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What Are The Popular Slangs Words That Have Never Gone Out of Fashion?


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Does literally qualify as slang or is it more of an inappropriate redundancy in a sentence? Don't mean to sound like I'm nit picking.

 

But, really, isn't this thread just awesome? ;)

 

Awesome answer, Tom.  You are literally correct. :)

 

Back on topic, how about all the slang words used for "jail"?  I'm sure movies of the 30s and 40s are littered with words like "the jug", "stir", "pokey", "the bighouse", "the clink" that are probably still used today...

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In the early 60's (up to about 68 or so) we'd often say "got a f*g?", or "toss me a f*g" or  "I gotta get some f*gs" - and like that. Cigarettes, ay.

 

Well, the term is still around but it's used for something else now.

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I don't know if there are more grifters out there now or if people are just

more aware of them than they were in more innocent times. Whatever

the reason, the word seems to be more popular than it was maybe

ten or twenty years ago.

 

I remember dig from the 1960s, so I find it a little hard to use it with a

straight face now. When I'm on another site and post music from the

1960s, I usually say something like I can dig it, man. I still use into

once in a while, as in I'm really into the Beatles. I think into came along

a little bit after dig as an expression of approval.

We replaced "cool" with "dig it" - pronounced as a single word. I have used it myself recently, and on more than a few occasions. No one seemed to take notice so I may continue; make it a habit again.

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I'd have to go with "cool".  Long used by jazz musicians in the '40's, it grew to be a permanent fixture in American lexicon.  I still hear it being used by the kids in my family who are STILL not middle school age.

 

"Fly" is one I've discussed here somewhere before.  While reading a book of the collected short stories of O.Henry, he wrote a story, which I forgot(regrettably) the title of.  Since none of the stories were published past the year 1911, it surprised me when in the story, which took place in an affluent Connecticutt neighborhood "garden party" for the rich kids(teens).  There was, according to Henry, the custom of having two rooms in the house set aside for the boys, in one, and the girls, in the other, for "freshening up", and in one part of the story, the guys are talking about some of the girls at the party.

 

One of the young men is looking in a mirror and combing his hair, when one of the girls pokes her head in, sees him combing his hair and asks, "What are YOU attempting there, Phillip?"  And the boy replies,

 

"Trying to look FLY."  :o

 

You mean, in turn of the century America, young WHITE guys were saying that?  NOT young latter 20th century African American kids, like most believe?

 

 

Sepiatone

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High is still around in relation to drugs or drink.

Apparently people still get as high as a kite.

 

Ladies' man once in a while, though I think player

has taken the place of ladies' man.

 

Sissy, along with the additions of wimp and ****.

I guess there might be some small distinction between

the two, but it likely doesn't matter all that much.

 

One of my personal favorites is gin mill. It's not heard all

that much, but I've always liked having the mental picture

of a mill that produces gin, and I don't even like gin all that

much. When my dad reminisces about his youth, he will

use the term as a place where his friends or relatives would

go. As far as I can figure, a gin mill was a step or two above

a dive.

 

(Wimp is okay, but w u s s is censored. Guess there is a

difference after all).

To me, a "player" is someone who really gets involved in the "scene". Synonym---a scenester.

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In college, a guy who today is commonly known as a dork was called a "lunch", as in, out to lunch.

 

Considering just WHAT the word "dork" IS slang for, I'm surprised that the autocensor didn't give it the "star" treatment!

 

I am, however, glad to see the slang term "p h a t" is mostly gone.  I thought it was dumb.

 

As you can't see how it's spelled when you HEAR it, I figured trouble might come about.

 

Imagine, a young man, sitting in his girlfriend's house, and her modeling the clothes she just bought.  Out she comes, new outfit on, and asks the enamored young man, "How do I look in my new clothes, honey?"

 

The young man, with love in his eyes, tells her, "Oh, baby,...you sure look p h a t!"

 

As you can't SEE how it's spelled when you HEAR it, the young lady will only hear that she looks FAT in her new clothes.

 

And, any guy who tells his girl she looks FAT in her clothing is gonna get it!

 

Or WORSE, he WON'T! :lol:

 

Odd, the autocensor, giving "dork" a pass, gave "p h a t" the "star treatment!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Considering just WHAT the word "dork" IS slang for, I'm surprised that the autocensor didn't give it the "star" treatment!

 

I am, however, glad to see the slang term "p h a t" is mostly gone.  I thought it was dumb.

 

As you can't see how it's spelled when you HEAR it, I figured trouble might come about.

 

Imagine, a young man, sitting in his girlfriend's house, and her modeling the clothes she just bought.  Out she comes, new outfit on, and asks the enamored young man, "How do I look in my new clothes, honey?"

 

The young man, with love in his eyes, tells her, "Oh, baby,...you sure look p h a t!"

 

As you can't SEE how it's spelled when you HEAR it, the young lady will only hear that she looks FAT in her new clothes.

 

And, any guy who tells his girl she looks FAT in her clothing is gonna get it!

 

Or WORSE, he WON'T! :lol:

 

Odd, the autocensor, giving "dork" a pass, gave "p h a t" the "star treatment!

 

 

Sepiatone

I have pull with the autocensor. If you had used it, he would have flagged it.

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And I guess DFG will find out once and for all this Fall if Tim Tebow IS "a player" now that he's signed with his Philadelphia Eagles, huh! ;)

 

(...and MY money's on Tebow will STILL turn out to be a much better "PRAYER" than he is a "player"!)

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HEY! And speakin' o' "Prayers"...

 

Does anyone ever use the words "Holy Rollers" or say "Bible Thumper" anymore???

 

Nah...probably not anymore, huh. Much too "politically incorrect" now days, huh!

 

LOL

 

(...I get in SO much trouble like this sometimes, ya know...eeh...probably end up in Hell anyway, huh!)

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And I guess DFG will find out once and for all this Fall if Tim Tebow IS "a player" now that he's signed with his Philadelphia Eagles, huh! ;)

 

(...and MY money's on Tebow will STILL turn out to be a much better "PRAYER" than he is a "player"!)

 

I doubt Tebow will even take a snap in a regular season game.  He is listed as the 4 or 5 starting QB (for a reason I might add),  but Kelly could use him for two point conversions.    

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A few of my favorites:  the cat's meow, 23 skidoo, hot diggity, jeepers creepers, fab, the bee's knees, boss, the living end, not on your tin type.  Golly gee, please don't tell me they've gone out of fashion.  ;)

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A few of my favorites:  the cat's meow, 23 skidoo, hot diggity, jeepers creepers, fab, the bee's knees, boss, the living end, not on your tin type.  Golly gee, please don't tell me they've gone out of fashion.  ;)

No. I hear them all the time - along with "Dressed to the nines"

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Actually, I noticed that Dargo used this slang expression in an earlier posting here - "drives me bananas."

 

There's also "drives me bonkers" (which is what I feel whenever someone screams how something is "awesome.")

 

Anyone, by chance, know the basis of these two expressions?

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One should be dressed to the nines if one is gonna paint the town red.

 

I occasionally look in on a website devoted to "Word and phrase origins", and nobody there could figure out how that phrase came about.  Some thought it meant that at one time, nine articles of clothing were required to be considered being dressed properly formal.  But others, researching fashion through history, couldn't pinpoint any era where this was true.  The most they could come up with was SEVEN.

 

Now, one old slang word, sort of, that's long puzzled me was "Jake".   As in, "That's JAKE."  Or, "Everything is JAKE", meaning pretty much the same as "cool" or some other positive endorsement.  My MOM used it all the way up to her death in 1999.  And I always wondered, "Jake"  WHO?  WHY Jake?  :wacko:

 

Sepiatone

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A few of my favorites:  the cat's meow, 23 skidoo, hot diggity, jeepers creepers, fab, the bee's knees, boss, the living end, not on your tin type.  Golly gee, please don't tell me they've gone out of fashion.  ;)

AS in, the"fab four"....I remember WFIL radio's "boss jocks".

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Well, this seems to be going in the opposite direction from the thread title, but..

 

There's an old phrase I usually hear in westerns where a person will say, "I got no truck with.."

 

Once I found out what it meant I began using it and, as usual, nobody knows what I'm talking about - but I keep doing it and explaining it afterward. It's a fun phrase.

 

In general, it means not having anything to do with (something or someone); having no connection; not involved with...

 

e.g., "I got no truck with him. He does what he likes". 

 

or.. , "I hold no truck.."

 

Amended

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I occasionally look in on a website devoted to "Word and phrase origins", and nobody there could figure out how that phrase came about.  Some thought it meant that at one time, nine articles of clothing were required to be considered being dressed properly formal.  But others, researching fashion through history, couldn't pinpoint any era where this was true.  The most they could come up with was SEVEN.

 

Now, one old slang word, sort of, that's long puzzled me was "Jake".   As in, "That's JAKE."  Or, "Everything is JAKE", meaning pretty much the same as "cool" or some other positive endorsement.  My MOM used it all the way up to her death in 1999.  And I always wondered, "Jake"  WHO?  WHY Jake?  :wacko:

 

Sepiatone

There doesn't seem to be a source for the phrase "dressed to the nines" or " the nines" as it relates to clothing. The general meaning is to be very dressed up.. All dressed up...

 

:lol:

All gussied up!

 

In the 60s, instead of "Jake", we used "copacetic". 

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"Look! I don't know you from Adam's off ox!"

11379121885_080be3b977_z.jpg

 

 

 

The cab driver here thinks his passenger is "bats".

bfi-00m-d58.jpg?itok=de5corP9

 

 

 

 

(...don't hear these much anymore, do we)

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In New England, "wick-ed" was slang for something they liked, then the goth kids started using it along with "twisted" and "sick", and when the Broadway abomination arrived, it became a rather dull phrase.

 

I know people who say "swell" and I say "Oh brother" and when seeing impending disaster whisper in falsetto, "mother". I also use the term "stinko" to describe my state on any given day. 

And Mr Teek works in a prison, so we use that terminology daily. Speed dial to his work number is labeled "BigHouse" on my phone.

 

Interesting story about "fly". I like origins of slang terms too. One of the reasons I like BALL OF FIRE and a lesser degree MY FAIR LADY so much.

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