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Arcane phrases from the classic era


lydecker
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And speaking of "Dutch"...

 

Now there's a nickname you don't hear people having much anymore. Seems it used to be much more common than it is now days.

 

I mean, the last guy I remember hearing of with THAT nickname was a particular POTUS who almost to the day he died had unnaturally dark hair for his age.

 

(...yeah, yeah..."good genes"...riiiiiiiiiight) ;)

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And speaking of "Dutch"...

 

Now there's a nickname you don't hear people having much anymore. Seems it used to be much more common than it is now days.

 

I mean, the last guy I remember hearing of with THAT nickname was a particular POTUS who almost to the day he died had unnaturally dark hair for his age.

 

(...yeah, yeah..."good genes"...riiiiiiiiiight) ;)

I used to always get confused between Dutch Reagan and Dutch Schultz.

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Puzzled about the sarcasm of the previous post. "Deutsch" is the German word for "German". Their name for their country is "Deutschland". We Americans have a long history of confusing that word for our word "Dutch". For example, I think if you took a poll, you'd find a significant number of Americans who think the word is "Dutch Grammophone", when in fact, it's "Deutsch Grammophone", meaning German, not Dutch. I think the phrase "Dutch tilt" arose from a similar misunderstanding.

 

And yet NONE of this goes to clear up why being "in Dutch" means being in big trouble, or why "Dutch treat" means splitting the bill.

 

 

Sepiatone

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What are the origins of "Cheese it, the cops!"

 

Always loved that one.

What I've found: 
 
1. Lexicographer Eric Partridge (1894-1976) speculated that it may be a corruption of "cease".
 
2. In his Vocabulary of the Flash Language, author and former convict James Hardy Vaux (1782-?) defined "cheese it" as synonymous with stash it and stow it, all meaning to desist or leave off.
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How about "Jeez, it's the cops."

Allright. Ya talked me into it. Gimme a sec..

 

..here

 

What I've found: 
 
1. Lexicographer Eric Partridge (1894-1976) speculated that it may be a corruption of "jease".
 
2. In his Vocabulary of the Flash Language, author and former convict James Hardy Vaux (1782-?) defined "jeez it's" as synonymous with stashing and stowing small, orange biscuits.
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Allright. Ya talked me into it. Gimme a sec..

 

..here

 

What I've found: 
 
1. Lexicographer Eric Partridge (1894-1976) speculated that it may be a corruption of "jease".
 
2. In his Vocabulary of the Flash Language, author and former convict James Hardy Vaux (1782-?) defined "jeez it's" as synonymous with stashing and stowing small, orange biscuits.

 

 

:lol:  LOL

 

I think the last three posts in succession are the funniest thing I have read on here!

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And yet NONE of this goes to clear up why being "in Dutch" means being in big trouble, or why "Dutch treat" means splitting the bill.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Granted, "Dutch treat" is splitting the bill, but I have heard the expression "Dutch" being used just opposite to being in troble.

 

i.e. Are we "Dutch" now? meaning are we square, or even, or okay.

Also, is that Dutch? meaning is that good or okay, or fair, as a fair deal.

 

I've never heard the negative connotation that you imply, either on screen or in my life.

 

Do you remember where you heard it used that way?

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More:

 

 

Slap happy (dumb)
 
Save up to weigh myself (poor)
 
The Pave (the street-pavement)
 
The Artiste (dancer)
 
The Barn  (Dime A Dance Ballroom)
 
Belly Whopper - Kewpie (fat man)
 
Frayed Alley Cat - Back Yard Sable - (a cheap fur stole)
 
Coffee and a sinker (coffee and a doughnut)
 
 
Music Oriented
 
 
The Cats (musicians)
 
Front Man (lead singer-band leader)
 
Slush Pump (trombone)
 
Gob Stick (clarinet)
 
The Coffin (piano)
 
Mirrored Tops (disco balls)
 
 
 
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My favorite has got to be "I didn't want him to think I was high hatting him." "Hi-Hatting" being the operative arcane phrase. (Source:  The Thin Man) 

 

What's your favorite?

 

Lydecker

 

Dizzy

 

I'll be a monkey's uncle

 

Fit as a fiddle

 

Right as rain

 

Slick as a whistle

 

See ya' later alligator

 

-------------------------------------------------

 

Just in the past couple of decades....

 

super

 

groovy

 

far out.

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Just in the past couple of decades....

 

super

 

groovy

 

far out.

And rat fink was very popular.  If memory serves they even came up with plastic rat fink figures in the early sixties.

 

Greaser.

 

Odd ball.

 

hood - meaning teenage thug

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