  Of course, he had aged 15+ years by then, but Flynn seems like he aged 30.  The gleam in his eye is gone.  In spite of all that, he does retain a bit of his charm and panache, which is evident in both this film and The Sun Also RisesThe one film of his in the 50s that I really dislike is Kim.  Even Flynn cannot make that film more entertaining for me.  The backstory about the production of that film is much more entertaining than the actual film. 

Flynn did appear in a film noir, Cry Wolf, in 1947 with Barbara Stanwyck. 

I know about 25 Errol Flynn films (including "Cruise of the Zaca") and would rate "Kim" as the worst he ever did.

Lori

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5 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

I know about 25 Errol Flynn films (including "Cruise of the Zaca") and would rate "Kim" as the worst he ever did.

Lori

I see your Kim and raise you Another Dawn (1937) with Kay Francis.

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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I see your Kim and raise you Another Dawn (1937) with Kay Francis.

I don't know that one.

By the way, how'd you get the writing under your screen name?

Lori

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3 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

I don't know that one.

Lori

It's not good.  Flynn and Francis have the chemistry of oil and water.  Flynn's movie makeup is so overdone, he looks like a porcelain doll. Or his mustache is too groomed.  I don't know what it is, but there's something "off" about his appearance throughout much of the film. 

With that said, the next time it airs on TCM, check it out.  Don't let my opinion dissuade you.  You might enjoy it.   I don't like to tell people not to watch things.

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13 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I know about 25 Errol Flynn films (including "Cruise of the Zaca") and would rate "Kim" as the worst he ever did.

Lori

Flynn turned down an offer to make King Solomon's Mines, settling on Kim instead. That turned out to be a mistake inasmuch as Solomon would turn be one of the top two or three box office hits of 1950 and would have probably have lead the actor to receive better scripts than he would be offered. The thought of making Solomon on location in Africa didn't appeal to Errol, as opposed to working in more comfort in India. Flynn paid a career price for that decision, much to the delight of Stewart Granger (a Flynn fan, ironically) when he was then offered the lead role in Solomon.

When Granger later thanked Flynn for turning down the film, Errol responded, "Don't remind me."

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I watched DRACULA AD 1972.

This is my least favorite HAMMER MOVIE by a mile.

I am sure that there is some sort of backstory as to why the MAKE-UP BUDGET for this film was only twelve pence. I guess location filming in CHELSEA was pricey, as were LEE and CUSHING at this juncture, and maybe the band  STONEGROUND was surprisingly expensive to book... but seriously.

LEE does not wear a hairpiece as DRACULA and he looks like an accountant. A vampire is killed by "running water" in a shower and just...dies. No steaming or melting or scabs. Absolutely nothing about vampires outside of the teeth to suggest undeadliness- even for BRITISH PEOPLE they're not unnaturally pale.

I do however kind of enjoy the AGGRESSIVELY 1970'S SCORE, which sounds like the music that plays during a CORPORATE TRAINING VIDEO FOR WHAT LIES AHEAD FOR EMPLOYEES AND TEAM ASSOCIATES OF GEN-CORP IN 1972!

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Madhouse Poster

Madhouse (1974) TCM 6/10

A horror film star (Vincent Price) is suspected of murdering his young fiancée. He spends years in a mental institution and when released, more murders start occurring.

A good cast in this watchable 1970s AIP flick. This is probably the last decent horror film Price made. This also co stars Peter Cushing as a screenwriter and Robert Quarry (Count Yorga) as a producer. In the opening credits we there is "special participation by Boris Karloff and Basil Rathbone", even though both had been dead for several years by then. They are seen in other AIP film clips where they appeared with Price. Karloff is shown in The Raven (1963) and Rathbone in Tales Of Terror (1962).

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29 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched DRACULA AD 1972.

This is my least favorite HAMMER MOVIE by a mile.

Yes, having Dracula in "mod"1970s does not quite work. Dracula's young slave Johnny Alucard tells Van Helsing (Peter Cushing), "You better leave me alone, man!" For guys there is plenty of female eye candy with some of the sexiest Hammer babes (Stephanie Beacham, Marsha Hunt and Caroline Munro).

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1 minute ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Yes, having Dracula in "mod"1970s does not quite work. Dracula's young slave Johnny Alucard tells Van Helsing (Peter Cushing), "You better leave me alone, man!" For guys there is plenty of female eye candy with some of the sexiest Hammer babes (Stephanie Beacham, Marsha Hunt and Caroline Munro).

Caroline Munro is GORGEOUS! And she tells a funny story in a HAMMER DOCUMENTARY about rushing home from the set covered in fake blood and being stopped for speeding.

ironically, a lot of people cite the sequel to this THE SATANIC RITES OF DRACULA, as the worst HAMMER and it's not, it's actually kind of fun.

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50 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Caroline Munro is GORGEOUS! And she tells a funny story in a HAMMER DOCUMENTARY about rushing home from the set covered in fake blood and being stopped for speeding.

ironically, a lot of people cite the sequel to this THE SATANIC RITES OF DRACULA, as the worst HAMMER and it's not, it's actually kind of fun.

The Funkiest Hammer film - Dracula AD 1972 – Voices of East Anglia

How does Christopher Lee manage to look so disinterested?

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17 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Funkiest Hammer film - Dracula AD 1972 – Voices of East Anglia

How does Christopher Lee manage to look so disinterested?

when playing DRACULA, a PROPER HAIRPIECE makes a HUUUUGE DIFFERENCE. I am almost certain Lee wears hairpieces in the first four DRACULA movies, but he stopped wearing them after TASTE THE BLOOD OF DRACULA and it was a MISTAKE.

dracula-prince-of-darkness_lee.jpg?w=683 99% sure this is a hairpiece.

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