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new article on Shirley Booth


drednm
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Thanks for posting this article.

 

COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA was a movie that I'd wanted to see for awhile.

When it finally aired on TCM a couple of years ago, I was blown away by Shirley Booth's performance in that movie. 

It was another example where an actor seems to be a real person living in the fictional scripted world of a movie.

I had a similar reaction to seeing Anna Magnani in THE ROSE TATTOO.

Interstingly, both of those movies also featured Burt Lancaster.

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Thanks for posting this article.

 

COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA was a movie that I'd wanted to see for awhile.

When it finally aired on TCM a couple of years ago, I was blown away by Shirley Booth's performance in that movie. 

It was another example where an actor seems to be a real person living in the fictional scripted world of a movie.

I had similar reaction to seeing Anna Magnani in THE ROSE TATTOO.

Interstingly, bith of those movies also featured Burt Lancaster.

doan forget about that Shirley Booth film with Anthony Quinn. must be a real toughie for tcm to get a hold of. :)

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Hot Spell is around. I just watched it the other night. No idea if TCM has ever aired it. Shirley Booth is excellent again as the silly wife who's always talking about going back to some town when they were all happy. Anthony Quinn is a philandering husband, the "kids" are all grown and ready to leave. She'll be alone. So there's this "Trip to Bountiful" thing going on. Of course, you can't go home again. Amid the drama there's this very funny scene when breezy Eileen Heckart drops by and tries to jazz up Booth by teaching her to flirt by smoking cigarettes and drinking booze. Hysterical. The kids are played by Shirley MacLaine, Earl Holliman, Clint Kimbrough.

 

Maybe TCM can't get it because it was a Paramount release???

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Hot Spell is around. I just watched it the other night. No idea if TCM has ever aired it. Shirley Booth is excellent again as the silly wife who's always talking about going back to some town when they were all happy. Anthony Quinn is a philandering husband, the "kids" are all grown and ready to leave. She'll be alone. So there's this "Trip to Bountiful" thing going on. Of course, you can't go home again. Amid the drama there's this very funny scene when breezy Eileen Heckart drops by and tries to jazz up Booth by teaching her to flirt by smoking cigarettes and drinking booze. Hysterical. The kids are played by Shirley MacLaine, Earl Holliman, Clint Kimbrough.

 

Maybe TCM can't get it because it was a Paramount release???

I've written this before, but the last ten minutes of HOT SPELL are transcendent. She's sublime in those final scenes. It makes some of the earlier contrivances worth muddling through.

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I've written this before, but the last ten minutes of HOT SPELL are transcendent. She's sublime in those final scenes. It makes some of the earlier contrivances worth muddling through.

HAZEL, smoking and drinking? What would the Baxters say?

 

Don't much like Quinn, but it sounds like an interesting film.

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HAZEL, smoking and drinking? What would the Baxters say?

 

Don't much like Quinn, but it sounds like an interesting film.

Actually (spoiler alert) Quinn's character is written out before the last sequence, and I think that is why Booth is so good at the end. She gets to shine without Quinn squeezing her out of the spotlight. Sometimes Quinn's hamminess gets in the way of good storyline. But Booth saves this film in the last ten minutes. 

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Actually (spoiler alert) Quinn's character is written out before the last sequence, and I think that is why Booth is so good at the end. She gets to shine without Quinn squeezing her out of the spotlight. Sometimes Quinn's hamminess gets in the way of good storyline. But Booth saves this film in the last ten minutes. 

Even better.

 

Now to see it.

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In some ways, Booth's performance is better in Hot Spell than in Sheba because she gets to do a little comic relief with Heckart, and yes the ending is excellent. The character she plays may be a little more realistic, but she's great in both. What a pity she didn't come to films earlier.

 

 

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Shirley Booth had an amazing stage career and won three Tony Awards for Best Actress. She played the lead (Leona Samish)  in Arthur Laurents' play The Time of the Cuckoo but did not get to play the role on screen. The working class Brooklyn woman of the play was made more glamorous and prosperous, given the name of Jane Hudson, and played by Katharine Hepburn in the film version, which was called Summertime. The author was not pleased with the result.

 

It would have been interesting to see Ms. Booth play the role on screen, in the manner in which the character was originally created.

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Shirley Booth had an amazing stage career and won three Tony Awards for Best Actress. She played the lead (Leona Samish)  in Arthur Laurents' play The Time of the Cuckoo but did not get to play the role on screen. The working class Brooklyn woman of the play was made more glamorous and prosperous, given the name of Jane Hudson, and played by Katharine Hepburn in the film version, which was called Summertime. The author was not pleased with the result.

 

It would have been interesting to see Ms. Booth play the role on screen, in the manner in which the character was originally created.

 

I can never get into SUMMERTIME, but I think I would have liked seeing Shirley Booth in a movie version of the play as written by Arthur Laurents.

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Shirley Booth had an amazing stage career and won three Tony Awards for Best Actress. She played the lead (Leona Samish)  in Arthur Laurents' play The Time of the Cuckoo but did not get to play the role on screen. The working class Brooklyn woman of the play was made more glamorous and prosperous, given the name of Jane Hudson, and played by Katharine Hepburn in the film version, which was called Summertime. The author was not pleased with the result.

 

It would have been interesting to see Ms. Booth play the role on screen, in the manner in which the character was originally created.

 

Booth won two Tony Awards as best actress, for Come Back, Little Sheba and for The Time of the Cuckoo. Her first Tony award was for supporting actress in Goodbye, My Fancy.

 

In Summertime, Hepburn plays a secretary from Ohio (Akron?), so I'm not sure where you get "more glamorous and prosperous."

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The way some people feel about "Hot Spell", I feel about "About Mrs. Leslie" (1954). Her characterization showed such a quiet intelligence and such a supportive nature that she gave Robert Ryan the opportunity to meet her on that level, which he was more than able to do. The movie is a very touching but bittersweet lesson in how transcendent (to borrow TB 's word) even the most fleeting moments can be. (He's married, but that's not really a spoiler since it's established in the beginning.)

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In Summertime, Hepburn plays a secretary from Ohio (Akron?), so I'm not sure where you get "more glamorous and prosperous."

Just by being Hepburn instead of Booth made the character more glamorous. Booth's character (whom Laurents liked but found a bit too lovable as a character) was from a working class family in Brooklyn -- problems with money informed a lot about Leona Samish. The movie also sentimentalized the story more. (The play was also the basis for the musical Do I Hear a Waltz?)

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The way some people feel about "Hot Spell", I feel about "About Mrs. Leslie" (1954). Her characterization showed such a quiet intelligence and such a supportive nature that she gave Robert Ryan the opportunity to meet her on that level, which he was more than able to do. The movie is a very touching but bittersweet lesson in how transcendent (to borrow TB 's word) even the most fleeting moments can be. (He's married, but that's not really a spoiler since it's established in the beginning.)

Nice post Dougie.

 

Of the four features in which she starred for Hal Wallis, I rate ABOUT MRS. LESLIE as the best-- largely because the story is less stage bound than the others she made, and because with her earthy characterization Booth plays off Robert Ryan so well. 

 

In some ways, because the relationship between her character and the married businessman (played by Ryan) is depicted in such flattering terms, I am surprised it passed the production code.

 

The film has some good subplots involving the supporting characters who reside at her boarding house. 

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Hot Spell is around. I just watched it the other night. No idea if TCM has ever aired it. Shirley Booth is excellent again as the silly wife who's always talking about going back to some town when they were all happy. Anthony Quinn is a philandering husband, the "kids" are all grown and ready to leave. She'll be alone. So there's this "Trip to Bountiful" thing going on. Of course, you can't go home again. Amid the drama there's this very funny scene when breezy Eileen Heckart drops by and tries to jazz up Booth by teaching her to flirt by smoking cigarettes and drinking booze. Hysterical. The kids are played by Shirley MacLaine, Earl Holliman, Clint Kimbrough.

 

Maybe TCM can't get it because it was a Paramount release???

may I ask on what channel it was aired? :huh:

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What's the deal with MAIN STREET TO BROADWAY..? It has never aired on TCM and was made by MGM. In fact, it features Lionel Barrymore's last screen appearance.

 

Shirley Booth and a smattering of other Broadway stars have cameos as themselves. I'd love to see it.

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