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TV Movies You'd Like to see on TCM ... once in a while


Bogie56
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    Here are a few TVM's I bought on tape years ago and the video company that released them:            

 

DOOMSDAY FLIGHT, The (1966-Tvm)  C-100m.  MCA Home Video

 

NIGHT GALLERY (1969-Tvm)  C-98m.  Pilot movie to the series with 3 story segments.  MCA Home Video

 

SILENT NIGHT, LONELY NIGHT (1969-Tvm)  C-98m.  MCA Home Video

 

MY SWEET CHARLIE (1970-Tvm) C-97m.  MCA Home Video

 

EXECUTION OF PRIVATE SLOVIK, The (1974-Tvm) C-100m.  MCA/Universal Home Video

 

RIDING WITH DEATH (1976-Tvm) This was a cut-and-paste job from 2 television episodes of a failed series called "The Gemini Man" and put together to be aired as a Tv movie.  MCA Home Video was kind enough to release it to the public.  Aww shucks!

 

ULTIMATE IMPOSTOR, The (1979-Tvm)  C-97m.  Busted series pilot.  MCA Home Video

 

RED LIGHT STING, The (1984-Tvm) C-100m.  MCA Home Video

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I remember "Go Ask Alice".  It was another ABC Movie of the Week offering.  That series really put out some good stuff on Tuesday nights in the early '70's!  Everyone in school seemed to be talking about it the next day.

 

 

 

Is GO ASK ALICE based on the book by the same name?

 

The book was supposedly the diary or journal of a girl but it was later exposed as a work of fiction.

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Apparently, any publication at all is permitted to put on its cover, "A True Story", whether it is or isn't.

 

That's what happened with the novel that the movie was based upon.

 

I guess most of our weekly trash publications - "The National Midnite Star Enquirer" - couldn't exist without that allowability.

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The Longest Night (1972) with David Janssen and James Farentino was a pretty good TVM.

 

I saw this on a CBS Lat Nighte movie, IIRC. I still remember one bit

 

[WARNING: If you are easily frightened by text descriptions, do not read any further]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

that gives me the shivers all these years later. The girl wakes up in the coffin and reads the note from the kidnapper: "Do not try to dig your way out. If you do, you run the risk of being eaten by ants."

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Andy Griffith had some TV movies where he played a real

bastard and he did so very effectively. 

 

Actually in the decade before Return To Mayberry and Matlock Griffith mostly shot busted pilots and played heavies. Some worked, like the Most Dangerous Game variation Savages; others worked only a kitsch level, like his biker in the cult classic Pray for The Wildcats.

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I would almost pay money to see Andy as a biker. Almost.

I believe he had a series not that long after the first one

left the air where he played a school principal or something.

It didn't last very long. He was good at playing villains. Wonder

how much that had to do with so many people being most

familiar with him as good old Sheriff Taylor.

 

Marjoe Gortner, who co-starred with AG in that biker film Pray For The Wildcats (the gang was made up of -- I swear I'm not making this up -- Marjoe, Andy, William Shatner, and Robert Reed) gave an interview to a website about making the film in Mexico. He liked his female co-stars Janet Margolin and Angie Dickinson, and got along well with the other actress, Lorraine Gary (who thanks to being married to Universal bigwig Sidney Shamberg would become a semi-star the next year in Jaws).

 

But he was shocked by how difficult Andy Griffith was on the set. Even in 1974, there were stories going around about "Shat", so Shatner's behavior did not surprise him. But Griffith being so uncooperative was totally unexpected.

 

All he remembered about Reed is that he hit on every male production assistant on the set.

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How about The Last Seduction (1994) a Neo Noir erotic thriller film directed by John Dahl, and features Linda Fiorenrino, Peter Berg, and Bill Pullman.  Fiorentino's performance generated talk of an Oscar nomination, but she was ineligible because the film was shown on HBO before it was released to theatres. The film was produced by ITC Entertainment and distributed by October Films.

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How about The Last Seduction (1994) a Neo Noir erotic thriller film directed by John Dahl, and features Linda Fiorenrino, Peter Berg, and Bill Pullman.  Fiorentino's performance generated talk of an Oscar nomination, but she was ineligible because the film was shown on HBO before it was released to theatres. The film was produced by ITC Entertainment and distributed by October Films.

I was always under the impression that The Last Seduction was a bonafide theatrical feature so this is news, thanks.   Fiorentino certainly made an impression with that film and as you say, too bad it was then ineligible under the Los Angeles Academy rules.

I'm sure there are plenty of examples that films that started out as tv mow's that gained subsequent theatrical release abroad, if not in the U.S.

Bergman's Scenes From a Marriage (1973) started out as a tv mini series in his native Sweden but played over here as a theatrical feature and the NYC Film Critics and BAFTA didn't let it bother them when they handed out the theatrical feature awards.

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How about The Last Seduction (1994) a Neo Noir erotic thriller film directed by John Dahl, and features Linda Fiorenrino, Peter Berg, and Bill Pullman.  Fiorentino's performance generated talk of an Oscar nomination, but she was ineligible because the film was shown on HBO before it was released to theatres. The film was produced by ITC Entertainment and distributed by October Films.

 

I don't consider movies made for cable - like HBO - to be the same as movies made for tv.

 

Movies made for tv were from approx 1964-1989. Then, for all intents and purposes, the networks discontinued producing "movies" as they found they were at too great a content disadvantage against premium channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. Those premium producers, in addition to having far greater freedom of content, could create movies that did not have to be edited with commercial breaks in mind and are therefore legitimate movies - no different than theatrically run movies. I consider made for tv movies legitimate as well, but the commercial interruption consideration does make them uniquely identifiable.

 

The puritanical standards that ruled the airwaves for so long have turned out to be one of the primary causes of network contraction.

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A few made for TV movies/Mini Series I would like to see on TCM.

 

The Girl Most Likely to... (1973) with Stockard Channing and Ed Asner.

 

Same Time, Next Year (1978) with Ellen Burstyn Alan Alda.

 

Chiefs (1983) with Charlton Heston, based on the book by Stuart Woods.

 

Sybil (1976) with Sally Field and Joanne Woodward.

 

The Naked Civil Servant (1975) with John Hurt. And the sequel An Englishman In New York (2009).

 

Best wishes

Metairie Road

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A few made for TV movies/Mini Series I would like to see on TCM.

...

 

Same Time, Next Year (1978) with Ellen Burstyn Alan Alda.

...

 

Best wishes

Metairie Road

A fine film. I, too, wish TCM would show this one.

 

Paul McCartney & Wings did the original theme song for this, but it was not used - alas.

 

Video HERE

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A few made for TV movies/Mini Series I would like to see on TCM.

 

Same Time, Next Year (1978) with Ellen Burstyn Alan Alda.

 

 

Best wishes

Metairie Road

This may have been intended for television but I'm certain it had a theatrical release before its tv debut as Ellen Burstyn was nominated for an Oscar for this.  She wouldn't have been eligible otherwise.

I think if the tv mow exceeded expectations the studios sometimes did a limited theatrical release just for awards season.

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Bogie56:  What does the 'MOW' acronym stand for?  

 

     As for the actual TVM of "Brief Encounter" from '74 I've seen it twice.  Magnetic Video was kind enough to release it on video in 1981 and I was loopy enough to buy it 'used' 2 decades later cos I'd read the 'Below Average' / Leonard Maltin Guide review and wanted to see how bad it was -- or was not -- for myself.   

 

     If you've never seen it at least the script drops the word 'furtive' into the dialogue mix.  I cannot think of any other movie I've seen that has 'furtive' as part of its dialogue.  In fact, the write-up on the back of the old Mag. video box makes sure to use 'furtive' in its description.  That made my innards tingle with anticipation . . .  

-----------------------------------

     ALSO, here are 2 made-for-British-Tv telefilms you might like:

 

     Haunted - The Ferryman (1974)

 

  Poor Girl - A Ghost Story (1974)

 

     They both run about 52/53 minutes and were apparently made for a 1-hour time slot. 

 

    

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