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It would almost be better to say that, rather than call these films a genre call them a style/tool of film making used in certain film/plot sequences or for a films entirety that was used to convey claustrophobia, alienation, obsession, and events spiraling out of control, predominantly in Crime, Thriller, Horror and Suspense films (but also occasionally in other genres) that came to fruition in roughly the period of the last three decades of B&W film (though there are some color examples). 

 

Then you can say we have this Film Noir Style that can have two opposite poles one would be Films de la nuit, Films of the night, the opposite would be Films Soleil, films of the sun, those sun baked, filled with light Noirs, then all the rest would fit in the spectrum in between being various shades of grey or Films Gris. No? ;-) 

 

A few Examples:

 

Films de la nuit 

 

Armored Car Robbery 

The Asphalt Jungle 

The Big Combo 

Black Angel 

Crime Wave 

Criss Cross 

The Crooked Way 

Crossfire 

The Dark Corner 

Dead Reckoning 

Detour 

Double Indemnity 

Edge of Doom 

Fallen Angel 

He Walked By Night 

Killers Kiss 

The Killers 

The Killing 

Kiss Me Deadly 

The Narrow Margin 

Night And The City 

99 River Street 

The Phantom Lady 

Raw Deal 

Red Light 

Scarlett Street 

The Strange Lives of Martha Ivers 

Sudden Fear 

Storm Warming 

T Men 

The Set Up 

They Live By Night 

They Made me a Fugitive 

Touch Of Evil 

Where Danger Lives 

Where The Sidewalk Ends 

The Window 

 

Films Soleil (a lot of light in these comparatively to those above) 

 

Ace In The Hole 

The Hitch-Hicker 

High Sierra 

Gun Crazy 

Bad Day At Black Rock  (color)

Highway Dragnet 

Roadblock 

Inferno (color)

Desert Fury (color)

Niagara (color)

The Naked City 

Violent Saturday (color)

Nightfall 

The Lineup 

Suddenly 

Down Three Dark Streets 

The Breaking Point 

Cry Vengeance 

The Phenix City Story 

Jeopardy

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I should add Party Girl to the "Films de la nuit" as a "color" noir

and a "color" Films Gris Sightly Scarlet with cinematography by the great John Alton story by James M. Cain

 

So Joe what are your views on Women on the Run as it relates to noir style.  To me it really hit all the right notes in terms of visual style.   First the setting being San Francisco.  I like this city for noir even more so then NYC.   One key reason is all the hills.   So many great shots one can get showing people and cars going up and down hills as well the shots showing a much longer distance.  With NYC buildings create a much shorter 'window'  (but this does help with the 'I'm trapped' vibe).  

 

Maybe I'm reading into this but I get the feeling of someone struggling when I see them walking up a hill (well in Dark Passage this was clearly the case with Bogie after his surgery).    Hills and the backdrop of SF just add something extra.

 

WOTR had many other noir visuals but there was a balance so they didn't come off as being trite "conventional noir" type footage. 

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cool, different way to see the noirs. I always saw the films as film noir genre, but i would separate them into sub-types.

For me there are

Crime Noirs (i.e. Asphalt Jungle, The Killing)

Woman's Noirs (Mildred Pierce, Woman on the Run)

Oddball Noirs (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse, Decoy)

Detective Noirs (The Big Sleep, Maltese Falcon)

Love Story Noirs (Clash by Night, Laura)

Pure Noirs (Out of the Past, Too Late for Tears)

I guess in my own way I agree with you, because what makes film noir a different style from a mystery, comedy, drama, romance???

It's that certain mood, feel no matter what elements are in that make it that way.

Kinda like just because a western has heist or a love story in it, doesn't make it less of a western.

 

 

 

It would almost be better to say that, rather than call these films a genre call them a style/tool of film making used in certain film/plot sequences or for a films entirety that was used to convey claustrophobia, alienation, obsession, and events spiraling out of control, predominantly in Crime, Thriller, Horror and Suspense films (but also occasionally in other genres) that came to fruition in roughly the period of the last three decades of B&W film (though there are some color examples). 

 

Then you can say we have this Film Noir Style that can have two opposite poles one would be Films de la nuit, Films of the night, the opposite would be Films Soleil, films of the sun, those sun baked, filled with light Noirs, then all the rest would fit in the spectrum in between being various shades of grey or Films Gris. No? ;-) 

 

A few Examples:

 

Films de la nuit 

 

Armored Car Robbery 

The Asphalt Jungle 

The Big Combo 

Black Angel 

Crime Wave 

Criss Cross 

The Crooked Way 

Crossfire 

The Dark Corner 

Dead Reckoning 

Detour 

Double Indemnity 

Edge of Doom 

Fallen Angel 

He Walked By Night 

Killers Kiss 

The Killers 

The Killing 

Kiss Me Deadly 

The Narrow Margin 

Night And The City 

99 River Street 

The Phantom Lady 

Raw Deal 

Red Light 

Scarlett Street 

The Strange Lives of Martha Ivers 

Sudden Fear 

Storm Warming 

T Men 

The Set Up 

They Live By Night 

They Made me a Fugitive 

Touch Of Evil 

Where Danger Lives 

Where The Sidewalk Ends 

The Window 

 

Films Soleil (a lot of light in these comparatively to those above) 

 

Ace In The Hole 

The Hitch-Hicker 

High Sierra 

Gun Crazy 

Bad Day At Black Rock  (color)

Highway Dragnet 

Roadblock 

Inferno (color)

Desert Fury (color)

Niagara (color)

The Naked City 

Violent Saturday (color)

Nightfall 

The Lineup 

Suddenly 

Down Three Dark Streets 

The Breaking Point 

Cry Vengeance 

The Phenix City Story 

Jeopardy

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So Joe what are your views on Women on the Run as it relates to noir style.  To me it really hit all the right notes in terms of visual style.   First the setting being San Francisco.  I like this city for noir even more so then NYC.   One key reason is all the hills.   So many great shots one can get showing people and cars going up and down hills as well the shots showing a much longer distance.  With NYC buildings create a much shorter 'window'  (but this does help with the 'I'm trapped' vibe).  

 

Maybe I'm reading into this but I get the feeling of someone struggling when I see them walking up a hill (well in Dark Passage this was clearly the case with Bogie after his surgery).    Hills and the backdrop of SF just add something extra.

 

WOTR had many other noir visuals but there was a balance so they didn't come off as being trite "conventional noir" type footage. 

Woman On The Run does hit all the right notes, another to check out is The Crooked Way featuring LA and the cinematography of John Alton. NYC does it for me too though, neither San Francisco or LA has els or much in the way of subways

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cool, different way to see the noirs. I always saw the films as film noir genre, but i would separate them into sub-types.

For me there are

Crime Noirs (i.e. Asphalt Jungle, The Killing)

Woman's Noirs (Mildred Pierce, Woman on the Run)

Oddball Noirs (The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse, Decoy)

Detective Noirs (The Big Sleep, Maltese Falcon)

Love Story Noirs (Clash by Night, Laura)

Pure Noirs (Out of the Past, Too Late for Tears)

I guess in my own way I agree with you, because what makes film noir a different style from a mystery, comedy, drama, romance???

It's that certain mood, feel no matter what elements are in that make it that way.

Kinda like just because a western has heist or a love story in it, doesn't make it less of a western.

 

 

I agree, I would sort of add to those:

Historical Noirs (The Black Book, The Tall Target)

Westerns Noirs (Pursued, Blood On The Moon) 

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