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They SHOULDNA used it!


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Scenes, dialogue, songs, or other stuff that should not have been included in a film

 

I agree with Rope screenwriter Arthur Laurents that the murder should not have been shown. It would have been a lot more interesting for the audience to slowly realize what this odd pair did, and where the body is.

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I know I have many, but only one comes to mind, because I saw it last night on FXM. The movie was the sub-par The Day Mars Invaded Earth, a copy of the wonderful Invaders Of The Body Snatchers. The cast included Kent Taylor and Marie Windsor, whom I assume were actors. Kent appeared to be suffering from the coat hanger in the jacket syndrome.

 

Usual poppycock, beings from Mars just dying to take over the most boring family in the world and expecting to do what I don't know because the dialogue was too boring to listen to.

 

What they SHOULDNA done, was the ending. The crytic drive away of the family should have ended with a question mark on the screen, as they used to do in days of old, i.e., the 1950s. Instead................spoilers if you are going to watch this drek.................

 

 

they showed the burned to cinder outlines of each member of the family in the empty swimming pool, which then mysteriously filled with water. As if the cops were going to make an effort on that case.

 

Unnecessarily brutal and depressing. Well, at least they didn't kill the dog. Oh wait, that's right, they didn't have a dog. ;)

 

BTW, the film was shot at the Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills. Built by oil tycoon Edward Doheny (nope, never heard of him either) and gifted to his son and family, Ned, who promptly shot his lover Hugh and himself four months after moving in. Turned out okay for his wife though. The house and grounds, all 16 acres, are gorgeous. Amazingly, it still stands.

 

Finally, I like your use of the word SHOULDNA. :D 

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BTW, the film was shot at the Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills. Built by oil tycoon Edward Doheny (nope, never heard of him either)

 

He passed me at Doheny then I started to swerve,

But I pulled her out and there we were --

At Dead Man's Curve...

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I know I have many, but only one comes to mind, because I saw it last night on FXM. The movie was the sub-par The Day Mars Invaded Earth, a copy of the wonderful Invaders Of The Body Snatchers. The cast included Kent Taylor and Marie Windsor, whom I assume were actors. Kent appeared to be suffering from the coat hanger in the jacket syndrome.

 

Usual poppycock, beings from Mars just dying to take over the most boring family in the world and expecting to do what I don't know because the dialogue was too boring to listen to.

 

What they SHOULDNA done, was the ending. The crytic drive away of the family should have ended with a question mark on the screen, as they used to do in days of old, i.e., the 1950s. Instead................spoilers if you are going to watch this drek.................

 

 

they showed the burned to cinder outlines of each member of the family in the empty swimming pool, which then mysteriously filled with water. As if the cops were going to make an effort on that case.

 

Unnecessarily brutal and depressing. Well, at least they didn't kill the dog. Oh wait, that's right, they didn't have a dog. ;)

 

BTW, the film was shot at the Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills. Built by oil tycoon Edward Doheny (nope, never heard of him either) and gifted to his son and family, Ned, who promptly shot his lover Hugh and himself four months after moving in. Turned out okay for his wife though. The house and grounds, all 16 acres, are gorgeous. Amazingly, it still stands.

 

Finally, I like your use of the word SHOULDNA. :D 

RE: Greystone mansion and Doheny

Wasn't there someone on here years ago who was related to that family? vecchiolarry maybe? I can't remember, but they used to tell wonderful stories about encounters with old Hollywood stars...

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Back to the original topic--I've always felt that they botched the endings to both Witness for the Prosecution and Suspicion.  

 

SPOILERS::

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Witness should have ended with Dietrich's line "I knew he was guilty," and left out all of the nonsense with the other woman and the second muder. The original Christie short story ended that way. I read that it always bothered her that Vole got away with the original murder, so when she did it up as a play, she tacked on the ending that made him pay for his crime. I guess the production code probably wouldn;t have allowed for that ending either, but still...

 

I think Hitchcock should have gone with the original ending for Suspicion, and public opinion of Grant be d*mned. I didn;t want her to just let him kill her, like in the book, because that was just wrong--Joan Fontaine is too strong to be an intentional victim--there needs to be some character growth (like letting her eventually grow a spine?) But letting herself be used as bait to catch him--that might have been interesting. Or having the struggle on the cliff end with him   going over the edge and her never knowing whether she'd been right or not...Having the whole thing be Lina's imagination ruined the film for me. Besides Cary Grant has this slightly ambiguous, slick quality about him that would have made him perfect, had Hitchcock decided to go that way. (Which I think was the original plan? But the studio--or someone--nixed it)

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RE: Greystone mansion and Doheny

Wasn't there someone on here years ago who was related to that family? vecchiolarry maybe? I can't remember, but they used to tell wonderful stories about encounters with old Hollywood stars...

Really? How cool.

 

I was asking about vecchiolarry recently, I hope he's okay.

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Agree 100% re WFTP (1957).

 

Re Suspicion (1941)--I like Hitchcock's hybrid ending that went unused.  In it, Fontaine drank the poisoned milk, than asked Grants' character to"Oh, mail this for me please, Johnny"  It's a letter in which she has outlined all her suspicions and proof and is for her parents to pass to the police.  Last shot of film was to be Johnny (Grant) whistling as he drops the letter in a mailbox.  Predictably, RKO had a fit over the proposed ending and didn't use it.

 

A film which The Hays Office tried to ruin:  It's in the Noir course, but has already aired, so I'll name it.  The Letter (1940) was a triumph of outwitting the censors.  It's 1929 version ended properly on one line.  Thanks to The Hays Office, remake didn't end there, but was extremely well done anyway.  You can tell the line where film should end.  It implies everlasting mental torment for all concerned.  

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Agree 100% re WFTP (1957).

 

Re Suspicion (1941)--I like Hitchcock's hybrid ending that went unused.  In it, Fontaine drank the poisoned milk, than asked Grants' character to"Oh, mail this for me please, Johnny"  It's a letter in which she has outlined all her suspicions and proof and is for her parents to pass to the police.  Last shot of film was to be Johnny (Grant) whistling as he drops the letter in a mailbox.  Predictably, RKO had a fit over the proposed ending and didn't use it.

 

A film which The Hays Office tried to ruin:  It's in the Noir course, but has already aired, so I'll name it.  The Letter (1940) was a triumph of outwitting the censors.  It's 1929 version ended properly on one line.  Thanks to The Hays Office, remake didn't end there, but was extremely well done anyway.  You can tell the line where film should end.  It implies everlasting mental torment for all concerned.  

RE The Letter--I know the line! And I agree!

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Agree 100% re WFTP (1957).

 

Re Suspicion (1941)--I like Hitchcock's hybrid ending that went unused.  In it, Fontaine drank the poisoned milk, than asked Grants' character to"Oh, mail this for me please, Johnny"  It's a letter in which she has outlined all her suspicions and proof and is for her parents to pass to the police.  Last shot of film was to be Johnny (Grant) whistling as he drops the letter in a mailbox.  Predictably, RKO had a fit over the proposed ending and didn't use it.

 

A film which The Hays Office tried to ruin:  It's in the Noir course, but has already aired, so I'll name it.  The Letter (1940) was a triumph of outwitting the censors.  It's 1929 version ended properly on one line.  Thanks to The Hays Office, remake didn't end there, but was extremely well done anyway.  You can tell the line where film should end.  It implies everlasting mental torment for all concerned.  

RE Suspicion--That ending would have been great! Stupid RKO.

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