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jaygill1

In your spare time - check out some of this Neo-Noir list

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Loving the Ball State course so far and got to see two films tonight on TCM "Woman on the Run" and "Dark Passage" (DVRing "Born To Kill" right now).

Anyway, in the spirit of Summer of Darkness, check out this cool, comprehensive list on Neo-noir classics when you have time. It's pretty good!

Taste of Cinema Best 75 Neo-noir Films

 

Have fun in the course everyone!
JP
 

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JP

 

Thank you for this list. I had not heard of some of the films. FYI: the Criterion Edition of Friends of Eddie Coyle has a couple of fine essays, including an interview-based one with Robert Mitchum. You might enjoy it. 

 

Gabriel

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Anyway, in the spirit of Summer of Darkness, check out this cool, comprehensive list on Neo-noir classics when you have time. It's pretty good!

Taste of Cinema Best 75 Neo-noir Films

 

 

 

 

 

Neo noirs are even harder to define than Noirs, it's all subjective, one man's Neo Noir is another man's POS, lol, I've been on a personal quest to collect and or make a list of the best. Of that list you posted I haven't seen about a third, agree with about a third, disagree with about a third, and notice quite a few that I have found that are missing. 

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Here is my personal Neo Noir list (in progress):

 

 

Blast Of Silence (1961) 
 
Underworld USA (1961) 
 
Something Wild (1961) 
 
Cape Fear (1962) 
 
Experiment In Terror (1962) 
 
Satan in High Heels (1962) 
 
The Manchurian Candidate (1962) 
 
Shock Corridor (1962) 
 
Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962) 
 
The Naked Kiss (1964) 
 
The Pawnbroker (1964) 
 
Brainstorm (1965) 
 
Once A Thief (1965) 
 
Harper (1966) 
 
Mr. Buddwing (1966) 
 
In Cold Blood (1967) 
 
In The Heat Of The Night (1967) 
 
The Great Silence (1968)
 
Marlowe (1969) 
 
The Honeymoon Killers (1970) 
 
Shaft  (1971)
 
Across 110th Street (1971) 
 
The Getaway (1971) 
 
Get Carter (1971) 
 
Hickey & Boggs (1972)
 
Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974) 
 
The Nickel Ride (1974)
 
The Drowning Pool (1975) 
 
Farewell My Lovely (1975) 
 
Night Moves (1975) 
 
Taxi Driver (1976)
 
Dressed to Kill (1980) 
 
Union City (1980) 
 
Body Heat (1981) 
 
Thief (1981)
 
Blade Runner (1982) 
 
Hammett (1982) 
 
Blood Simple (1984) 
 
Blue Velvet (1986) 
 
Angel Heart (1987) 
 
Frantic (1988) 
 
Kill Me Again (1989)
 
The Grifters (1990) 
 
The Kill-Off (1990) 
 
Wild At Heart (1990) 
 
Dick Tracy (1990) 
 
Delicatessen (1991) 
 
Delusion (1991)
 
Reservoir Dogs (1992) 
 
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) 
 
Romeo Is Bleeding (1993)
 
True Romance (1993) 
 
The Wrong Man (1993)
 
The Last Seduction (1994) 
 
Pulp Fiction (1994) 
 
Se7en (1995) 
 
Fargo (1996) 
 
Mulholland Falls (1996) 
 
Hit Me (1996)
 
Jackie Brown (1997) 
 
L.A. Confidential (1997) 
 
Lost Highway (1997) 
 
This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) 
 
Dark City (1998) 
 
A Simple Plan (1998) 
 
The Big Lebowski (1998) 
 
Payback (1999)
 
Night Train (1999) 
 
The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001) 
 
Mulholland Drive (2001) 
 
The Salton Sea (2002)
 
Sin City (2005) 
 
Brick  (2005)
 
No Country For Old Men (2007) 
 
The Killer Inside Me (2010)
 
Sin City: A Dame To Kill For (2014)
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I'd add another one: House of Games.  Wonderful characters, lots of twists and turns, lots of the requisite cigarette smoke, and some dynamite dialogue from David Mamet. ("Oh, you're a bad pony. I'm not gonna bet on you.")

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Great list.

 

You know, I never liked Titanic. Whenever someone asks me what should have won the Best Picture Oscar over Titanic, I always say that L.A. Confidential should have won. Great story, great acting, it immerses you in the '50s L.A., film noir.

 

Kat

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JP

 

Thank you for this list. I had not heard of some of the films. FYI: the Criterion Edition of Friends of Eddie Coyle has a couple of fine essays, including an interview-based one with Robert Mitchum. You might enjoy it. 

 

Gabriel

I got the Criterion release of The Friends of Eddie Coyle in 2009 when it came out. Yes, I very much enjoy it! I'm a huge fan of the film and novel. So much so, I produced a tribute project to it. Check it out!

 

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Personally, I thought Sin City was a great homage to the genre, and should at least get honorable mention.

 

 

Here is my personal Neo Noir list (in progress):

 

 

....... 
The Manchurian Candidate (1962) 
...
...

Great List Cigar Joe! I love your selection of "The Manchurian Candidate". That is a great example of classic as well as neo-noir (imho).  Being from Boston, I am also partial to "The Friends of Eddie Coyle" (The 1973 film as well as the novel). :)

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Call it what you want neo or whatever, but body heat would be my pick,it has all the elements i think a noir film Should have, elements that moves it from being a drama or a thriller. I just can't see the titanic as noir.

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Another just watched last night to add to my list Derailed (2005) its got a great Noir story line, too bad it didn't have more stylistic cinematography to match it. 7/10 

 

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Call it what you want neo or whatever, but body heat would be my pick,it has all the elements i think a noir film Should have, elements that moves it from being a drama or a thriller.

 

Certainly Body Heat is noir, it is essentially a remake of Double Indemnity.

 

There have been some other interesting remakes of classic noirs, some successful some not so.  Against All Odds was a remake of Out of the Past, and even had a cameo by Jane Greer.  No Way Out (1987) was a remake of no... not No Way Out (1950) nor No Way Out (1973), but of The Big Clock.

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Great list.

 

You know, I never liked Titanic. Whenever someone asks me what should have won the Best Picture Oscar over Titanic, I always say that L.A. Confidential should have won. Great story, great acting, it immerses you in the '50s L.A., film noir.

 

Kat

Titanic was very entertaining first time I saw it, but not so much after that.  Never watch it anymore.  L.A. Confidential is one of my favorites and watch it at least once a year.

Always thought it was interesting that may Best Picture winners are seldom shown after a couple of years, but the runner-ups go on for years and years and years.

As for another neo-noir:  The Hot Spot (1990).

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I'd like to add last year's NIGHTCRAWLER to the list, directed by Dan Gilroy, starring a fantastic Jake Gyllenhaal. 

And seeing Windig Refn's DRIVE on the list, I'd think his latest (much maligned, but ultra cool) ONLY GOD FORGIVES is also a worthy candidate. 

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Narrow Margin (1990) with Gene Hackman and Anne Archer  is a remake of The Narrow Margin (1952) with Charles McGraw, Marie Windsor and Jacqueline White.  Both are very good movies, but I watch The Narrow Margin more often.

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That list of 75 is all over the map, and while many of those films are entertaining, I think they are outside of the boundaries of film noir or neo-noir. Many are simply entertaining crime films (Carlito's Way, Dirty Harry, etc.).

 

But I love cigarjoe's list and have seen just about every one of those films. One False Move, Blood Simple, L A Confidential and No Way Out are particular favorites, but the single best film on that list to me is the stunning The Last Seduction. Perfect plot, perfect casting, but sadly a technicality disqualified the film from being eligible for the Academy Awards (it was shown on cable before being released to theatres. Linda Fiorentino should have cruised to a Best Actress award, and if any of you have not seen this film, I highly encourage you to do so immediately and then watch it a second time. Director John Dahl really nailed it, and did so again with Red Rock West.

 

Other more recent films not on his list that might match the definition for me are Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (Lumet), The Usual Suspects (McQuarrie), The Game (Fincher), Memento (Nolan - and perhaps his Following, also), The Spanish Prisoner (Mamet) and Cop Land (Mangold) - the latter perhaps containing the single best performance Sly Stallone ever gave. Also, although primarily a character study, one could argue for Billy Bob Thornton's Sling Blade.

 

In a different thread I even suggested last year's Gone Girl, despite the brightness and color. I don't want to give away the plot by suggesting a comparison to one of the films above, but I think it has all the elements to qualify. Ditto The Drop, with Tom Hardy and James Gandolfini.

 

I also recently came across a small indie called Bad Turn Worse and highly recommend it (my god, the title alone is almost a description of the genre!). Great performances by all, but especially Mark Pellegrino.

 

I'm always up for a great recommendation - keep 'em coming, folks!

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 The Last Seduction. Perfect plot, perfect casting, but sadly a technicality disqualified the film from being eligible for the Academy Awards (it was shown on cable before being released to theatres. Linda Fiorentino should have cruised to a Best Actress award, and if any of you have not seen this film, I highly encourage you to do so immediately and then watch it a second time. Director John Dahl really nailed it, and did so again with Red Rock West.

 

 

I scanned the list but didn't note The Last Seduction.  That is a movie that TCM should show.   And Linda Fiorentino did deserve an Oscar.

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The list is excellent.

 

The Drop written by Dennis Lehane of Mystic River fame originally appeared in a fiction collection called Boston Noir.  I haven't seen the film, but it's a terrific noir story.  Sometimes, these don't translate to the screen as film noir, but the right story content can go a long way in driving it there.  

 

There's a lot of Jim Thompson stories in the neo-noir list.  Not surprising, and maybe an example of the content doing the driving.  Jim Thompson took the lurid stories of James M. Cain one step further.  Thompson also plays great mind games and gets inside the reader's head.  I note the following films based on Thompson in CJ's neo-noir list;

 

The Getaway (1971) 

The Grifters (1990)

This World, Then the Fireworks (1997)

The Killer Inside Me (2010)

 

Thompson brought the "noir fiction" category to new highs/lows, depending on your viewpoint.  There are some other Thompson's also on film,  like a version of Population 1280, arguably his head-game masterpiece, called Coup de Torchon (1981, directed by Bernard Tavernier). 

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The list is excellent.

 

The Drop written by Dennis Lehane of Mystic River fame originally appeared in a fiction collection called Boston Noir.  I haven't seen the film, but it's a terrific noir story.  Sometimes, these don't translate to the screen as film noir, but the right story content can go a long way in driving it there.  

 

There's a lot of Jim Thompson stories in the neo-noir list.  Not surprising, and maybe an example of the content doing the driving.  Jim Thompson took the lurid stories of James M. Cain one step further.  Thompson also plays great mind games and gets inside the reader's head.  I note the following films based on Thompson in CJ's neo-noir list;

 

The Getaway (1971) 

The Grifters (1990)

This World, Then the Fireworks (1997)

The Killer Inside Me (2010)

 

Thompson brought the "noir fiction" category to new highs/lows, depending on your viewpoint.  There are some other Thompson's also on film,  like a version of Population 1280, arguably his head-game masterpiece, called Coup de Torchon (1981, directed by Bernard Tavernier). 

A heads up Hit Me (1996) is also a Thompson, and for Thompson aficionados he actually makes a cameo as Judge Grayle in 1975's Farewell My Lovely

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A heads up Hit Me (1996) is also a Thompson, and for Thompson aficionados he actually makes a cameo as Judge Grayle in 1975's Farewell My Lovely

Thanks.  That makes two things worth following-up.  I've never seen Hit Me, but given it's Thompson, it's got to be seen.

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Pop. 1280 is my absolute favorite Jim Thompson novel. Coup de Torchon is an excellent adaptation though the ending is a bit surreal. Tavernier has an excellent discussion of noir as a extra on the DVD. I recommend both the book and the DVD.

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Pop. 1280 is my absolute favorite Jim Thompson novel. Coup de Torchon is an excellent adaptation though the ending is a bit surreal. Tavernier has an excellent discussion of noir as a extra on the DVD. I recommend both the book and the DVD.

I've seen the film but have never read Pop. 1280, I'll have to check it out thanks.

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Sub genre Comedy Noir:

 

Dead men don't wear plaid

 

Mike Case in: The Big Kiss Off

 

 

Any thoughts on Comedy noir?

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