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Allergies and today's kids


Kid Dabb
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When I was growing up, I never heard of kids being so allergic to so many things. Maybe it's because I never really followed the news on tv or the local newspapers - I'm inclined to think this may be the reason - or maybe because hardly anyone's kids had food allergies so many years ago.

 

I'm always amazed each time I hear or read of a small child having a nearly fatal allergic reaction - and all the talk in the various media about peanuts, specifically, being a major allergy trigger. Everyone I ever knew, growing up, ate peanut butter & jelly sandwiches.. all the time. Why didn't any of us have peanut allergies in the 1950s - 1960s (or earlier years)?

 

Where did all these killer peanuts come from??!!

 

I just saw this on my local TV News - about a small boy who nearly died.. from "touching a door".


 

At the age of 17, I had an allergic reaction to "something" - as yet still unidentified. Emergency Room said it was most likely a reaction to 1. an insect bite, or 2. food.

 

After months of testing, which included thousands of minute skin injections with various food extracts, a cause could not be determined. That left "insect bite", but the reaction was exactly like a severe food allergy.. funny mouth-feeling, which escalated to twitching facial muscles - tics - and then spontaneous swelling of mouth and esophagus.

 

One shot of adrenaline in my derrière with a syringe needle (I'm not exaggerating here..) about 6-inches long (DAMN!) made it all better - could hardly walk for 4 or 5 hours. I was issued a prescription for a box-50 of syringes, and a bottle of adrenaline for self administered relief should the problem recur. Never did. I kept that stuff for almost 5 years before I discarded it.

 

I'm pretty sure I would not have self-administered the next shot. I'd have had to put the filled syringe between the bedroom door and the hinge-side frame, close the door on it to hold it in place, then drop trou, then back into it.. firmly.. while, somehow, pushing the plunger from the other side.. somehow. I'd have to build a Rube Goldberg device. No. Nope. Uh uh.

 

I saw a movie once where a guy did this with a knife to stab himself in the back so he could throw off the detective's investigation - may have been Columbo.. can't recall.

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MY thing is AUTISM.

 

I seem to recall not all that long ago one had to throw a HUGE blanket over SEVERAL huge communities to find maybe one or two kids who were AUTISTIC.  It seemed NObody you knew either knew, knew of, or SEEN anybody who was autistic, it was so rare and such an odd occurance.  Now, autism seems to be the new millenium's "new" ADD.

 

Leads me to wonder if too many kids are being misdiagnosed due to it being easier to deal with when you THINK you have a successful treatment for something "autism-like"?   Just sounds kinda fishy to me....

 

 

Sepiatone

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MY thing is AUTISM.

 

I seem to recall not all that long ago one had to throw a HUGE blanket over SEVERAL huge communities to find maybe one or two kids who were AUTISTIC.  It seemed NObody you knew either knew, knew of, or SEEN anybody who was autistic, it was so rare and such an odd occurance.  Now, autism seems to be the new millenium's "new" ADD.

 

Leads me to wonder if too many kids are being misdiagnosed due to it being easier to deal with when you THINK you have a successful treatment for something "autism-like"?   Just sounds kinda fishy to me....

 

 

Sepiatone

It's been a while since I've read up on that one. I seem to recall the consensus being many cases were misdiagnosed - by ignorance, or by choice on the part of the physician(s). By choice, I mean they prescribed treatment for what they knew it wasn't..  to avoid having to placate the family or individual.

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When I was growing up, I never heard of kids being so allergic to so many things. Maybe it's because I never really followed the news on tv or the local newspapers - I'm inclined to think this may be the reason - or maybe because hardly anyone's kids had food allergies so many years ago.
 

 

Maybe in the old days, young kids just up and died after eating a peanut, but maybe it never made the news.

 

We have so much more news today, on TV and the internet, and there is more air time and page space that can devote a lot of time and space to details of all kinds of deaths, alergies, etc.that we never heard about 40-70 years ago when we were kids.

 

I remember people dying and kids dying of some unknown illness and the doctors didn't even know what killed them. They just died. There wasn't a lot of extensive testing like there is today. A lot of deaths were just called "natural causes".

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Maybe in the old days, young kids just up and died after eating a peanut, but maybe it never made the news.

 

We have so much more news today, on TV and the internet, and there is more air time and page space that can devote a lot of time and space to details of all kinds of deaths, alergies, etc.that we never heard about 40-70 years ago when we were kids.

 

I remember people dying and kids dying of some unknown illness and the doctors didn't even know what killed them. They just died. There wasn't a lot of extensive testing like there is today. A lot of deaths were just called "natural causes".

I agree. Cases which did develop were non-news - which, today, is all the news.

 

With all due respect to the individuals involved, I really think your phrase, "..young kids just up and died after eating a peanut.." is humorous - to me. It just hit my funny bone that way.

:)

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I agree. Cases which did develop were non-news - which, today, is all the news.

 

With all due respect to the individuals involved, I really think your phrase, "..young kids just up and died after eating a peanut.." is humorous - to me. It just hit my funny bone that way.

:)

 

 

I remember as a kid, often hearing that so and so "died". If someone asked "what with" or "why", the answer was often, "They don't know. He was sick a few days, then he died."

 

I also remember as a kid, that some of the neighborhood kids had head lice. My parents told me not to play with them because I might get their head lice. Many poor parents rarely took their kids to a doctor to get rid of the head lice.

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I remember as a kid, often hearing that so and so "died". If someone asked "what with" or "why", the answer was often, "They don't know. He was sick a few days, then he died."

 

I also remember as a kid, that some of the neighborhood kids had head lice. My parents told me not to play with them because I might get their head lice. Many poor parents rarely took their kids to a doctor to get rid of the head lice.

Me too. I was always being told so-and-so "passed away" and got pretty much the same answers as you did. I'm just astounded at how many peanut allergies there are these days. Makes me wonder if there really is something in our water (or foods) which exacerbates minor intolerances (I'm not going to say that phrase again anytime soon).

 

And I always thought "cooties" was something everyone made up because little girls and boys just naturally hated each other and this justified them keeping their distance (I'm ad libbing here..). Now I know.. the little lice eggs are "nits" (hence, nit-wit and nit-pick), and were mischievously referred to as "cooties"... and you CAN catch them!

 

Run away!.. Run away!..

:)

34orp6d.jpg

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MY thing is AUTISM.

 

Well back in the dark ages of the 60's, I was labeled "autistic" which then meant any kid who exhibited gifted talents in some fields (boys-math/science and girls art/music) and woefully inept socially. I was kicked up a grade in school and given "special" teachers for awhile. Thankfully, I adjusted into mainstream classes and just graduated high school early.

I'm still working on my poor social skills.

 

I am forever amazed at the advances in medicine in my lifetime, but saddened by the abundance of "daily meds" administered to kids to resolve issues. 90% of my issues were resolved by simply recognising them, then working on them-sometimes with help from a therapist.

 

That said, the kids I see labeled "autistic" these days are much more severely emotionally handicapped than I was. And Aspberger kids are really tough nuts to crack. Back in the 60's they would have just been committed to "someplace" instead of integrated into society like they are now.

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Kid and Sep, yep, those are constant fascinations.  I like to blame the tabloid feeding-frenzy mentality for our perception of some increased quantities.  But in our neighborhood, we've raised 12 kids with daily contact with each other, all the neighbors, a dozen pets, a huge variety of bushes, flowers, gardens and 'always outdoors'.  I've thought that IF our society was now seriously weakened by an abundance of now-overly allergic kiddos, then our neighborhood must be some deserted island outpost, some sanctuary...

 

But that's not true.  Those kids are mostly school age now, and they bring over dozens of classmates a week, many on a daily basis.  No allergies there, no autism. 

 

We also have a small dairy farm and that's a weekend trip, often, and IF simple exposure to a plethora of environments IS a good idea ("kids need to play in mud more often!"), then I suppose a farm wiht llamas, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens & eggs, more dogs, more cats plus all the dairy cattle - I guess that helps as well. 

 

The most fascinating aspect is hearing visiting parents tell us, "My child doesn't like to eat ____" or "My child won't eat ____" and yet, there they are, in the company of their childhood friends, chomping away on ?? asparagus ?? cheese ?? brocolli ??  cauliflower ?? carrots - you name it. 

 

We've seen those parents act so amazed over their child "succumbing" to the peer pressure of their friends YET not realizing those kids probably "don't/won't eat" because they succumbed to the parents' peer pressure - degrading a dish before it's served, making faces at it, etc. Gee... it's no wonder kids won't eat certain things.

 

I confess I'm a big believer in young children having pets, though.  AND being outdoors.  AND having a lot of neighbors for constant companions. 

 

I wish a better less-allergen lifestyle would be guaranteed by such simple daily activities.  And I wish reading WITH children was the simple key to academic success, too.  And I do believe "fix the schools" is a nonsensical argument when "fix the homes" is the REAL issue. 

 

But why should tabloids, politicians and social leaders ever confront the truth?

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MY thing is AUTISM.

 

Well back in the dark ages of the 60's, I was labeled "autistic" which then meant any kid who exhibited gifted talents in some fields (boys-math/science and girls art/music) and woefully inept socially. I was kicked up a grade in school and given "special" teachers for awhile. Thankfully, I adjusted into mainstream classes and just graduated high school early.

I'm still working on my poor social skills.

 

I am forever amazed at the advances in medicine in my lifetime, but saddened by the abundance of "daily meds" administered to kids to resolve issues. 90% of my issues were resolved by simply recognising them, then working on them-sometimes with help from a therapist.

 

That said, the kids I see labeled "autistic" these days are much more severely emotionally handicapped than I was. And Aspberger kids are really tough nuts to crack. Back in the 60's they would have just been committed to "someplace" instead of integrated into society like they are now.

Here's some good info on Asperger's - Click HERE

 

I've always had difficulty picking up on visual clues in body language, and spoken clues in context. If you want me to do something for or with you, you're going to have to hit me over the head with it. Be very direct.

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 I'm just astounded at how many peanut allergies there are these days.

 

 

 

I wonder if you find out a certain bank teller has a peanut allergy, could you go up to her window with a peanut in your hand and demand all her money? Would that be against the law?

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That said, the kids I see labeled "autistic" these days are much more severely emotionally handicapped than I was. And Aspberger kids are really tough nuts to crack. Back in the 60's they would have just been committed to "someplace" instead of integrated into society like they are now.

 

I get angered when I think(since your mentioning of it) of just how many kids, for reasons that range from making it easier for some instructors or therapists, or more lucrative  for others to "misdiagnose" many of these kids, especially if many of them DON'T suffer from either, or any malady.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I wonder if you find out a certain bank teller has a peanut allergy, could you go up to her window with a peanut in your hand and demand all her money? Would that be against the law?

You jest (you must! you must!)

:)

In today's society, I'm quite sure that would be considered armed robbery.

 

When AIDS was making big splashes in the media some years back, the act of spitting, by someone infected with the virus, upon another person had been considered grounds for attempted murder. There was a small chance of transmission via any skin lesions.

 

If you show her the peanut - yes.

Indeed

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Me too. I was always being told so-and-so "passed away" and got pretty much the same answers as you did. I'm just astounded at how many peanut allergies there are these days. Makes me wonder if there really is something in our water (or foods) which exacerbates minor intolerances (I'm not going to say that phrase again anytime soon).

 

And I always thought "cooties" was something everyone made up because little girls and boys just naturally hated each other and this justified them keeping their distance (I'm ad libbing here..). Now I know.. the little lice eggs are "nits" (hence, nit-wit and nit-pick), and were mischievously referred to as "cooties"... and you CAN catch them!

 

Run away!.. Run away!..

:)

 

 

There's always the cooties shot that kids administered to one another in elementary school (or at least I remember it when I was in elementary school, 1989-1995).  Using your finger, you trace two circles and make two dots on the "infected" kid's arm, while saying "Circle, circle, dot, dot, now you got your c ootie shot." While saying the c ootie mantra, you trace the circles and make the dots at the corresponding points in the song.

 

Also in elementary school, at the beginning of the year, we had to line up in the gym to have our hair inspected for lice.  The nurses would use a tongue depressor (or maybe it was just a popsicle stick, I don't know) and look through your hair.   By middle school, we were no longer inspected for lice, but than began having our spines looked at to see if we were developing scoliosis. 

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We also have a small dairy farm and that's a weekend trip

 

OK I've always wanted to ask this.....

 

When I had a farm, I would milk the cow directly into a cup and drink it raw-delicious! (you gotta like warm milk though)

 

But I would NEVER put my mouth to a teat and suck. This seemed gross. Why? It's exactly the same thing, isn't it?

But there obviously is an emotional barrier of suckling an animal, it's just skeezy weird.

 

And I agree 100% with the idea that many kids today are over-protected. I like seeing kids fall or get dirty and lo & behold-survive!

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http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/09/monsanto-roundup-herbicide.aspx

 

Lets not forget about fluoride and GMO crops, the ones with the built in pesticide. And people wonder why the honey bee is on the decline!

              It appears we, and many other organisms as a species, are being sold down the

                                    proverbial drain to line pockets with money.

                                                  Do I smell Soylent..?

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              It appears we, and many other organisms as a species, are being sold down the

                                    proverbial drain to line pockets with money.

                                                  Do I smell Soylent..?

 

What you smell is evil incarnate.

 

bilderberg.jpg

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