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The Boards Are Humming


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from "Urban Dictionary":

 

"**** retentive

A term used to refer to a person who feels a need to be in control of all aspects of his or her surroundings. Or, in other words, an **** retentive person "can't let go of ****." "

 

 

How does your post relate to my question about if this website is now available on a new app and this is why we are seeing new users and old threads popping out of nowhere with comments?

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Well Dargo, one must not generalize too much. Those apron springs, IMHO, are tied, not to jolly old England, but to dour old Scotland.

 

Well, when it comes to those things(the superfluous u, that is). I HOPE you know that THAT sort'a thing ACTUALLY originated in FRANCE...Normandy, to be specific.

 

And I always thought it rather 'ironic' that for as much as many Brits have always somewhat looked upon a French with a mild sense of disdain, and with the French often feeling the same way about the British, well, one would THINK that the Brits would have gotten rid of those needless ol' 'u's YEARS ago, and if ONLY for the reason to thumb their collective noses at those guys right across the channel from 'em.

 

(...YOU know...kind'a how that sage American lexicographer Noah Webster did back in the early 1800s  and when he wrote the first American dictionary PURPOSELY excluding those things, and in efforts to differentiate the American lexicon from the British!)

 

;)

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Well, when it comes to those things(the superfluous u, that is). I HOPE you know that THAT sort'a thing ACTUALLY originated in FRANCE...Normandy, to be specific.

 

(...and I always thought it rather 'ironic' that for as much as many Brits have always somewhat looked upon a French with a mild sense of disdain, and with the French often feeling the same way about the British, well, one would THINK that Brits would have gotten rid of those needless ol' 'u's YEARS ago, and if ONLY for the reason to thumb their collective noses at those guy right across the channel from 'em)

 

;)

You mean to unclog our noses in their general direction?

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Well, when it comes to those things(the superfluous u, that is). I HOPE you know that THAT sort'a thing ACTUALLY originated in FRANCE...Normandy, to be specific.

 

(...and I always thought it rather 'ironic' that for as much as many Brits have always somewhat looked upon a French with a mild sense of disdain, and with the French often feeling the same way about the British, well, one would THINK that Brits would have gotten rid of those needless ol' 'u's YEARS ago, and if ONLY for the reason to thumb their collective noses at those guy right across the channel from 'em)

 

;)

Yes Dargeaux old man, but Americans are not exactly guilt-free. Americans say "herb" the French way -- not pronouncing the "h."  The English say "herb," like "her" with a "b" at the end of it.  

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Yes Dargeaux old man, but Americans are not exactly guilt-free. Americans say "herb" the French way -- not pronouncing the "h."  The English say "herb," like "her" with a "b" at the end of it.  

 

Yeah, I know.

 

(...probably some Cockney dude started THAT over here, HUH!) ;)

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On the UK/France topic, anyone see Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares on BBC a few nights ago?  This is the version of the show where he is NOT in the US.  I was watching it, and two episodes in a row were in other European countries.  One in France and one in Spain.  Both restaurants were owned and operated by British ex-patriots, and tended to attract the British ex-pat crowd in each respective country, who longed for food from "back home" I suppose.  And this was being aired on BBC.  The show has a bit of an otherworldly vibe to say the least.

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Darg, with respect, I'm wondering if you're being just a little, er, retentive, about the whole "superfluous U" thing.

 

Naaaah...well I don't think so, anyway!

 

Nope, I've always just thought of this as sort'a my "quest" in ridding the world of this scourge, THAT'S all!

 

Saaaay, is THAT one o' those little suckers in that word "scourge" there? DANG those insidious little things are EVERYWHERE, aren't they?!!!

 

(...looks as if I've gotten even MORE work cut out for me than I first THOUGHT, huh!!!)

 

;)

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Naaaah...well I don't think so, anyway!

 

Nope, I've always just thought of this as sort'a my "quest" in ridding the world of this scourge, THAT'S all!

 

Saaaay, is THAT one o' those little suckers in that word "scourge" there? DANG those insidious little things are EVERYWHERE, aren't they?!!!

 

(...looks as if I've gotten even MORE work cut out for me than I first THOUGHT, huh!!!)

 

 

I think your chances of getting more of the world dumbed down are a lot better than ours are at keeping it educated as much as it is. I expect you'll win eventually.

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Dick van Dyke  ... the finest cockney ever portrayed on film.

 

LOL

 

Yeah, well, whaddaya want from a good ol' Danville Illinois boy, huh?!

 

(...and besides, I'll bet there's always been more than a few East End Londoners who've probably had a bone or two to pick with Audrey's version of their dialect in that movie about "raining in Spain" TOO, ya know!!!)

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Naaaah...well I don't think so, anyway!

 

Nope, I've always just thought of this as sort'a my "quest" in ridding the world of this scourge, THAT'S all!

 

Saaaay, is THAT one o' those little suckers in that word "scourge" there? DANG those insidious little things are EVERYWHERE, aren't they?!!!

 

(...looks as if I've gotten even MORE work cut out for me than I first THOUGHT, huh!!!)

 

;)

 

Why, you... I mean, U, UberYank, U. 

 

Take this:

 

UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU     HAH !

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LOL

 

Yeah, well, whaddaya want from a good ol' Danville Illinois boy, huh?!

 

(...and besides, I'll bet there's always been more than a few East End Londoners who've probably had a bone or two to pick with Audrey's version of their dialect in that movie about "raining in Spain" TOO, ya know!!!)

Man, you got to try to see Christian Slater in Churchill: The Hollywood Years.

Slater plays Churchill as an American G.I. who wins WWII single handedly.  It starts with him bringing the enigma machine into a Brit HQ.

There is a section of London where they call it the Cockney Irish.  An in joke on how American actors mangle the British accents.

And a very funny scene with Princess Elizabeth in her first day in the war room with its giant map with tiny figures representing troops and ships.  As Elizabeth stands with her yardstick someone says to her, "Oh just push them around and pretend you know what you're doing."

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Yes Dargeaux old man, but Americans are not exactly guilt-free. Americans say "herb" the French way -- not pronouncing the "h."  The English say "herb," like "her" with a "b" at the end of it.  

Dang; I thought I was an American.  Raised in South Carolina by parents from Louisiana.  We all said herb, pronouncing the h as in the name Herb.  Wife is from Tenn. and she pronounces it without the h.  Seem to recall TV shows where they referred to herb gardens and not erb gardens.

Of course, Southern Americans are closer to the English than the French in many ways.

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And a very funny scene with Princess Elizabeth in her first day in the war room with its giant map with tiny figures representing troops and ships.  As Elizabeth stands with her yardstick someone says to her, "Oh just push them around and pretend you know what you're doing."

Oh, that sounds like the Pentagon.

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Dang; I thought I was an American.  Raised in South Carolina by parents from Louisiana.  We all said herb, pronouncing the h as in the name Herb.  Wife is from Tenn. and she pronounces it without the h.  Seem to recall TV shows where they referred to herb gardens and not erb gardens.

Of course, Southern Americans are closer to the English than the French in many ways.

I've always pronounced the "h," as did my mother, who was born in Manhattan (as I was), but I think most of the country does not pronounce it.  Regarding your part of the world (I've had the pleasure to travel fairly extensive in Tennessee and Arkansas.  There is a connection to the UK, but I think more than most people think, it's not to the Puritans but to the Scots who came a little later. You can certainly hear it in the traditional music.

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....Of course, Southern Americans are closer to the English than the French in many ways.

 

Yep, very true Cid. In fact, all along the eastern coast, all the way from Maine and down to Georgia, the "soft R" pronunciation of that letter is also most prevalent among the locals, and which of course is a very British manner of pronouncing that letter.

 

I mean, walk into any pub in the U.K. and instead of asking for a glass of "WHOA-tah" ask for a glass of "WA-ter", and the server will instantly peg you as a mid-western or western state American.

 

(...well, THAT and the idea that nobody ever walks into a pub for glass of water, of course...especially with ice cubes!)

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Yep, very true Cid. In fact, all along the eastern coast, all the way from Maine and down to Georgia, the "soft R" pronunciation of that letter is most prevalent among the locals, and which of course is a very British manner of pronouncing that letter.

 

I mean, walk into any pub in the U.K. and instead of asking for a glass of "WHOA-tah" ask for a glass of "WA-ter", and the server will instantly peg you as a mid-western or western state American.

 

(...well, THAT and the idea that nobody ever walks into a pub for glass of water, of course)

Dargeaux, the British "R" is quite a varied beast.  Go to Penzance, in Cornwall, you'll hear a distinct "r" sound, as if they were out of a Thomas Hardy novel; go to John o' Groats, you'll hear a rolled "r." In London you probably won't hear the "r, but you'll find a whole slew of accents. You can't generalize about the UK anymore than you can about the U.S.

 

Check this out (also watch Poldark when it comes to us later this month):

 

 

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LOL

 

Yeah, Swithin ol' boy. I loved how our learned host in that little video ever so "subtly" suggests the idea that for someone to pronounce their "R"s in more the harder fashion makes then EITHER sound as if they're a "pirate" OR someone "not real bright"!

 

Uh-huh, and just as "Yours Truly" the native Californian here does!

 

LOL

 

(...did ya pick up on that too?) ;)

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