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Salton Sea (CA) disappearing


ElCid
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According to an article in the Washington Post, the Salton Sea in California is disappearing.  There were probably more, but it was featured prominently in the 1957 Sci-Fi  movie The Monster That Challenged the World.

 

 

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According to an article in the Washington Post, the Salton Sea in California is disappearing.  There were probably more, but it was featured prominently in the 1957 Sci-Fi  movie The Monster That Challenged the World.

 

Yep, and there's also a short subject film that TCM runs every so often about small boat racing on that body of water...and which as you might know was actually accidentally created early in the 20th Century after an irrigation canal project with the original intent to supply a little more Colorado River water to the Imperial and Coachella valleys got "a little" out of control.

 

(...as a kid in the late-1950s, my family had an 16ft outboard-motor boat, and we used to water-ski on it)

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Yep, and there's also a short subject film that TCM runs every so often about small boat racing on that body of water...and which as you might know was actually accidentally created early in the 20th Century after an irrigation canal project with the original intent to supply a little more Colorado River water to the Imperial and Coachella valleys got "a little" out of control.

 

I believe all this depicted in this film

 

aQRUnpa.jpg

 

Some historical background:

 

When Harold Bell Wright left the pastoral ministry in late 1907 he established a farm near El Centro, in the Imperial Valley, the southeast corner of the state of California. Here Wright wrote The Winning of Barbara Worth, the best selling book of his career. It was also Harold Bell Wright's only historical novel, telling in great detail the story of the "reclamation" of the lower California desert. What is now Imperial County, California, was once the eastern part -- the "barren desert" part--of San Diego county. Much of Imperial County lies below sea level and below the mighty Colorado River, which divides Imperial County from Arizona. In 1901 pioneers cut an opening in the west bank of the Colorado River and began building canals through the sandy soil to carry water to the desert. In 1905 the main canal gate washed out and the entire Colorado river was diverted from the Gulf of Mexico to the dead-end basin of the Imperial Valley, now known as the Salton Sea. Many books have been written about the heroic efforts to turn that river back to its natural course. If the two-year effort had failed, as it very nearly did, the entire basin would today be under salty water. Harold Bell Wright arrived in the area very shortly after the river was restored to its original course and the valley was saved.

 

http://www.gchudleigh.com/barbara.htm

 

 

Has TCM ever shown Barbara Worth? IIRC the flood climax can be seen in an episode of Brownlow's Hollywood series

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Yep, and there's also a short subject film that TCM runs every so often about small boat racing on that body of water...and which as you might know was actually accidentally created early in the 20th Century after an irrigation canal project with the original intent to supply a little more Colorado River water to the Imperial and Coachella valleys got "a little" out of control.

 

(...as a kid in the late-1950s, my family had an 16ft outboard-motor boat, and we used to water-ski on it)

 

 

 

 I hadn't realized that, about the creation that is!  The water-skiing sounds like fun.

:)

 

Poor California.  People are really freaking out about the drought.  I think I got a dirty look from a fellow diner when I asked for water in a restaurant!

 

Whoops, sorry, I somehow double quoted Dargo.  Not that his comments aren't worthy of it!

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I hadn't realized that, about the creation that is!  The water-skiing sounds like fun. :)

 

Poor California.  People are really freaking out about the drought.  I think I got a dirty look from a fellow diner when I asked for water in a restaurant!

 

Well I have good news and bad news;   The odds of a wet fall \ winter next year are high but so is the odds of major flooding.

 

Texas just ended their major drought.    I'm sure some there are saying be careful what you wish for.

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Well I have good news and bad news;   The odds of a wet fall \ winter next year are high but so is the odds of major flooding.

 

Texas just ended their major drought.    I'm sure some there are saying be careful what you wish for.

If only the rain could be evenly distributed throughout the country.  Wet weather (an El Nino?) is most welcome, but comes with the usual danger of landslides.  

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About ten years ago, in the Tampa Bay regions, we had our own little drought going on. Many lakes were 4 or more feet below normal levels. Boats tied to docks were sitting on bottom while tethered to dock pillars 6 feet higher. Retention ponds were bone dry; full of weeds. It was several years before enough rainfall returned levels to a more useable volume.

 

We've still remained in an ongoing dry spell of sorts. Even surrounded by water on two sides, rainfall has been below desired levels. Heavy rains will saturate the ground, filling retention ponds to overflowing, but percolation occurs quickly lowering levels once again.

 

I recall some years back, around 1999 I believe, a friend living in southern Texas showed me some pics of a large lake which had receded nearly two miles from the developed shoreline. Nothing but a dried up mud field with stark visions of old, empty boat docks dotting the shorelines.

 

Even when hurricanes come through Florida one after the other, the benefits of massive rainfalls from these are short lived.

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