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Woman on the Run, Good Friday Night Noir


TomJH
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TCM will be having its premiere (I believe) of Woman on the Run, Friday evening at 10:15 pm (EST). This 1950 film has long been available in public domain versions only. Here's hoping this version is restored.

 

This is a tough, effective noir effort, with Ann Sheridan in a search for her husband through the mean streets of Frisco (if memory serves me correctly) after he accidentally witnesses a gangland slaying.

 

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TCM will be having its premiere (I believe) of Woman on the Run, Friday evening at 10:15 pm (EST). This 1950 film has long been available in public domain versions only. Here's hoping this version is restored.

 

This is a tough, effective noir effort, with Ann Sheridan in a search for her husband thorough the mean streets of Frisco (if memory serves me correctly) after he accidentally witnesses a gangland slaying.

 

 

 

It is my understanding based on an article in the L.A. Times that this should be the restored version that UCLA has been showing in the So Cal area.    

 

This movie is my 'must see' of the month.    (hey,  many great noirs in the special noir series in June and July but I have seen all of them except this one).

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TCM will be having its premiere (I believe) of Woman on the Run, Friday evening at 10:15 pm (EST). This 1950 film has long been available in public domain versions only. Here's hoping this version is restored.

 

This is a tough, effective noir effort, with Ann Sheridan in a search for her husband thorough the mean streets of Frisco (if memory serves me correctly) after he accidentally witnesses a gangland slaying.

 

0d87cfba-2cd0-46f3-9022-bb39ad1f67cd_zps

Thanks for the reminder Tom. I too hope that this effective film is shown restored.

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It is my understanding based on an article in the L.A. Times that this should be the restored version that UCLA has been showing in the So Cal area.    

 

 

That's good to hear, James. I certainly hope that will be the case.

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Thanks for the reminder Tom. I too hope that this effective film is shown restored.

I had never heard of Woman on the Run when I first watched it a few years ago. I was pleasantly surprised at how good the film turned out to be.

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TCM will be having its premiere (I believe) of Woman on the Run, Friday evening at 10:15 pm (EST). This 1950 film has long been available in public domain versions only. Here's hoping this version is restored.

 

This is a tough, effective noir effort, with Ann Sheridan in a search for her husband thorough the mean streets of Frisco (if memory serves me correctly) after he accidentally witnesses a gangland slaying.

 

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Oh, this sounds good. Thanks for the reminder. I saw it on the sched and wasnt familiar with it. Will make sure I watch it now along with Nora Prentiss (which I've seen a number of times)........

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Thanks for the recommendation TomJH!

 

I've never heard of this noir.  I know we'll probably discuss it in the noir class.  I have this film (and all the others that are scheduled, except for the handful I own) set up to record on the DVR.  I loved Nora Prentiss.  I didn't realize that Nora Prentiss was classified as a noir, but the more that I think about it, I suppose it does have some noir elements.  I thought Ann Sheridan was excellent in Nora Prentiss and have no doubt that she'll be good in Woman on the Run as well.  She was a very versatile actress.  I've liked her performances in every one of her films that I've seen so far. 

 

I like Sheridan because while she was known as the "Oomph Girl" (which I have to agree with Sheridan, it's a terrible nickname and really undermines her talents as an actress), she was a strong and gorgeous woman.  I am drawn to the strong, brassy women of the 1940s-- Sheridan, Ida Lupino, Alexis Smith, Lauren Bacall, just to name a few.  I love their personalities and how they don't take crap from anyone, but at the same time, maintain an element of romance as well. 

 

Looking forward to seeing this film.  I'll probably watch this one first out of the billions that I've recorded.

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Thanks for the recommendation TomJH!

 

I've never heard of this noir.  I know we'll probably discuss it in the noir class.  I have this film (and all the others that are scheduled, except for the handful I own) set up to record on the DVR.  I loved Nora Prentiss.  I didn't realize that Nora Prentiss was classified as a noir, but the more that I think about it, I suppose it does have some noir elements.  I thought Ann Sheridan was excellent in Nora Prentiss and have no doubt that she'll be good in Woman on the Run as well.  She was a very versatile actress.  I've liked her performances in every one of her films that I've seen so far. 

 

I like Sheridan because while she was known as the "Oomph Girl" (which I have to agree with Sheridan, it's a terrible nickname and really undermines her talents as an actress), she was a strong and gorgeous woman.  I am drawn to the strong, brassy women of the 1940s-- Sheridan, Ida Lupino, Alexis Smith, Lauren Bacall, just to name a few.  I love their personalities and how they don't take crap from anyone, but at the same time, maintain an element of romance as well. 

 

Looking forward to seeing this film.  I'll probably watch this one first out of the billions that I've recorded.

Thanks, speedy. I think you'll probably like this film.

 

I like the Warners ladies, as well. Next Monday TCM is having a day long tribute to Alexis Smith.

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Oh, this sounds good. Thanks for the reminder. I saw it on the sched and wasnt familiar with it. Will make sure I watch it now along with Nora Prentiss (which I've seen a number of times)........

thanks, Tom

got it set to record :D

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TCM will be having its premiere (I believe) of Woman on the Run, Friday evening at 10:15 pm (EST). This 1950 film has long been available in public domain versions only. Here's hoping this version is restored.

 

This is a tough, effective noir effort, with Ann Sheridan in a search for her husband through the mean streets of Frisco (if memory serves me correctly) after he accidentally witnesses a gangland slaying.

 

0d87cfba-2cd0-46f3-9022-bb39ad1f67cd_zps

Thanks very much for the reminder, Tom.  One I've not seen and very much look forward to.

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Thanks very much for the reminder, Tom.  One I've not seen and very much look forward to.

This is one of a small handful of films made by Ann Sheridan after her contract expired at Warners. Woman on the Run is a little known film today but one you'll probably enjoy. Sheridan's tart delivery of dialogue and insolent manner is used to good effect (particularly in her scenes bantering with an investigating cop), even if she doesn't have any of the zingers here for which she is fondly recalled by many from her prime Warners years.

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Going to my niece's graduation this afternoon. Better set the DVR now, who knows if it'll be shown again anytime soon.

True, Arturo. One never knows what kind of license TCM gets for their films, especially a little known one such as Woman on the Run. I usually try to watch a film like this when it comes on (or, at least, record it), since you never know when the opportunity to do so will arise again.

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Yes, it was a beautifully restored print of Woman on the Run, the best the film has looked in years.

 

In the true tradition of film noir, the playground climax took on a nightmarish quality. As for the roller coaster ride on which Ann Sheridan was trapped, after suddenly realizing who the killer was, well I've been on a few rides like that myself that seemed to take forever.

 

I thought that Dennis O'Keefe, an actor who never really made much of an impression upon me, was quite good in this film, flippant and bantering in his early scenes, somewhat ominous later on, capturing the Jekyll/Hyde aspects of his decidedly noirish character quite well.

 

Of course, the on location photography in San Francisco was a major bonus to the production.

 

Did anyone recognize Joan Fulton as the drunk in the bar who had a few words in exchange with Sheridan? Fulton would later change her name to Joan Shawlee and be best known to movie buffs today for her role as Sweet Sue ("Beanstock!!!") in Some Like It Hot.

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Interesting that after Universal picked up this indy for release that Sheridan signed a three-picture deal with the studio.  Connection?

 

It was too bad they had to do the roller coaster footage in process.  Did you notice that the shot of Robert Keith after the gun shot was actually a still frame of Keith matted against a background of the roller coaster.  A curious insert if ever there was one.

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It was too bad they had to do the roller coaster footage in process.  Did you notice that the shot of Robert Keith after the gun shot was actually a still frame of Keith matted against a background of the roller coaster.  A curious insert if ever there was one.

Well, it was a modestly budgeted production so no real surprise that they used rear screen projection in the roller coaster ride sequence. I still thought it was an effectively shot sequence, anyway. When I see process work like this, unless it's really badly done, I try to ignore it, if possible, and just go along for the film ride (in this case, literally).

 

You've got a sharp eye to have spotted that matted image of Robert Keith in front of the roller coaster, Ray. That moment lasts three seconds, at the most. What is even more curious about the decision to insert that frozen image of Keith looking so impassive is that it occurs right after his character has fired a fatal gun shot.

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Fred, I've had TCM for ten years, and I have no memory of Woman on the Run having been on the channel during that period of time.

 

Thanks Tom. I just remembered that I saw this film on YouTube about 4 years ago. It must have been an old un-restored print, and I'm glad TCM is showing a newly restored print of the film. This is a very good fast-moving movie. The roller coaster ride at the end s a real roller coaster ride! Quite exciting.

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The roller coaster ride at the end s a real roller coaster ride! Quite exciting.

Fred, I guess you didn't notice Ray's comment about the process work used in the film for the roller coaster ride. Nevertheless, I agree with you that it is a well shot and edited sequence in spite of that fact.

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What is even more curious about the decision to insert that frozen image of Keith looking so impassive is that it occurs right after his character has fired a fatal gun shot.

 

It might have been a post-preview decision to clarify some perceived or expressed confusion about who fired the gun.

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Fred, I guess you didn't notice Ray's comment about the process work used in the film for the roller coaster ride.

 

My wording was a joke.... I meant it was an exciting ending, "like" a wild roller coaster ride! :)

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