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One of my favorites is the underrated "I Walk Alone" (1948). It was the first movie that paired Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. Not as well known as his co-stars (Lancaster, Lizabeth Scott and Wendell Corey), Douglas had fourth billing in the cast. Going toe-to-toe with Lancaster, Douglas established himself as bonafide movie star. Along with the requisite dark shadows and menacing scenes, he movie includes gangsters, sad-eyed songstress and one of the best descriptions of corporate operations.

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One of my favorites is the underrated "I Walk Alone" (1948). It was the first movie that paired Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. Not as well known as his co-stars (Lancaster, Lizabeth Scott and Wendell Corey), Douglas had fourth billing in the cast. Going toe-to-toe with Lancaster, Douglas established himself as bonafide movie star. Along with the requisite dark shadows and menacing scenes, he movie includes gangsters, sad-eyed songstress and one of the best descriptions of corporate operations.

 

While I really want to love I Walk Alone I have issues with the film.  At this stage of his career Lancaster wasn't that good of an actor and to me his performance is overstated.   While Scott is lovely she was only a so-so actor.  e.g. there is a scene between Lancaster and Scott that comes off rather juvenile.     

 

The ending doesn't work for me either.   As you said the film has one of the best descriptions of corporate operations (as run by a hood), in movies.   I really like this angle and how Douglas had wised up while Lancaster still has an old time type of hood mentality.    Therefore it just doesn't add up that Douglas would have Corey killed in such a 1920s type of gangster mode.    Nothing corporate about how that was done.    

 

Ok, I understand that the screenwriter(s) wanted this to be a 'Lancaster gets his revenge' type of film,  but to me they took the cheap way out.    Having Corey kill Douglas and than himself would have been a more logical type of ending.  

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I tend to prefer individual performances over whole movies. I'm surprised no one has mentioned Richard Widmark who blended well into the noir landscape. His performance in Pickup on South Street was well executed, and the dialogue is fantastic.  Thelma Ritter's role as Moe in the same film is to me what would happen to all the femme fatales from all the early noir films if they grew older.

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I tend to prefer individual performances over whole movies. I'm surprised no one has mentioned Richard Widmark who blended well into the noir landscape. His performance in Pickup on South Street was well executed, and the dialogue is fantastic.  Thelma Ritter's role as Moe in the same film is to me what would happen to all the femme fatales from all the early noir films if they grew older.

 

Widmark is discussed often at this forum,   especially his noir performances.    The overall thing with Widmark is that he was under contract at 20th Century Fox and TCM doesn't feature many Fox films.   This is because TCM tends to focus on the so called Turner Library of films; Warner Bros, MGM and RKO films and because Fox has their own networks like MOVIES-TV etc... 

 

TCM has shown Pickup on South Street.   Ritter is fantastic as Moe in the film.   Jean Peters also plays a different type of character then her other roles.      Another great Widmark noir is Night and the City,  but TCM hasn't shown this film as far as I know.

 

TCM has featured Kiss of Death and No Way Out.

 

PS:  I assume you like John Payne in noir films.   I never paid much attention to him in musicals (not my favorite genre),  and he didn't have much to do in The Razor's Edge, but I was really impressed with his work in noir films.   

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Widmark is discussed often at this forum,   especially his noir performances.    The overall thing with Widmark is that he was under contract at 20th Century Fox and TCM doesn't feature many Fox films.   This is because TCM tends to focus on the so called Turner Library of films; Warner Bros, MGM and RKO films and because Fox has their own networks like MOVIES-TV etc... 

 

TCM has shown Pickup on South Street.   Ritter is fantastic as Moe in the film.   Jean Peters also plays a different type of character then her other roles.      Another great Widmark noir is Night and the City,  but TCM hasn't shown this film as far as I know.

 

TCM has featured Kiss of Death and No Way Out.

 

PS:  I assume you like John Payne in noir films.   I never paid much attention to him in musicals (not my favorite genre),  and he didn't have much to do in The Razor's Edge, but I was really impressed with his work in noir films.   

i seem to miss all the Widmark discussions then, but this is good to know.  the only problem i have with Night and the City is that i'm a bigger fan of Gerald Kersh than i am of film, so it the adaptation has always been difficult for me.

and yes, i do enjoy John Payne, in fact i was just watching KC Confidential.

thank you though

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i seem to miss all the Widmark discussions then, but this is good to know.  the only problem i have with Night and the City is that i'm a bigger fan of Gerald Kersh than i am of film, so it the adaptation has always been difficult for me.

and yes, i do enjoy John Payne, in fact i was just watching KC Confidential.

thank you though

 

Under General Discussion someone just created a 'more Widmark films' thread,  so others have the same hopes;  that TCM would feature more Widmark films.

 

I'll have to check out the novels and short stories by Kersh.   

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