Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

Gilda (1946)

Recommended Posts

tumblr_mgb6mpBBhB1r0rezxo1_1280.jpg

 

I'm watching this movie right now.  I love this movie, it never gets old.

 

Rita Hayworth is so gorgeous in this film.  While she's pretty in color films, she's a knockout in black and white.   Glenn Ford doesn't seem to have many fans on this board, but I think he and Hayworth make a great pair in this film.  Columbia and audiences must have liked them together too because they made many films together, but this one is their best, imo. 

 

I love Rita's costumes in this film.  Aside from the famous strapless gown she wears in her "Put the Blame on Mame" number toward the end of the film, I love the shiny, glittery striped dress she wears at the beginning of the film.  I also love her costume at the Carnival masquerade party.  

 

The story is engaging in both the film noir aspect and the Hayworth-Ford-George Macready love triangle.  I especially love Hayworth and Ford's love-hate relationship.

 

"...I hate you too Johnny.  I hate you so much, I think I'm going to die from it. Darling..."  Hayworth and Ford then share a passionate kiss.

 

I love the big nightclub that Macready and Ford run.  In fact, one thing I love about studio era films are all the swanky nightclubs that are present.  I wish I could visit one of these cool places.  Instead of the lame nightclubs nowadays, with lines, $20 covers, overpriced drinks (I suppose they could have been overpriced back then too) and bad techno music. 

 

I don't know why Gilda doesn't get more attention.  It is definitely one of the best noirs and the film that cemented Rita Hayworth's spot in the echelon of huge Hollywood stars.  In fact, TCM's entry for this film says that Gilda is unavailable on DVD... which is a funny thing since I'm currently watching it on DVD--a legit, Columbia issued DVD that I bought at Barnes and Noble.

 

Great film and it'll be airing on June 3 and June 19 as part of TCM's Summer of Darkness series.  I hope we'll be studying it in the online film noir class!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Gilda, Rita Hayworth was never lovelier.

It's sad that she had several struggles in her private life. You've all probably heard the famous Hayworth quote:

"Every man I ever knew fell in love with Gilda, and woke up with Rita Hayworth."  or something like that.

 

I agree with everything you said about the film, speedy.

However, once the third member of the triangle is gone (so they thihk)  and Gilda and Johnny marry, I find it both distressing and unrealistic that Johnny would continue to "hate" Gilda. the first time I saw how cruel he still was to her after Mundsen was (apparently) dead and they were married, I couldn't believe it. Why?

 

It felt like they just wanted to spin the movie out a little longer. Johnny's loyalty to Mundsen to the point that even in death he seems to prefer him to Gilda - in terms of his loyalty- is just perverse.

 

Of course, the good old bartender saves the day for the (happy?) couple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm watching this movie right now.  I love this movie, it never gets old.

 

Rita Hayworth is so gorgeous in this film.  While she's pretty in color films, she's a knockout in black and white.   Glenn Ford doesn't seem to have many fans on this board, but I think he and Hayworth make a great pair in this film.  Columbia and audiences must have liked them together too because they made many films together, but this one is their best, imo. 

 

 

I agree with you about GILDA.

It is a great movie that never gets old.

I'm not a Glenn Ford fan, but I do like him in GILDA. I also like him in DEAR HEART.

Probably liking Glenn Ford in those movie has more to do with liking Rita Hayworth and Geraldine Page, but if Ford was a bad actor it would not be possible to like him in these movies if though I like the work of his co-stars.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the theory that one film clip can be worth 1,000 words....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you about GILDA.

It is a great movie that never gets old.

I'm not a Glenn Ford fan, but I do like him in GILDA. I also like him in DEAR HEART.

Probably liking Glenn Ford in those movie has more to do with liking Rita Hayworth and Geraldine Page, but if Ford was a bad actor it would not be possible to like him in these movies if though I like the work of his co-stars.

Rita is so sexy in this film that her aura spreads to everyone else in the cast.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the theory that one film clip can be worth 1,000 words....

 

 

Great clip!

 

Who dubbed Rita Hayworth's singing for this song?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great clip!

 

Who dubbed Rita Hayworth's singing for this song?

According to imdb it was Anita Ellis.  They picked a really good person to dub Rita's voice, it sounded like it really could have been her singing.  Rita was also excellent at lip syncing.  Apparently Rita wanted to do her own singing in her films and Columbia even went as far as paying for voice lessons for her.  Harry Cohn, however, never thought Rita's voice was strong enough, so she was always dubbed.  Apparently Rita was very bitter about this for much of her career. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the theory that one film clip can be worth 1,000 words....

 

This was on the television set when Jane Fonda goes to visit her mother in Agnes of God.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Gilda, Rita Hayworth was never lovelier.

It's sad that she had several struggles in her private life. You've all probably heard the famous Hayworth quote:

"Every man I ever knew fell in love with Gilda, and woke up with Rita Hayworth."  or something like that.

 

I agree with everything you said about the film, speedy.

However, once the third member of the triangle is gone (so they thihk)  and Gilda and Johnny marry, I find it both distressing and unrealistic that Johnny would continue to "hate" Gilda. the first time I saw how cruel he still was to her after Mundsen was (apparently) dead and they were married, I couldn't believe it. Why?

 

It felt like they just wanted to spin the movie out a little longer. Johnny's loyalty to Mundsen to the point that even in death he seems to prefer him to Gilda - in terms of his loyalty- is just perverse.

 

Of course, the good old bartender saves the day for the (happy?) couple.

I love this movie and echo all the accolades heaped upon it.  I always thought that part of the motivation for Johnny to continue his punishment of Gilda was guilt, that he suspected that Munson had committed suicide because he caught his wife and Johnny in a passionate clinch (it was clear that he suspected something was up between them).  I do have one criticism, which would be damning in a less appealing film; the ending is so lame and unbelievable, so unfilm noir.  The scripwriters really let us down here.  By definition, the main characters are doomed to their cruel fates, and don't saunter off holding hands and singing kumbaya.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only seen GILDA once....I didn't like it at all. I found all the principle charactors unlikeable. Especially Gilda. I just didn't understand their motivations. I suppose it's worth seeing again.

 

I was lucky enough to see the famous strapless dress worn in the movie in a Hollywood costume exhibit. It was teeny tiny. I was amazed Hayworth was such a small woman-I'd guess 5'2" or 5' 3" and a size 3 or 5. Can you imagine her next to giant Orson Welles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only seen GILDA once....I didn't like it at all. I found all the principle charactors unlikeable. Especially Gilda. I just didn't understand their motivations. I suppose it's worth seeing again.

 

I was lucky enough to see the famous strapless dress worn in the movie in a Hollywood costume exhibit. It was teeny tiny. I was amazed Hayworth was such a small woman-I'd guess 5'2" or 5' 3" and a size 3 or 5. Can you imagine her next to giant Orson Welles?

 

I believe if you watch the movie again you will not change your POV about the principle characters because they are all unlikeable. To me the so called love story here is similar to that in Gone With the Wind;  the characters are unlikeable and the romance juvenile as well as the motivations behind the characters.     The difference here being that Gilda is a film noir so the character are dark by definition (as in darkly pathetic).     In GWTW the characters are mostly just silly (as in pathetically silly).     

 

The Glen Ford character doesn't get better with multiple viewings.  In fact he just get more annoying.    I do find myself having more sympathy for Gilda.    Like so many female character in studio-era films (like Scarlett),  many of her annoying actions are driven by the fact women lacked power and they had to attach themselves to men any way they could to gain some.

 

BTW:  I was planning on posting about the connection between these two films prior to  reading your post.    Really,  but didn't wish to make it look like I was beating to death how unromantic I find the GWTW romance like I did in that other thread.   But then I saw this post and,  well the door was opened!    :huh:          

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this movie and echo all the accolades heaped upon it.  I always thought that part of the motivation for Johnny to continue his punishment of Gilda was guilt, that he suspected that Munson had committed suicide because he caught his wife and Johnny in a passionate clinch (it was clear that he suspected something was up between them).  I do have one criticism, which would be damning in a less appealing film; the ending is so lame and unbelievable, so unfilm noir.  The scripwriters really let us down here.  By definition, the main characters are doomed to their cruel fates, and don't saunter off holding hands and singing kumbaya.

I agree with you about the ending.  It was a little too contrived.  Johnny and Gilda, despite having that passionate love/hate thing going on, I doubt would go on to have a healthy relationship.  I believe Johnny should have been arrested for his part in the tungsten cartel that he was heading.  Ballin was doomed to either be arrested for the death of one his German backers or to be killed since he was trying to kill Johnny and Gilda.  Ultimately, I think a more realistic ending would have been for Gilda to be left with nobody and she'd even go back to Montevideo and continue working (I doubt she'd stay in Buenos Aires) or move back to her home in The States. 

 

I can see how this film might not be for everyone, but I really liked it.  If Rita Hayworth hadn't of starred in this film, I don't know if I would have liked it as much.  Hayworth is what makes the film work. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you about the ending. It was a little too contrived. Johnny and Gilda, despite having that passionate love/hate thing going on, I doubt would go on to have a healthy relationship. I believe Johnny should have been arrested for his part in the tungsten cartel that he was heading. Ballin was doomed to either be arrested for the death of one his German backers or to be killed since he was trying to kill Johnny and Gilda. Ultimately, I think a more realistic ending would have been for Gilda to be left with nobody and she'd even go back to Montevideo and continue working (I doubt she'd stay in Buenos Aires) or move back to her home in The States.

 

I can see how this film might not be for everyone, but I really liked it. If Rita Hayworth hadn't of starred in this film, I don't know if I would have liked it as much. Hayworth is what makes the film work.

 

The ending may not be quite noirish enough for us now, but when GILDA was being filmed.in 1945, the traits of what we now know as Film Noir were just being established; certainly, it had yet.to be identified and labeled as such. GILDA was just another crime (melo)drama, as many films.we've given the noir label were then considered, and with Columbia's top star.featured, I guess the studio didn't want to make her unrelentingly bad.

 

Many years ago, I read an interesting small book called (or at least.was about) "Hollywood in the Forties". I believe it was a British book from the late 1960s. It did an overview of films by genre. I remember that it divided the "pure", "black" noirs, from other, less pure, "grey" films. There were others that were.considered more.melodramas than anything else. The difference would be the POV of the filmmaker, and if it was consistent to the end. GILDA was in the gray,.or.maybe not even that category. A very good, very enjoyable film nonetheless imho.

 

It would take Orson Welles'.deconstruction of his wife's GILDA image in THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI to give us a true noir. Of course, Harry Cohn was right from a commercial standpoint about not making Rita too evil;.that film.was a major flop.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ending may not be quite noirish enough for us now, but when GILDA was being filmed.in 1945, the traits of what we now know as Film Noir were just being established; certainly, it had yet.to be identified and labeled as such. GILDA was just another crime (melo)drama, as many films.we've given the noir label were then considered, and with Columbia's top star.featured, I guess the studio didn't want to make her unrelentingly bad.

 

Many years ago, I read an interesting small book called (or at least.was about) "Hollywood in the Forties". I believe it was a British book from the late 1960s. It did an overview of films by genre. I remember that it divided the "pure", "black" noirs, from other, less pure, "grey" films. There were others that were.considered more.melodramas than anything else. The difference would be the POV of the filmmaker, and if it was consistent to the end. GILDA was in the gray,.or.maybe not even that category. A very good, very enjoyable film nonetheless imho.

 

It would take Orson Welles'.deconstruction of his wife's GILDA image in THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI to give us a true noir. Of course, Harry Cohn was right from a commercial standpoint about not making Rita too evil;.that film.was a major flop.

Good points about the establishment of film noir.  Did film noir even exist when they first started being made in the 40s and 50s? Or was film noir a genre that was created after the fact and then the crime/drama films were re-classified and re-labeled as "film noir" ?

 

I agree that while Gilda has many noir elements, it could also be classified as a straight crime melodrama as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ending may not be quite noirish enough for us now, but when GILDA was being filmed.in 1945, the traits of what we now know as Film Noir were just being established; certainly, it had yet.to be identified and labeled as such. GILDA was just another crime (melo)drama, as many films.we've given the noir label were then considered, and with Columbia's top star.featured, I guess the studio didn't want to make her unrelentingly bad.

 

Many years ago, I read an interesting small book called (or at least.was about) "Hollywood in the Forties". I believe it was a British book from the late 1960s. It did an overview of films by genre. I remember that it divided the "pure", "black" noirs, from other, less pure, "grey" films. There were others that were.considered more.melodramas than anything else. The difference would be the POV of the filmmaker, and if it was consistent to the end. GILDA was in the gray,.or.maybe not even that category. A very good, very enjoyable film nonetheless imho.

 

It would take Orson Welles'.deconstruction of his wife's GILDA image in THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI to give us a true noir. Of course, Harry Cohn was right from a commercial standpoint about not making Rita too evil;.that film.was a major flop.

 

It was fairly common for films we call noir today, to have a romantic ending,  especially ones made in the 40s;   e.g.  The Big Sleep,   The Glass Key,  etc...      I assume the main reason was commercial value.    (it certainly was in the two examples I provided since in both cases the studio was trying to push the latest 'hot' film couple regardless of the actual storyline from the book).        

 

Note that even when the ending remains true to book (Out of the Past),   that doesn't prevent the studio from reteaming the actors in a film where the plot allows for a happy ending (The Big Steal, which is a very light "noir").   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good points about the establishment of film noir. Did film noir even exist when they first started being made in the 40s and 50s? Or was film noir a genre that was created after the fact and then the crime/drama films were re-classified and re-labeled as "film noir" ?

 

I agree that while Gilda has many noir elements, it could also be classified as a straight crime melodrama as well.

Your second point about Film Noir is the correct one; French critics noticed similarities in American films made.during and after.WW2 with certain common traits, and defined and labeled the genre. So-called crime dramas and others have since been shoehorned into the noir genre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I found interesting is that one of the TCM spotlight hosts used films noir as the plural rather than film noirs.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was fairly common for films we call noir today, to have a romantic ending,  especially ones made in the 40s;   e.g.  The Big Sleep,   The Glass Key,  etc...      I assume the main reason was commercial value.    (it certainly was in the two examples I provided since in both cases the studio was trying to push the latest 'hot' film couple regardless of the actual storyline from the book).        

 

Note that even when the ending remains true to book (Out of the Past),   that doesn't prevent the studio from reteaming the actors in a film where the plot allows for a happy ending (The Big Steal, which is a very light "noir").   

I believe it's assumed that film noir was created here in the US, but didn't it originate in the expressionist movement in Germany?

Has the definition of the term finally been settled?  It's a genre of its own? Merely a style?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I found interesting is that one of the TCM spotlight hosts used films noir as the plural rather than film noirs.

Actually, rhe correct.plural in French.would have to have the number meet......so "films noirs".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Rita Hayworth developed Alzheimer's disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Rita Hayworth developed Alzheimer's disease.

Such a sad development,.and now Omar.Shariff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The epitome of a beautiful and seductive woman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, rhe correct.plural in French.would have to have the number meet......so "films noirs".

 

Ah, yes, plural noun and plural adjective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a sad development,.and now Omar.Shariff.

And Bob Hoskins not long ago.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tumblr_mgb6mpBBhB1r0rezxo1_1280.jpg

 

 

 

 

The story is engaging in both the film noir aspect and the Hayworth-Ford-George Macready love triangle.  I especially love  

I love the big nightclub that Macready and Ford run.  In fact, one thing I love about studio era films are all the swanky nightclubs that are present.  I wish I could visit one of these cool places.  Instead of the lame nightclubs nowadays, with lines, $20 covers, overpriced drinks (I suppose they could have been overpriced back then too) and bad techno music. 

 

The swanky nightclubs are a dream, aren't they?  I wonder if they still exist in big cities--New York or Chicago maybe.  I'm forever in search such a place, little lamps on the tables, mysterious characters, everyone dressed to the nines, and yes, no techno music!  The closest I found was a restaurant/bar whose owner danced while making Bananas Foster on a special rolling cart.  The bartender fought with the French resistance and wore a white tuxedo and tennis shoes.  A combo played music of that era.  Alas, it closed several years ago.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...