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***Possible spoilers ahead***

 

Tonight's Frisco-based noir is fabulous.

 

Ann Sheridan twice-- in NORA PRENTISS and WOMAN ON THE RUN.

 

Bogart & Bacall's DARK PASSAGE.

 

And then Lawrence Tierney is BORN TO KILL with Claire Trevor.  I love Maltin's review for this title, don't you...?

 

Murderer Tierney marries insecure Long, but can't stay away from her divorced sister Trevor. Super- tough film noir is uncharacteristically mean- spirited for director Wise, but is well put together nonetheless. A cult item.

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***Possible spoilers ahead***

 

Tonight's Frisco-based noir is fabulous.

 

Ann Sheridan twice-- in NORA PRENTISS and WOMAN ON THE RUN.

 

Bogart & Bacall's DARK PASSAGE.

 

And then Lawrence Tierney is BORN TO KILL with Claire Trevor.  I love Maltin's review for this title, don't you...?

 

Murderer Tierney marries insecure Long, but can't stay away from her divorced sister Trevor. Super- tough film noir is uncharacteristically mean- spirited for director Wise, but is well put together nonetheless. A cult item.

Whoa............it's gonna be a long night.

 

Ever since seeing Tierney on Seinfeld and Reservoir Dogs, I have a new appreciation for grumpy recalcitrant misanthropes, one of which I am.  

 

I love LA and Frisco 1940s geography as much as I love that of NYC.

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Whoa............it's gonna be a long night.

 

Ever since seeing Tierney on Seinfeld and Reservoir Dogs, I have a new appreciation for grumpy recalcitrant misanthropes, one of which I am.  

 

I love LA and Frisco 1940s geography as much as I love that of NYC.

Long is the word for it. LOL

 

When I think of actors in their prime who look nothing like themselves in older age, Lawrence Tierney is at the top of the list. His whole look and demeanor hardened considerably-- he must have lived a rough life.

 

I love the L.A. geography on display in DOUBLE INDEMNITY and CRISS CROSS (I'm a sucker for scenes shot at Union Station). 

 

The on-location filming they used for DARK PASSAGE is very evoking of a certain atmosphere, too.

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Long is the word for it. LOL

 

When I think of actors in their prime who look nothing like themselves in older age, Lawrence Tierney is at the top of the list. His whole look and demeanor hardened considerably-- he must have lived a rough life.

 

I love the L.A. geography on display in DOUBLE INDEMNITY and CRISS CROSS (I'm a sucker for scenes shot at Union Station). 

 

The on-location filming they used for DARK PASSAGE is very evoking of a certain atmosphere, too.

(I'm a sucker for scenes shot at Union Station). 

 

Same here. Love it almost as much as the Empire State Building. The Twin Towers are too painful, I can't watch them anymore.

 

What is the building in LA, the courthouse, that is in so many movies? Another favorite of mine.

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(I'm a sucker for scenes shot at Union Station). 

 

Same here. Love it almost as much as the Empire State Building. The Twin Towers are too painful, I can't watch them anymore.

 

What is the building in LA, the courthouse, that is in so many movies? Another favorite of mine.

The Criminal Courts Building. Appears in a lot of L.A.-based TV series, too. I worked there, on the top floor, in my late 20s. I signed up with an employment agency one summer that sent me to work as an administrative assistant to one of the chief investigators in the investigations department. That was the most fun I ever had on a job-- everyone in that department was crazy (in a good way).

 

My boss gave me 90 minute lunches, encouraging me to sit in on trials so I could see how the investigators gave testimony. It was very educational. Every day I'd pick a different floor and see what trials were going on. I could (and should) write a book about it.

 

In the fall, I had to go back to my regular job...and I was offered the chance to stay on full-time with the investigations people. I should have accepted and quit my regular job. It's one of my regrets, because I think I would have been a lot happier. And I would have had a bestseller! LOL

 

Incidentally, the Criminal Courts Building is located not very far from Union Station.

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The Criminal Courts Building. Appears in a lot of L.A.-based TV series, too. I worked there, on the top floor, in my late 20s. I signed up with an employment agency one summer that sent me to work as an administrative assistant to one of the chief investigators in the investigations department. That was the most fun I ever had on a job-- everyone in that department was crazy (in a good way).

 

My boss gave me 90 minute lunches, encouraging me to sit in on trials so I could see how the investigators gave testimony. It was very educational. Every day I'd pick a different floor and see what trials were going on. I could (and should) write a book about it.

 

In the fall, I had to go back to my regular job...and I was offered the chance to stay on full-time with the investigations people. I should have accepted and quit my regular job. It's one of my regrets, because I think I would have been a lot happier. And I would have had a bestseller! LOL

 

Incidentally, the Criminal Courts Building is located not very far from Union Station.

That's the one!

 

Did you? How cool.

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I loved Eddie Muller's intro for NORA PRENTISS. This is my favorite Ann Sheridan film, and I like how he kept the focus on her, saying this is Sheridan's Mildred Pierce. Perfect.

 

Why can't Bob & Ben's intros be so good and so on target, like this...?

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I loved Eddie Muller's intro for NORA PRENTISS. This is my favorite Ann Sheridan film, and I like how he kept the focus on her, saying this is Sheridan's Mildred Pierce. Perfect.

 

Why can't Bob & Ben's intros be so good and so on target, like this...?

Wasn't he good?

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I loved Eddie Muller's intro for NORA PRENTISS. This is my favorite Ann Sheridan film, and I like how he kept the focus on her, saying this is Sheridan's Mildred Pierce. Perfect.

 

Why can't Bob & Ben's intros be so good and so on target, like this...?

Did I miss something? If there were finger prints on file for Robert Thompson, how weren't there finger prints on file for Richard Talbot?

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Did I miss something? If there were finger prints on file for Robert Thompson, how weren't there finger prints on file for Richard Talbot?

Yes, I wondered about that too...part of the plot where one has to suspend disbelief.

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***Possible spoilers ahead***

 

Tonight's Frisco-based noir is fabulous.

 

Ann Sheridan twice-- in NORA PRENTISS and WOMAN ON THE RUN.

 

Bogart & Bacall's DARK PASSAGE.

 

And then Lawrence Tierney is BORN TO KILL with Claire Trevor.  I love Maltin's review for this title, don't you...?

 

Murderer Tierney marries insecure Long, but can't stay away from her divorced sister Trevor. Super- tough film noir is uncharacteristically mean- spirited for director Wise, but is well put together nonetheless. A cult item.

First things first. TCM should hire Eddie. Pair him with Ben.

 

Wow. Now that's what I call TCM, like in the old days.

 

Except for me asking Ann: Dog? What dog? Dog? Did you remember you had a dog? Hello, lady? DOG? until she finally remembered she had it locked up all day, I was mesmerized. The pacing, the dialogue, spot on. 

 

The location shots? Gorgeous. As much a character in the movie as Ann.

 

The detective was the guy from the Twilight Zone who puts masks on his kids as he is dying, and they can't take them off, right?

 

Dark Passage? Always good to see. Still find it disconcerting that the hands in the beginning of the movie weren't Bogey's. Again, the location shots, loved them. Did I see the bell tower from Vertigo? Love the cable car turnaround near Florsheim. Poor Florsheim, they made it all the way into the late 1960s, and then garbage shoes put them out of business. Bogey and Baby - gorgeous together.

 

Still can't believe that was Tierney, no matter how many times I've seen Born to Kill. Didn't last, but I had seen it before, and it wasn't a pleasant picture, for sure.

 

Excellent lineup.

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First things first. TCM should hire Eddie. Pair him with Ben.

 

Wow. Now that's what I call TCM, like in the old days.

 

Except for me asking Ann: Dog? What dog? Dog? Did you remember you had a dog? Hello, lady? DOG? until she finally remembered she had it locked up all day, I was mesmerized. The pacing, the dialogue, spot on. 

 

The location shots? Gorgeous. As much a character in the movie as Ann.

 

The detective was the guy from the Twilight Zone who puts masks on his kids as he is dying, and they can't take them off, right?

 

Dark Passage? Always good to see. Still find it disconcerting that the hands in the beginning of the movie weren't Bogey's. Again, the location shots, loved them. Did I see the bell tower from Vertigo? Love the cable car turnaround near Florsheim. Poor Florsheim, they made it all the way into the late 1960s, and then garbage shoes put them out of business. Bogey and Baby - gorgeous together.

 

Still can't believe that was Tierney, no matter how many times I've seen Born to Kill. Didn't last, but I had seen it before, and it wasn't a pleasant picture, for sure.

 

Excellent lineup.

Oh, and how amazing that the film was lost.

 

And found. And restored.

 

I wonder how many other films out there are lost forever.

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First things first. TCM should hire Eddie. Pair him with Ben.

 

Wow. Now that's what I call TCM, like in the old days.

 

Except for me asking Ann: Dog? What dog? Dog? Did you remember you had a dog? Hello, lady? DOG? until she finally remembered she had it locked up all day, I was mesmerized. The pacing, the dialogue, spot on. 

 

The location shots? Gorgeous. As much a character in the movie as Ann.

 

The detective was the guy from the Twilight Zone who puts masks on his kids as he is dying, and they can't take them off, right?

 

Dark Passage? Always good to see. Still find it disconcerting that the hands in the beginning of the movie weren't Bogey's. Again, the location shots, loved them. Did I see the bell tower from Vertigo? Love the cable car turnaround near Florsheim. Poor Florsheim, they made it all the way into the late 1960s, and then garbage shoes put them out of business. Bogey and Baby - gorgeous together.

 

Still can't believe that was Tierney, no matter how many times I've seen Born to Kill. Didn't last, but I had seen it before, and it wasn't a pleasant picture, for sure.

 

Excellent lineup.

Incidentally, character actor Robert Keith has a role in WOMAN ON THE RUN. He was Brian Keith's father.

 

Said in an Elaine Bennis voice: GET OUTTA HERE!

 

The guy from the Twilight Zone episode was Brian Keith's father? Six degrees of separation? Brian committed suicide and so did Robert's third wife, who jumped from the Hollywood(land) sign? HOLY cow!!!!! I can't believe Eddie didn't tell us that!

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Incidentally, character actor Robert Keith has a role in WOMAN ON THE RUN. He was Brian Keith's father.

 

Said in an Elaine Bennis voice: GET OUTTA HERE!

 

The guy from the Twilight Zone episode was Brian Keith's father? Six degrees of separation? Brian committed suicide and so did Robert's third wife, who jumped from the Hollywood(land) sign? HOLY cow!!!!! I can't believe Eddie didn't tell us that!

 Robert Keith..........The Twilight Zone ("The Masks"), which was his last screen effort, in the role of Jason Foster, the rich New Orleans patriarch to a self-centered, greed-riddled family awaiting their benefactor to die.

 

I hope you've all seen it.

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 Robert Keith..........The Twilight Zone ("The Masks"), which was his last screen effort, in the role of Jason Foster, the rich New Orleans patriarch to a self-centered, greed-riddled family awaiting their benefactor to die.

 

I hope you've all seen it.

On Dark Passage:

 

Wouldn't YOU like to see a doc with a cigarette in his mouth looking down on you after you've had major surgery? About that surgery, wasn't that doctor AMAzing?

 

Hah!

 

Loved Tom D'Andrea. From Life of Riley, right? Yup, I was right, he was Gillis. Imagine, not getting further in his career and having to resort to television (as did Bendix for that matter). He was understated, didn't chew the scenery like Kate, and emoted just right.

 

It must stink to be an actor.

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Incidentally, character actor Robert Keith has a role in WOMAN ON THE RUN. He was Brian Keith's father.

 

Said in an Elaine Bennis voice: GET OUTTA HERE!

 

The guy from the Twilight Zone episode was Brian Keith's father? Six degrees of separation? Brian committed suicide and so did Robert's third wife, who jumped from the Hollywood(land) sign? HOLY cow!!!!! I can't believe Eddie didn't tell us that!

It's Elaine B-E-N-E-S

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First things first. TCM should hire Eddie. Pair him with Ben.

 

Wow. Now that's what I call TCM, like in the old days.

 

Except for me asking Ann: Dog? What dog? Dog? Did you remember you had a dog? Hello, lady? DOG? until she finally remembered she had it locked up all day, I was mesmerized. The pacing, the dialogue, spot on. 

 

The location shots? Gorgeous. As much a character in the movie as Ann.

 

The detective was the guy from the Twilight Zone who puts masks on his kids as he is dying, and they can't take them off, right?

 

Dark Passage? Always good to see. Still find it disconcerting that the hands in the beginning of the movie weren't Bogey's. Again, the location shots, loved them. Did I see the bell tower from Vertigo? Love the cable car turnaround near Florsheim. Poor Florsheim, they made it all the way into the late 1960s, and then garbage shoes put them out of business. Bogey and Baby - gorgeous together.

 

Still can't believe that was Tierney, no matter how many times I've seen Born to Kill. Didn't last, but I had seen it before, and it wasn't a pleasant picture, for sure.

 

Excellent lineup.

Great post. Totally agree that San Francisco is just as much a main character in these films Muller selected, as the people played by the actors. At first, since WOMAN ON THE RUN had a modest budget, I was afraid we'd have mostly studio shots with cheap rear projection of San Francisco. But it was obvious that two-thirds of the story was filmed on location-- loved seeing Ann Sheridan walk down some of those streets. 

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 Robert Keith..........The Twilight Zone ("The Masks"), which was his last screen effort, in the role of Jason Foster, the rich New Orleans patriarch to a self-centered, greed-riddled family awaiting their benefactor to die.

 

I hope you've all seen it.

Robert Keith also appears in several Frank Sinatra films-- GUYS AND DOLLS; and YOUNG AT HEART (as a doting father who disapproves of Sinatra romancing his daughter, played by Doris Day). Of course, Doris would costar with son Brian Keith in WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL.

 

I agree that Robert Keith's Twilight Zone episode is among the series' best.

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For Ann Sheridan to fall for a nerd like the Kent Smith character stretches credibility. I guess her mother always told her that she should marry a doctor.

Yes, that must have been the initial draw. But I think he was supposed to appeal to Nora, because he was the opposite of Robert Alda's character-- a man who lived a very safe suburban life, had a noble profession, and was so vanilla that a gal like Sheridan could find it a bit thrilling to corrupt him. I would say she unleashed a kinkiness in him, and he functioned as a strange stabilizing force for her.

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I just found a somewhat similar thread (but not exactly the same) over at the Summer of Darkness forum.

 

Someone mentioned Joan Crawford's SUDDEN FEAR also taking place in Frisco (Eddie Muller, please show this film). Then, there's BORN TO BE BAD with Joan Fontaine, as well as THE HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL, a Fox noir with Richard Basehart.

 

Here's the link to the other thread:

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/53520-looking-for-san-francisco-noir-suggestions/

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Great post. Totally agree that San Francisco is just as much a main character in these films Muller selected, as the people played by the actors. At first, since WOMAN ON THE RUN had a modest budget, I was afraid we'd have mostly studio shots with cheap rear projection of San Francisco. But it was obvious that two-thirds of the story was filmed on location-- loved seeing Ann Sheridan walk down some of those streets. 

Thanks, TB.

 

I thought it was interesting that they used her voiceover when they showed the two of the them walking, rather than actual dialogue.

 

Oh, and I don't know if everyone got that O'Keefe was the killer before the shot of the lighter, but the tension there was well done.

 

As was the wisdom not to show the murder of the Asian dancer.

 

And wasn't it nice to see Hop Sing/Number Two son? 

 

Who here said that she got a three picture deal after this? Eddie said it didn't kickstart her career as she wished, and I was bummed that she was washed up at the ripe old age of 33!

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Thanks, TB.

 

I thought it was interesting that they used her voiceover when they showed the two of the them walking, rather than actual dialogue.

 

Oh, and I don't know if everyone got that O'Keefe was the killer before the shot of the lighter, but the tension there was well done.

 

As was the wisdom not to show the murder of the Asian dancer.

 

And wasn't it nice to see Hop Sing/Number Two son? 

 

Who here said that she got a three picture deal after this? Eddie said it didn't kickstart her career as she wished, and I was bummed that she was washed up at the ripe old age of 33!

At the time she made this film, she was involved in a prolonged court battle with Howard Hughes, who was trying to back out of a deal that his predecessors signed with Ann just as he was taking over control of RKO. The litigation raged on for a few years-- but she eventually won and Hughes had to put her in a new film plus pay her for the film he had removed her from.

 

When she made WOMAN ON THE RUN, she had just finished a two-picture deal at Fox, and now she was starting a three-picture deal at Universal. After she was done at Universal, she went back to RKO to make APPOINTMENT IN HONDURAS, the one Hughes was forced to produce with her.

 

So her film career was not done at this point-- and in fact, she would keep making movies until her last one at Republic in 1956 (which is probably her best one-- COME NEXT SPRING with Steve Cochran, which Ann herself called her own personal favorite). When she was at Republic, she was hoping to reinvent herself in mother roles-- but Republic was about to close. RKO, which Hughes had sold, was already shutting down.

 

She had a supporting role in MGM's musical remake of THE WOMEN, called THE OPPOSITE SEX. But clearly, Ann's options in movies were dwindling. She would soon head to New York to find stage work and do television (a role on an east coast-based soap opera).

 

I think what Muller was referring to was that Ann was trying to recapture the glory of her Warners years when she made WOMAN ON THE RUN. But that was simply not going to happen. When you are a freelancer doing independent features like this one, distributed by a major studio, you are just not going to get the type of publicity and fuss they lavish on the younger starlets. Also, she was a heavy drinker and had noticeable weight gain at this point, so her image was changing (in more ways than one)-- and all she could do was ride it out and keep her movie career going as long as possible. And that is what she did, until she turned exclusively to TV.

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At the time she made this film, she was involved in a prolonged court battle with Howard Hughes, who was trying to back out of a deal that his predecessors signed with Ann just as he was taking over control of RKO. The litigation raged on for a few years-- but she eventually won and Hughes had to put her in a new film plus pay her for the film he had removed her from.

 

When she made WOMAN ON THE RUN, she had just finished a two-picture deal at Fox, and now she was starting a three-picture deal at Universal. After she was done at Universal, she went back to RKO to make APPOINTMENT IN HONDURAS, the one Hughes was forced to produce with her.

 

So her film career was not done at this point-- and in fact, she would keep making movies until her last one at Republic in 1956 (which is probably her best one-- COME NEXT SPRING with Steve Cochran, which Ann herself called her own personal favorite). When she was at Republic, she was hoping to reinvent herself in mother roles-- but Republic was about to close. RKO, which Hughes had sold, was already shutting down.

 

She had a supporting role in MGM's musical remake of THE WOMEN, called THE OPPOSITE SEX. But clearly, Ann's options in movies were dwindling. She would soon head to New York to find stage work and do television (a role on an east coast-based soap opera).

 

I think what Muller was referring to was that Ann was trying to recapture the glory of her Warners years when she made WOMAN ON THE RUN. But that was simply not going to happen. When you are a freelancer doing independent features like this one, distributed by a major studio, you are just not going to get the type of publicity and fuss they lavish on the younger starlets. Also, she was a heavy drinker and had noticeable weight gain at this point, so her image was changing (in more ways than one)-- and all she could do was ride it out and keep her movie career going as long as possible. And that is what she did, until she turned exclusively to TV.

Ah, thanks TB. Why am I not surprised about Howard Hughes.

 

How sad. I thought she looked older than 33, so that's the reason. Look at The Great Profile, he looked a hundred years old thanks to drink. 

 

Which I don't fault any of them for turning to. 

 

Like old age, acting is not for the weak. It must have been even worse back then, with the casting couch and misogynistic studio men. Then again, look at today and the proliferation of older female actors.........insert cricket sounds here.

 

Feminism is dead.

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