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LawrenceA
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I read an article yesterday that said this quarter was poised to be the first in which streaming surpassed dvd/blu-ray in sales. I was curious how many of you still bought dvds.

 

I still buy dvds and blu-rays, and even the occasional vhs. I still use vhs to tape films sometimes. There are three VCRs,three dvd players and one blu-ray player in my household. I have literally hundreds of titles across the various formats in my library.

 

I also have Amazon Prime and of course YouTube through which I can stream movies, but I just can't build up much interest in doing so. I think I've watched maybe three full films on YouTube, all of which were hard to find titles such as "The Blue Veil". And I've only watched one film on Amazon Prime, 1970's "The Revolutionary".

 

And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

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I read an article yesterday that said this quarter was poised to be the first in which streaming surpassed dvd/blu-ray in sales. I was curious how many of you still bought dvds.

 

I still buy dvds and blu-rays, and even the occasional vhs. I still use vhs to tape films sometimes. There are three VCRs,three dvd players and one blu-ray player in my household. I have literally hundreds of titles across the various formats in my library.

 

I also have Amazon Prime and of course YouTube through which I can stream movies, but I just can't build up much interest in doing so. I think I've watched maybe three full films on YouTube, all of which were hard to find titles such as "The Blue Veil". And I've only watched one film on Amazon Prime, 1970's "The Revolutionary".

 

And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

Well, remember that people who pooh-poohed DVDs and clung to VCRs and the VHS format may have been old-fashioned thinking too. And then there were those who would not jump on the Blu-ray bandwagon. But ultimately, you use the type of media (and technology) you are most comfortable with, that is the bottom line here.

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Completely agree with you regarding physical vs virtual. 

 

I can't do the digital copies thing.  I like to watch movies using my blu-ray/dvd player, not streaming on my computer.  I do subscribe to Netflix, so I will watch the occasional streaming movie on there or streaming through the Dish On Demand, but that's it.  I know that I could hook my laptop up to the TV via HDMI and stream that way, but sometimes that can be frustrating if the internet connection is being stupid that day.

 

I like having the physical disk in my hand, I can't even do the burned movies to disk either.  There's something about having a bookshelf full of DVD cases with professional cover art and spines facing out showing the names of the films.  I can't do the burned DVDs in binders or anything like that.

 

So yes, I've bought many Blu-Rays and DVDs recently.  I use TCM to watch movies and see if I like them enough to own my own copy, and then if I decided that the movie could be re-watched multiple times, then I'll start looking for one.  Despite the lack of bonus features, I do purchase the Warner Archives disks because many times, that's the only way you'll have a copy of that film.  It's better than waiting for it to re-air on TCM again.  Of all the films I've purchased from them, all the prints have been decent, so I'm satisfied.  Plus, new films are released all the time, which is also exciting. 

 

Plus with digital, I always worry about what happens if my hard drive were to crash.  I know I could back everything up or put it up in "The Cloud" or whatever, but I like having the physical copies on hand. 

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I read an article yesterday that said this quarter was poised to be the first in which streaming surpassed dvd/blu-ray in sales. I was curious how many of you still bought dvds.

 

I still buy dvds and blu-rays, and even the occasional vhs. I still use vhs to tape films sometimes. There are three VCRs,three dvd players and one blu-ray player in my household. I have literally hundreds of titles across the various formats in my library.

 

I also have Amazon Prime and of course YouTube through which I can stream movies, but I just can't build up much interest in doing so. I think I've watched maybe three full films on YouTube, all of which were hard to find titles such as "The Blue Veil". And I've only watched one film on Amazon Prime, 1970's "The Revolutionary".

 

And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

Only if I really love the show, and want to have a copy when Netflix vaporizes the show from its lineup.

 

I resisted Netflix for the longest time because of the charge on top of the already overpriced cable fees. However, I have been gobsmacked by the variety of programming that is available, and the way Big Brother at Netflix 'recommends' shows it 'thinks' I might like. Scary, but hey, the future is now.

 

What I love is the fact that streaming is more than a few nails in the coffin of the greedy rotten so and so's in the cable industry. I look forward to them going away forever.

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Only if I really love the show, and want to have a copy when Netflix vaporizes the show from its lineup.

 

What I love is the fact that streaming is more than a few nails in the coffin of the greedy rotten so and so's in the cable industry. I look forward to them going away forever.

The only problem is, if you look at what's going on with the various streaming services, such as Netflix starting to implement commercials, tiers of service at higher prices, so called "channels" within a service(like with YouTube), they are all just morphing back into what the old tv providers became. Meet the new boss, same ad the old boss, as they say.

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I read an article yesterday that said this quarter was poised to be the first in which streaming surpassed dvd/blu-ray in sales. I was curious how many of you still bought dvds.

I still buy dvds and blu-rays, and even the occasional vhs. I still use vhs to tape films sometimes. There are three VCRs,three dvd players and one blu-ray player in my household. I have literally hundreds of titles across the various formats in my library.

I also have Amazon Prime and of course YouTube through which I can stream movies, but I just can't build up much interest in doing so. I think I've watched maybe three full films on YouTube, all of which were hard to find titles such as "The Blue Veil". And I've only watched one film on Amazon Prime, 1970's "The Revolutionary".

And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

Totally agree. I am Old School when it comes to technology, resisting new formats as long as I can. Unfortunately, with this approach, when I finally jump on a bandwagon, it may already be phasing out. But I too like the physical dvd, as opposed to streaming, etc. Just a couple of weeks back, I bought my first streaming movie through Amazon Prime, only because I dispaired of finding it on dvd, never mind it being an upcoming release. I also just bought my first bluray player, in the (possibly mistaken) understanding that they play all region dvds. So I also bought my first European Region2 dvd, through Amazon, and hoping it'll play when it arrives.

 

Not surprising to anyone who knows me, the streamed film I bought, BLACK SPURS (1965), and Region 2 dvd, GLI ULTIMI CINQUE MINUTI/THE LAST FIVE MINUTES (1955), both feature my favorite actress, Linda Darnell.

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Only if I really love the show, and want to have a copy when Netflix vaporizes the show from its lineup.

 

I resisted Netflix for the longest time because of the charge on top of the already overpriced cable fees. However, I have been gobsmacked by the variety of programming that is available, and the way Big Brother at Netflix 'recommends' shows it 'thinks' I might like. Scary, but hey, the future is now.

 

What I love is the fact that streaming is more than a few nails in the coffin of the greedy rotten so and so's in the cable industry. I look forward to them going away forever.

Yes, but how do we know that the streaming companies will not become the next wave of greedy so-and-so's. Or that the cable TV people won't move into the areas of newer technology when they lose their jobs that revolved around the older technology. They'll take their same business strategies with them.  

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The only problem is, if you look at what's going on with the various streaming services, such as Netflix starting to implement commercials, tiers of service at higher prices, so called "channels" within a service(like with YouTube), they are all just morphing back into what the old tv providers became. Meet the new boss, same ad the old boss, as they say.

Yes, that is what I think, too. These business models are already well established. They are just reinventing the wheel in a way, and re-charging everyone for it.

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I have ideas about the physical versus virtual/digital.

 

We are using the terms virtual and digital synonymously, no...?

 

It's like someone who enjoys old-fashioned books or someone who prefers e-texts. Usually people do not throw books away because electronic texts become available. And sometimes people still print the e-texts out so they can study and mark-up a physical copy of the text.

 

I do not see one form completely replacing another. Instead, we will just have multiple formats for multiple purposes.

 

This applies to movies and TV programs and music, also. It is really not an old school versus new school thing. It's just a widening of the possible formats that can be used to access or use something.

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The only problem is, if you look at what's going on with the various streaming services, such as Netflix starting to implement commercials, tiers of service at higher prices, so called "channels" within a service(like with YouTube), they are all just morphing back into what the old tv providers became. Meet the new boss, same ad the old boss, as they say.

Good point.

 

Guess I'd better not wish for the demise of overpriced cable too loud, I might get my wish.

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I'll stick with cable until it dies.

Still purchase DVD's-lots of them.  Make DVD's from TV as well.

Have a Blu Ray player and purchased one Blu Ray movie by accident - not impressed.  Will probably never purchase another Blu Ray disc.  Have three other DVD players.

Fortunately there are still mail order companies out there that sell tremendous number of DVD's. Heartlandmusic.com, Oldies.com, CCVideo.com, Hamiltonbook.com for a few.  While some specialize in music or books, they also sell DVD's.  They also send out real paper catalogs!

Do not stream anything.  I use a PC and it is only on when I am on it.  Also, my wireless function is disabled.

So, yes to cable and big yes to DVD's.

Oh, and I also still purchase CD's and do not use any download or streaming music services.

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I read an article yesterday that said this quarter was poised to be the first in which streaming surpassed dvd/blu-ray in sales. I was curious how many of you still bought dvds.

 

I still buy dvds and blu-rays, and even the occasional vhs. I still use vhs to tape films sometimes. There are three VCRs,three dvd players and one blu-ray player in my household. I have literally hundreds of titles across the various formats in my library.

 

I also have Amazon Prime and of course YouTube through which I can stream movies, but I just can't build up much interest in doing so. I think I've watched maybe three full films on YouTube, all of which were hard to find titles such as "The Blue Veil". And I've only watched one film on Amazon Prime, 1970's "The Revolutionary".

 

And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

 

I agree with you. I have been reluctant to adopt the newest technologies until I feel that the bugs are worked out and an acceptable  standard has been established.

I held out a long time before going the way of DVDs, and just now am beginning to adopt some HD & BluRay.

 

As far as "Cloud" storeage anything goes, which is just access to somebody elses servers, I refuse to trust or allow anyone sole custody of anything I value. And I certainly do not want to voluntarily place myself at the mercy of any on-line service or institution for material that I wish to remain secure and private, anymore than I am now forced to do so.

 

However, I have "lost" my personal hardcopy library (and other possessions), while trying to "store" them when out-of-country.

And I've found that trying to lug all my "stuff" around, along with a now quite large media collection, to be impractical.

In as much as I loved my records, many years ago I converted my LPs and 45s to cassette, and then went from cassette to CD.

So as much as I love my hardcopy, VHS & DVD video, and CD music collections I've been converting most of my audio, video and paper media to digital in recent years, just so I can retain relative convenient access.

I can carry hundreds of movies and thousands of books and songs on a single, large capacity compact hard drive.

Music sounds good with external speakers. The videos can be viewed on either a portable PC or a big-screen TV, as available, and I can act as my own "Cloud" and keep an ereader  full of hundreds of easily accessed favorites.

None-of-this replaces the enjoyment or ease of having a hard copy book in hand, and one is "married" to electricity and the limitations of each technology, but I have found that this "compromise" allows me, for the most part, to "have-my-cake-and-eat-it-too."

Plus I can reburn back to CD & DVD if I so choose.

 

Sadly, though, digital is the most friable, transient and possesses the least longevity of any of the preceding technologies.

When adequately maintained, paper can last perhaps for centuries, a good quality record, CD, or DVD has the potential of lasting perhaps a hundred years if stored properly. But digital can vanish with a click, or from a burst of unshielded electrons.

Lord knows what will be available to watch or play this "old" technology in the decades to come.

VHS players can still be had, but phonograph players are now pretty much relics.

Technology changes so rapidly these days that who can say what the future will bring.

So aside from having a few extra DVD players around, I am realizing that most likely nothing of this kind that I  enjoy and possess today will likely long out-live me.

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Well, like Lawrence & Stephen have said, I am not convinced of the stability. 

 

What I am referring to is the endless "upgrades" that will be required streaming movies and other content on the 'net. Once you start enjoying whatever service you have, soon you'll have to upgrade your service, your browser, your TV.

I'm amazed at how often I'm prompted to upgrade Flash, browsers and even operating systems on my computer.

 

While I have a wireless connection on my big TV, I haven't been impressed with streaming-pixelation, sputters and often a very dark picture. What happens if you fall asleep and want to re-watch what you've streamed?

 

Having a DVD allows me to go back and rewatch where I slipped off. Do you think streaming will give you that opportunity? Sure. They'll just charge you again!

 

Besides, I like having the physical disk so I can share movies/documentaries I like with others.

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I have a multi region player and purchase dvds from all over the world.  And record TCM movies of course.

 

I'm not convinced that the catalogue of films on our online services offers much of anything that I am interested in.

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I have no interest in "streaming" movies either.  Nor watching them on either a phone, tablet(which I don't have), or on my computer monitor.  I prefer the comfort of my living room, and large screen, wide screen TV set.(with the sound channelled through my sound system).

 

I too, still utilize a VCR, but for certain occasions.  I've long ago stopped recording and/or copying movies with the device, and any movies I get through the proccess of "copying" are usually "copied" by my daughter, who does have a Netflix account, but also prefers a physical disc she can just "pop" in without going through a lot of needless fol-de-rol.  She'll sometimes(IF she can find them) load and burn movies for me, and it'll only cost me a nice dinner, or the cost of the disc or, if my BIRTHDAY or someting is coming up, nothing at all!  :)

 

But of course, there ARE those people who, when it comes to either fashion or technology or both, just LOVE being led around by their noses like mindless sheep  by other people, who have a LOT to gain, fooled them( no big feat) into thinking "THIS is how it SHOULD be, because WE say so!"

 

 

Sepiatone

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I have no interest in "streaming" movies either.  Nor watching them on either a phone, tablet(which I don't have), or on my computer monitor.  I prefer the comfort of my living room, and large screen, wide screen TV set.(with the sound channelled through my sound system).

 

I too, still utilize a VCR, but for certain occasions.  I've long ago stopped recording and/or copying movies with the device, and any movies I get through the proccess of "copying" are usually "copied" by my daughter, who does have a Netflix account, but also prefers a physical disc she can just "pop" in without going through a lot of needless fol-de-rol.  She'll sometimes(IF she can find them) load and burn movies for me, and it'll only cost me a nice dinner, or the cost of the disc or, if my BIRTHDAY or someting is coming up, nothing at all!  :)

 

But of course, there ARE those people who, when it comes to either fashion or technology or both, just LOVE being led around by their noses like mindless sheep  by other people, who have a LOT to gain, fooled them( no big feat) into thinking "THIS is how it SHOULD be, because WE say so!"

 

 

Sepiatone

Trust me, no one leads me around by my nose.

 

But when a new technology has benefits above and beyond the old technology, I embrace it.

 

You should try it, you might like it.

 

Interesting (ironic, actually), though, that you use Netflix second hand. 

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Some of us (my family at least) have had cable since the early or mid 80s. We first had cable in 1983. That's a long time.

 

It's not so easy to let go sometimes. :)

1982 here. A very long time. Didn't do a darned thing for me when talking to the moron on the phone from FIOS.

 

And crooks that they are, I don't yet see a way to get the stations I want without them. Oh, and they price fix, so all the cable companies are equal thieves in their thieving cabal. ;)

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And I don't know if I can ever get to the point where I would buy digital copies of films. I know it's old-fashioned thinking, but I want the physical item in my hand if I'm buying it.And I don't trust the various cloud services in the slightest.

I wonder if there are any members here who started collecting movies by buying the abridged 8mm copies that were sold way-back-when?

 

When I saw that there was a 12 minute or so version of Abbot and Costello meet Frankenstein on 8mm I just and to have a copy.  I think I must have got it for my birthday.

 

I look back at that with some fascination.  No dvds or streaming, never mind vhs.

 

Still, it was fun to thread up the projector and run these films forward and then backward.  Seeing a film in reverse was hysterical to little kids in those days.  Popeye shorts were great backwards.

 

A friend of mine had a copy of Hammer's The Curse of Frankenstein in abridged 8mm which came with a floppy 45' recording that had a "start projector on tone" signal that allowed you to play the record and the film in a somewhat synchronous way.

 

I think it was the physicality of it that inspired me to grab a camera and start making my own horror movies in 8mm when I was 12.  That and make-up artist Jack Pierce who was sort of a God to me.

 

"Try telling that to the kids of today and they won't believe you" - with apologies to Monty Python

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I have no interest in "streaming" movies either.  Nor watching them on either a phone, tablet(which I don't have), or on my computer monitor.  I prefer the comfort of my living room, and large screen, wide screen TV set.(with the sound channelled through my sound system).

 

I too, still utilize a VCR, but for certain occasions.  I've long ago stopped recording and/or copying movies with the device, and any movies I get through the proccess of "copying" are usually "copied" by my daughter, who does have a Netflix account, but also prefers a physical disc she can just "pop" in without going through a lot of needless fol-de-rol.  She'll sometimes(IF she can find them) load and burn movies for me, and it'll only cost me a nice dinner, or the cost of the disc or, if my BIRTHDAY or someting is coming up, nothing at all!  :)

 

But of course, there ARE those people who, when it comes to either fashion or technology or both, just LOVE being led around by their noses like mindless sheep  by other people, who have a LOT to gain, fooled them( no big feat) into thinking "THIS is how it SHOULD be, because WE say so!"

 

 

Sepiatone

So, you can get a movie onto a disc from netflix? Not too savvy here, but O thought you couldn't do this with streaming.

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1982 here. A very long time. Didn't do a darned thing for me when talking to the moron on the phone from FIOS.

 

And crooks that they are, I don't yet see a way to get the stations I want without them. Oh, and they price fix, so all the cable companies are equal thieves in their thieving cabal. ;)

That's right. The insurance companies do this too. it's a form of graft the politicians allow. 

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That's right. The insurance companies do this too. it's a form of graft the politicians allow. 

Yes. Figures there are cable company lobbyists.

 

Heck, if the puppy mills can find lobbyists, it's no surprise the uber rich Verizon can.

 

Talk about tilting at windmills. :o The best thing I can say for FIOS is that Verizon responds on Twitter to issues with a person's cable. Mind you, they don't accept emails and calling them is like putting an ice pick in your ear, thanks to the phone tree, but Twitter? They respond almost immediately. 

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Yes. Figures there are cable company lobbyists.

 

Heck, if the puppy mills can find lobbyists, it's no surprise the uber rich Verizon can.

 

Talk about tilting at windmills. :o The best thing I can say for FIOS is that Verizon responds on Twitter to issues with a person's cable. Mind you, they don't accept emails and calling them is like putting an ice pick in your ear, thanks to the phone tree, but Twitter? They respond almost immediately. 

Of course there are lobbyists-- too many private interests to protect. 

 

What's amazing is that people are paying these astronomical cable bills. It's sad to see folks getting ripped off. Sometimes it's like people want to be ripped off, because they do not take a stand against it. I am not that way. LOL

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A few years ago Charter's customer service center improved dramatically.  If I call them now, I am talking to a person within 2-3 minutes.  

A year or so ago I had a problem and the service tech fixed it, but also pointed out that my underground cable was improperly grounded per new codes.  Charter came in, ran a complete new line underground from street to my house (including under driveway), then ran two new cables (one heavy duty) to boxes in house.  Also got two new boxes.

At one point had three supervisors, a tech and two contractors on my property for many hours over a two day period.

One thing I find interesting is that people want a 50" HD, 3D, etc. TV, but also watch TV and movies on smartphones, labtops, etc. with little bitty screens.

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A few years ago Charter's customer service center improved dramatically.  If I call them now, I am talking to a person within 2-3 minutes. 

When I moved from Arizona to the midwest, I switched from Time Warner to Charter. I've been relatively happy with Charter. 

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