Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Movies waiting to be made


Recommended Posts

Books, plays, historical events, or life stories that would seem to be suitable for filming.

 

Here's an incident that could be given the Titanic (pick a version)/Ship Of Fools/Voyage Of The Damned treatment:

 

 

The Awa Maru  was a Japanese ocean liner owned by Nippon Yusen Kaisha. 
 
In 1945 the Awa Maru was employed as a Red Cross relief ship, carrying vital supplies to American and Allied prisoners of war (POWs) in Japanese custody. Under the Relief for POWs agreement, she was supposed to be given safe passage by Allied forces, and Allied commanders issued orders to that effect.
 
Having delivered her supplies, Awa Maru took on several hundred stranded merchant marine officers, military personnel, diplomats and civilians at Singapore. In addition, there were stories that the ship carried treasure worth approximately US$5 billion: 40 metric tons of gold, 12 (or 2) metric tons of platinum (valued at about $58 million), and 150,000 carats (30 kg) of diamonds and other strategic materials. Less dramatic and more credible sources identify the likely cargo as nickel and rubber. The ship was observed in Singapore being loaded with a cargo of rice in sacks; however, that evening the docks were reportedly cleared and troops were brought in to first unload the rice and then re-load her with contraband.
 
Her voyage also corresponded with the last possible location of the fossil remains of Peking Man which were in Singapore at the time and were, on their own, priceless in value. There are various theories regarding the disappearance of a number of Peking Man fossils during World War II; one such theory is that the bones sank with the Awa Maru in 1945.
 
The ship departed Singapore on March 28, but on April 1 was intercepted late at night in the Taiwan Strait by the American submarine USS Queenfish (SS-393), which mistook her for a destroyer. The Awa Maru was sailing as a hospital ship under the protection of the Red Cross, and under the agreed rules, she disclosed to the Allies the route she would take back to Japan. Her original route was promulgated through a minefield, an apparent ruse to draw attackers into the mined area. The area was known as mined, and would have been avoided at any rate. Her final route avoided the mines.
 
The torpedoes of the Queenfish sank the ship. Only one of the 2,004 passengers and crew, Kantora Shimoda, survived. He was the captain's personal steward, and it was the third time in which he was the sole survivor of a torpedoed ship. The commanding officer of the Queenfish, Commander Charles Elliott Loughlin was ordered by Admiral Ernest King to an immediate general court-martial. As the Awa Maru sank "she was carrying a cargo of rubber, lead, tin, and sugar. Seventeen hundred merchant seamen and 80 first-class passengers, all survivors of ship sinkings, were being transported from Singapore to Japan.…[The] survivor said no Red Cross supplies were aboard, they having been previously unloaded."
 
Commander Loughlin was found guilty of negligence, and the U.S. Government offered, via neutral Switzerland to replace the Awa Maru with a similar ship. Japan demanded full indemnification.
 
On the very day of Japan's surrender, 14 August 1945, Foreign Minister Togo forwarded a message to the United States through Bern, Switzerland, demanding payment of 196,115,000 yen ($45 million) for the loss of 2,003 lives; 30,370,000 yen ($7.25 million) for the goods aboard the Awa Maru; and various other claims, for a total demand of 227,286,600 yen or approximately $52.5 million.…No gold bullion is mentioned in the message.
 
The Japanese bill was never paid, and in 1949 the matter was closed.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This would be the mother of all disaster movies--one man who survived 2 sea disasters--William Clark  (crew member)--swam away from Titanic (1912) and Empress of Ireland (1914) sinkings (E o I sank in ten minutes after ramming a ship head on in a fog--major loss of life--, almost 1200 out of just over 1400 people).

 

"Lucky" Tower (stoker)--swam away from 3 disasters;  Titanic, Empress of Ireland, and Lusitania (torpedoed 1915).

 

Lucky Dunn (crew member--swam away from four(?!!?) disasters--Titanic, Empress of Ireland, Florazon (torpedoed March 1915), and Lusitania (torpedoed April 1915).

 

Link:   http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/lucky-tower.html

 

link works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a similar discussion on this sort of thing once.

 

I suggested WINTERDANCE, a book by Gary Paulsen that chronicles his training for, and running his first Iditarod.

 

Also, KINFLICKS, by Lisa Alther, which follows one woman's struggle with attitude and identity crisis through the '50's, '60's and into the '70's.

 

DYNASTY by Robert S. Elegant which chronicles the life of Mary Osgood, who arrives in Hong Kong in 1900 and her life connected to the family of a wealthy Chinese "tycoon" of sorts through the ever bending shape of mainland China for the next 70 years,  Through Sun-Yat-Tzen, to Mao Tze Tung.  and the tycoon's family's involvement in all of it.

 

WINTERDANCE is the only TRUE story among them, but all would, in the right hands, make compelling movies( IMHO!)

 

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll valiantly try to keep this thread alive (valiant is the word for Kimble):

 

 

uXkU8Zx.jpg

 

 

Witold Pilecki (13 May 1901 – 25 May 1948) was a Polish soldier, a rittmeister of the Polish Cavalry during the Second Polish Republic, the founder of the Secret Polish Army (Tajna Armia Polska) resistance group in German-occupied Poland in November 1939, and a member of the underground Home Army (Armia Krajowa), which was formed in February 1942. As the author of Witold's Report, the first intelligence report on Auschwitz concentration camp, Pilecki enabled the Polish government-in-exile to convince the Allies that the Holocaust was taking place.
 
During World War II, he volunteered for a Polish resistance operation to get imprisoned in the Auschwitz death camp in order to gather intelligence and escape. While in the camp, Pilecki organized a resistance movement and as early as 1941, informed the Western Allies of Nazi Germany's Auschwitz atrocities. He escaped from the camp in 1943 after nearly 2 and a half years of imprisonment. Pilecki took part in the Warsaw Uprising in August 1944. He remained loyal to the London-based Polish government-in-exile and was executed in 1948 by the Stalinist secret police Urząd Bezpieczeństwa on charges of working for "foreign imperialism", thought to be a euphemism for MI6. Until 1989, information on his exploits and fate was suppressed by the Polish communist regime.
 
As a result of his deeds, he is considered as "one of the greatest wartime heroes". In the foreword to the book The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery[6] Michael Schudrich, the Chief Rabbi of Poland, wrote as follows: "When God created the human being, God had in mind that we should all be like Captain Witold Pilecki, of blessed memory." In the introduction to that book Norman Davies, a British historian, wrote: "If there was an Allied hero who deserved to be remembered and celebrated, this was a person with few peers". At the commemoration event of International Holocaust Remembrance Day held in the US Holocaust Memorial Museum on 27 January 2013 Ryszard Schnepf, the Polish Ambassador to the US, described Pilecki as a "diamond among Poland’s heroes" and "the highest example of Polish patriotism"

 

Apparently I'm not the only one who thinks this would make an interesting movie:

 

Gray Financial Ventures, LLC (a newly formed production company) announced plans to adapt Pilecki's life into a feature film, titled Operation Auschwitz. The project is currently being led by American producer, David Aaron Gray with Poland's Opus Film (producers of Ida, winner of the 2015 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film) co-producing  

 

 

Auschwitz concentration camp photos of Pilecki (1941)

 

WqqEsLH.jpg

 

 

Pilecki's show trial in 1948:

 

VIpxyY1.jpg

 

 

One of several memorials to Pilecki (after his execution -- in a twist worthy of Hollywood, he was killed by another Holocaust survivor, Staff Sergeant Piotr Śmietański -- he was buried secretly and his grave has never been located)

 

zNXypoP.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

All Thumbs: The Siskel and Ebert Story

 

This should be made as a comic biopic, chronicling their early rivalry at competing Chicago newspapers; their TV partnership, where each man realized he was becoming more dependent on the other for career advancement; and lastly, the friendship that evolved between them.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A sequel to 2003's Master and Commander with Russell Crowe as Captain Jack Aubrey, and Paul Bettany as his good friend, Dr. Stephen Maturin aboard the British frigate HMS Surprise.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are three books that I'd like to see adapted for film:

 

Midnight in Peking: How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Days of Old China, an incredible, true story with an amazing cast of characters. I read that it was going to be turned into a mini-series for British television, but that doesn't seem to have been done.

 

http://us.midnightinpeking.com

 

E.M. Forster wrote six novels, five of which have been turned into excellent films. My favorite (and Forster's favorite) of his novels is his second novel, The Longest Journey, the only one not to have been filmed. I think that would make a great film.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Longest_Journey_(novel)

 

I also think The Hill of Devi, Forster's autobiographical book about his time as Secretary to the Maharajah of Dewas, would make a great film.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hill_of_Devi

Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagine a sci fi movie in which a strain of bacteria got released by accident and EVERYTHING made of plastics/polymers start to dissolve.  This includes electrical wiring insulation, gas pipes, etc.

 

World gets set back into the stone age.

 

2368220.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not holding my breath but Orders to Kill based on the William Pepper book exposing the real plot to kill Martin Luther King, Jr. is in film development.

 

You may recall that William Pepper successfully represented Coretta Scott King in a civil trial that exonerated James Earl Ray in the MLK assassination and pinned the blame on forces within the U.S. government and the Memphis State Police.

 

Sorry Richard.  I know this could be controversial and I don't wish for this thread to be locked by any means!  But I would like to see this film.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a novel written by Issac Asimov "The Foundation Trilogy".  Consist of 3 parts, Foundation, Foundation and Empire and Second Foundation.

 

It's written in 1951 and was dedicated to his mother.

 

The-Foundation-Trilogy-pb.jpg

Edited by hamradio
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. has long been one of my favourite books.  i believe Jerry Garcia held the film right for years.

It would be a piece of cake to make this film today with the computerized special effects.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. has long been one of my favourite books.  i believe Jerry Garcia held the film right for years.

It would be a piece of cake to make this film today with the computerized special effects.

They would have to "rent a tent..."

Link to post
Share on other sites

They would have to "rent a tent..."

I always thought Charlton Heston would have made a good Winston Nile Rumfoord.  He was supposed to be impotent if memory serves.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dr. Feelgood

 

JENeouK.jpg

 

Max Jacobson (July 3, 1900 – December 1, 1979) was a German-born New York physician, nicknamed "Miracle Max" and "Dr. Feelgood", who administered amphetamines and other medications to several high profile clients, including President John F. Kennedy.

 

After fleeing Berlin in 1936, Jacobson set up an office on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, where he treated many famous individuals including Yul Brynner, Truman Capote, Maya Deren, Cecil B. DeMille, Marlene Dietrich, Eddie Fisher, Alan Jay Lerner, Mickey Mantle, Marilyn Monroe, Zero Mostel, Elvis Presley, Anthony Quinn, Nelson Rockefeller, and Tennessee Williams. Dubbed "Dr. Feelgood", Jacobson was known for his "miracle tissue regenerator" shots, which consisted of amphetamines, animal hormones, bone marrow, enzymes, human placenta, painkillers, steroids, and multivitamins.

 

John F. Kennedy first visited Jacobson in September 1960, shortly before the 1960 presidential election debates. Jacobson was part of the Presidential entourage at the Vienna summit in 1961, where he administered injections to combat severe back pain. Some of the potential side effects included hyperactivity, impaired judgment, nervousness, and wild mood swings. Kennedy, however, was untroubled by FDA reports on the contents of Jacobson’s injections and proclaimed: "I don’t care if it’s horse pi$$. It works." Jacobson was used for the most severe bouts of back pain. By May 1962, Jacobson had visited the White House to treat the President thirty-four times

 

 

I've read one chapter of a recent book on Jacobson, about actor Robert Cummings. I've always pictured Cummings as a conservative (in the cultural more than political sense), old-fashioned "square". What happened to him surprised me.

 

Cummings began receiving injections from Max Jacobson, the notorious "Dr. Feelgood", in 1954 during a trip to New York to star in the TV production of Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men. Rose and Cummings' friends Rosemary Clooney and José Ferrer recommended the doctor to Cummings, who was complaining of a lack of energy. While Jacobson insisted that his injections contained only "vitamins, sheep sp3rm and monkey gonads", they actually contained a substantial dose of methamphetamine. Cummings continued to use a mixture provided by Jacobson, eventually becoming a patient of Jacobson's son Thomas, who was based in Los Angeles, and later injecting himself.

 

The changes in Cummings' personality caused by the euphoria of the drug and subsequent depression damaged his career and led to an intervention by his friend, television host Art Linkletter. The intervention was not successful, and Cummings' drug abuse and subsequent career collapse were factors in his divorce from his third wife Mary, and his divorce from his fourth wife, Gina Fong. After Jacobson was forced out of business in the 1970s, Cummings developed his own drug connections based in the Bahamas. Suffering from Parkinson's Disease, he was forced to move into homes for indigent older actors in Hollywood.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. has long been one of my favourite books.  i believe Jerry Garcia held the film right for years.

It would be a piece of cake to make this film today with the computerized special effects.

 

I was thinking of that one, too! I'd love to see it filmed (just so long as it wasn't directed by Terry Gilliam, hah.) And so far as special effects are concerned, I'd hope to see some restraint. More often than not CGI looks tacky.

 

I'd like to see Cat's Cradle made into a movie, too. Another favorite. Vonnegut is tricky material, though. It's seems tough to stay faithful to the books at all. (I enjoyed Slaughterhouse-5, though, unfaithful as it was. I was hoping to see some Tralfamadorians.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think Walter Miller's A Canticle For Liebowitz has been made yet.

 

I know Philip Borsos spoke of wanting to make it one day.  Again, it would be so much easier to make today.

 

"It could easily be accomplished with a computer"

- Dr. Strangelove

Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a similar discussion on this sort of thing once.

 

I suggested WINTERDANCE, a book by Gary Paulsen that chronicles his training for, and running his first Iditarod.

 

Also, KINFLICKS, by Lisa Alther, which follows one woman's struggle with attitude and identity crisis through the '50's, '60's and into the '70's.

 

DYNASTY by Robert S. Elegant which chronicles the life of Mary Osgood, who arrives in Hong Kong in 1900 and her life connected to the family of a wealthy Chinese "tycoon" of sorts through the ever bending shape of mainland China for the next 70 years, Through Sun-Yat-Tzen, to Mao Tze Tung. and the tycoon's family's involvement in all of it.

 

WINTERDANCE is the only TRUE story among them, but all would, in the right hands, make compelling movies( IMHO!)

 

 

 

Sepiatone

And yet.....Molly Brown is thr one they named unsinkable.

 

EDIT: Oops, I meant to respond to the thread prior to this one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember as a kid in the late 70s reading that Paul Newman planned to film a movie of an openly gay track runner, in a relationship with his coach. Robby Benson was to be the runner. I don't remember the name of the source book, or don't know why it wasn't then made, but I saw something a couple of years back, where a couple of today's stars were planning to do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Books, plays, historical events, or life stories that would seem to be suitable for filming.

 

Here's an incident that could be given the Titanic (pick a version)/Ship Of Fools/Voyage Of The Damned treatment:

 

 

 

 

I knew Dr. Frank Whitmore, the late paleontologist at the Smithsonian Institution.  The crate that carried Peking Man was supposed to have been delivered to him.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll valiantly try to keep this thread alive (valiant is the word for Kimble):

 

 

uXkU8Zx.jpg

 

 

Don't know if you'll agree with what I'm thinking here Doc, but after reading your write-up of Mr. Pilecki here, all I could think of was what a shame David Lean isn't around anymore to film this great man's story.

 

(...guess it all depends upon your feelings about that film he made of a certain WWI British military officer, huh)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like true-crime movies, when done well - and some are terrific (like "In Cold Blood"). So here's the one I want to see: I want someone to finally do a good movie about the murder of Judge Chillingworth and his wife in South Florida in 1960. The story has everything for a great movie: horrible murders, lots of low-lifes, an evil judge, gambling and money and the Atlantic ocean and deathbed confessions.  Really a heck of a crime that is barely written or known about - and a great subject for a movie.

Here's a link to a good write-up of it:

http://historicpalmbeach.blog.palmbeachpost.com/2005/06/15/chillingworth-murders-our-crime-of-the-century/

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...