Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
trsquare

Daily Dose of Darkness #6: Business is Getting Better (Scene from Murder, My Sweet)

Recommended Posts

Marlowe acts as if he is from the streets. He knows what's going on and he is down with it. He is not letting anyone pull the wool over his eyes or run a game on him.He knows the way criminals act,  think, and behave. he talks that talk and walks that walk .Frank describes this as being on the fringes of the law and Marlowe is.

Marlowe is the main character of this story. Frank calls him the protagonist. He is not just a mechanism but we are following him as he interacts with the people in the story. He is not like those sauve and debonair detectives from the thirties, like a Nick Charles. Marlowe is something new and more realistic. He can be charming and knows his way around a woman but that not the way he perceives himself that is just one facet of his multi faceted personality.

These stories were written by men who told the stories based on the world as they perceived it to be. Not from some fantasy world but how these people would act in real life.Frank wrote about this new phenomenon in his article. The American dream was starting to be unattainable for a lot of people.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting busier and busier every day, I'm gonna have to get up earlier to jump in the conversation.

 

I just watched Murder, My Sweet last week for the third time in my life. This time I took notes, and I'm still a bit shaky on how some of the characters are related and what their true motivations are. This movie's plot is, shall we say, convoluted. But I'll give it this; it holds on to its secrets.

 

Yes, there are many instances of Marlowe acting unusual in this clip. For one; Marlowe seems to have very little interest in actually helping people, which seems odd for a man who's entire job description might as well be 'help people with their problems.' From the first shot in this scene look at how he interacts with the elevator operator, who's trying to talk to him. He borrows his pencil and shoves it back into his pocket without even looking at him. He treats Ann Grayle brusquely from the beginning, cutting her off midsentence to bark questions at her, he covertly locks the office door behind her so she can't run, then he assaults her and rifles through her purse. He's acting more like a hood than a detective. Contrast this with Sam Spade in the Maltese Falcon, who's similarly gruff and cynical, but is nowhere near as misanthropic. 

The only thing separating this Marlowe from the gangsters he goes after is that he seems to have realized he can be as violent as he wants if he goes after the right people. And this is the perfect representation of the noir anti-hero, maybe the single purest example of the nihilism, cynicism and all around distrust of the world until Ralph Meeker's Mickey Spilane, where that film decides to present the character without pretending that he's got a heart of gold underneath. Noir is about shadows, and the ugliness under everything, and this iteration of Phillip Marlowe represent that perfectly.

Not for nothing do I sympathize with Moose more than anyone else whenever I watch this film.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The character Phillip Marlowe is interesting in that the boundaries between good and bad are blurred. While he has the observation and deduction skills of a Sherlock Holmes, he also has a hardened attitude similar to a criminal. His methods for obtaining information are unusual, and as one user already pointed out, probably illegal, as he goes through the woman's bag when he suspects her of lying.

 

I'm reminded of an exchange in L.A. Confidential between Dudley Smith (James Cromwell) and Ed Exley (Guy Pearce):

 

Dudley Smith is basically describing the Hard-Boiled Detective trope seen in characters such as Phillip Marlowe and Bud White in L.A. Confidential.

Agreed on both counts -- I would also include the behavior is to serve a sort of ethical code.  Usually, it came down to valuing men over women and ultimately finding a sort of justice in which the guilty parties were punished int he end.  Dudley Smith is killed, Brigid O'Shaughnessy is arrested at the end of Maltese Falcon, Cagney gets his in White Heat, etc.  I have not seen all of Murder, My Sweet yet, but I would be surprised if the same doesn't follow through.  

 

The moral code must be upheld.  In the brutal reality of the film noir world, the ends justify the means.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's wrong to make comparisons but while watching Powell as Marlowe I keep picturing Bogart in this role wondering if I'd like it better but in the end Dick Powell grew on me. I think he brings more humor and a smiling face than Bogart's smirk...which has its place.

 

Funny, I just compared him to Bogart as well, or at least to Bogart's version of Sam Spade. I think for what this character does Dick Powell is better than Bogart would have been. Powell is able to imbue him with more disdain for humanity and make him more of a slimeball at times. Bogart, I think, would have softened the edges a bit just by nature of his onscreen charisma.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marlowe breaks the detective mold by wanting to stand out.  He's not going to melt into the background.  Before film noir, detectives were traditionally a piece of wallpaper, only breaking out occasionally to ask a question that they were too dumb to answer themselves.  (James Gleason in the Hildegarde Withers series comes to mind.)  Marlowe has his own mind and is his own person, and he's not going to let anyone forget it.

He's assured in himself.  When the elevator operator slings a joke at his expense, Marlowe ignores it, rather than waste his energy needlessly defending himself.  He doesn't bat an eye when he sees who's in his office; of course a beautiful girl would come to him.  But he's not so self-assured as to be egotistical; he has questions and needs answers, and he's not above asking the girl what she knows.

Marlowe doesn't balk at using a hard edge when dealing with the "weaker sex".  She's lying to him, and he knows it.  So he treats her the same way he'd treat a male liar.  Lock the door so she can't get out before he gets the answers he wants.  Instead of playing cat and mouse, waiting for her to drop the charade on her own, he confronts her, dumping her purse and rummaging through the contents while she watches helplessly.  He grabs her hands and holds them, in a controlling manner.  Certainly not gentlemanly treatment, as other male characters of the time would do.  His point is that this is his turf, his case, and this little two-bit dame isn't going to use him for her own gains.  He is his own man, and the sooner she learns that, the better.

In his treatment of the girl, he throws us off.  This is not what we expect from a detective or male protagonist.  We're immediately intrigued by this guy, with his hard edge and unexpected demeanor.  It is the unexpectedness (is that a word?) that we expect as a major ingredient in film noir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this early scene of the film Murder, My Sweet, Ann Grayle pretends to be a reporter in order to fool Phillip Marlowe into giving up information about a jade necklace connected to a murder. Aside from simple panning and tracking, there are no fancy camera, lighting, or composition tricks. It's a simple scene, focusing on a less simple element: the dialogue.

 

There's a particular kind of dialogue which is a hallmark of the Noir style. It's fast-paced, witty, often sarcastic, and meticulously written. It's not stilted or pretentious, but not as realistic as other styles. It can only be described as tight. Often, the people talking are on equal footing, rather than one putting another down, even when one of them is clearly supposed to be in the wrong.

 

It's demonstrated perfectly here, where Marlowe picks apart Grayle's story about being a reporter, while the two trade barbs.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting busier and busier every day, I'm gonna have to get up earlier to jump in the conversation.

 

I just watched Murder, My Sweet last week for the third time in my life. This time I took notes, and I'm still a bit shaky on how some of the characters are related and what their true motivations are. This movie's plot is, shall we say, convoluted. But I'll give it this; it holds on to its secrets.

 

Yes, there are many instances of Marlowe acting unusual in this clip. For one; Marlowe seems to have very little interest in actually helping people, which seems odd for a man who's entire job description might as well be 'help people with their problems.' From the first shot in this scene look at how he interacts with the elevator operator, who's trying to talk to him. He borrows his pencil and shoves it back into his pocket without even looking at him. He treats Ann Grayle brusquely from the beginning, cutting her off midsentence to bark questions at her, he covertly locks the office door behind her so she can't run, then he assaults her and rifles through her purse. He's acting more like a hood than a detective. Contrast this with Sam Spade in the Maltese Falcon, who's similarly gruff and cynical, but is nowhere near as misanthropic. 

The only thing separating this Marlowe from the gangsters he goes after is that he seems to have realized he can be as violent as he wants if he goes after the right people. And this is the perfect representation of the noir anti-hero, maybe the single purest example of the nihilism, cynicism and all around distrust of the world until Ralph Meeker's Mickey Spilane, where that film decides to present the character without pretending that he's got a heart of gold underneath. Noir is about shadows, and the ugliness under everything, and this iteration of Phillip Marlowe represent that perfectly.

Not for nothing do I sympathize with Moose more than anyone else whenever I watch this film.

As I have said, I haven't seen all of Murder, My Sweet yet, so I will have to wait to see all of what Marlowe does.  I do sense, at this point, a bit of misanthropy in Sam Spade -- will it be to the extent as Marlowe?  I will have to see.  Spade seems just as distrusting of O'Shaughnessy as Marlowe is of Grayle.  He even tells her so much to her face -- we didn't believe you, we believed your $200; oh, you're good, the way you get that tremble in your throat when you say 'help me, Mr. Spade'; the way he has to defend his innocence to the police, the implied affair with his late partner's wife.  While Spade may not "lay-hands" on his client to coerce her identity (as seen in this clip at least), Spades distaste seems different only in presentation.  He is just as conniving.

 

I will be interested to see if 1) Spade and Marlowe are very different in their fundamental character types, 2) if the moral code is as strong with Marlowe as it is with Spade.

 

Thanks for the thought to consider.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Philip Marlowe has a physical, hands-on approach with clients and others he deals with, even with the ladies.  For him, solving the cases he is involved with is more than an intellectual game to demonstrate his superior powers of deduction (as with Sherlock Holmes and Inspector Lestrade, for example).  Like Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon, Marlowe has had a close enough involvement with a crime (the murder of Marriott) to have come under at least nominal suspicion by the police.  Marlowe alludes to this in the scene with Ann Grayle when he tells her his in interested in the jade because he would like to know “who, besides me, might have killed Marriott.”  This new kind of private detective is caught between the police on the one hand an array of criminals and duplicitous clients on the other.  He becomes a protagonist in the story because has a personal stake in identifying the criminals and keeping the police off his back.  Deep down in Marlowe there is a vein of basic integrity that can appeal to an American sense of fair play (“I’m just a small businessman in a very messy business, but I like to follow through on a sale.”), but that quality is encased in a hard-boiled exterior of cynicism, flexible morality, and a working man’s money-driven willingness to take risks.  With Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe added to Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade, this new type of private detective emerges more clearly as the perfect protagonist for film noir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the podcast regarding the Maltese Falcon, the moderators discussed the shifting loyalties of Sam Spade: how he would defend Bridgid to the end until he found she lied to him, and then he gave her up without a second thought. 

 

Marlowe, the bookend to Spade for "hard-boiled" detectives, also exhibits this type of behaviour, which, as already pointed out, is ungentlemanly and certainly a change from the standard social behaviour of a man towards a lady. I believe it was Eddie Muller who pointed out that there's a degree of misogyny in film noir, which is not surprising considering the prevalence of femme fatales. Anne Shirley may not be a femme fatale, but you can never trust a dame, and Marlow doesn't. He doesn't believe her and is not above getting rough to get what he needs to pursue his own agenda.

 

Looking at film noir as an ethos, the private detectives fit in quite well because, (again, as has been pointed out several times) they follow their own code of honour and behaviour, skirting right/wrong and lawful/unlawful and so are not bound by what the audience has come to accept as social convention and proper conduct. But that's the world they inhabit. A repetitive theme that seems to be emerging in our studies is that film noir is filled with people who have their own morals, and we watch while circumstances and individuals try to push these people into crossing their own moral line. In Scarlet Street, we saw how Edward G. Robinson was pushed by love into committing crimes he never would've done before. With Marlowe and Spade, we see them constantly dancing on the fence of their own moral boundaries and lines, sometimes falling on either side, depending on the circumstances and the individuals involved. They can go from being suave and charming to brutal if and when it suits them.

 

For me, film noir is a combination of a certain cinematic style that echoes the murky moral waters of the characters. Perhaps that's why the private detective is such a good fit, as he operates within his own world, motivated by nothing more than his own murky morality and sense of justice, which gives him the freedom in his behaviour that wouldn't be acceptable or appropriate for anyone else.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I have said, I haven't seen all of Murder, My Sweet yet, so I will have to wait to see all of what Marlowe does.  I do sense, at this point, a bit of misanthropy in Sam Spade -- will it be to the extent as Marlowe?  I will have to see.  Spade seems just as distrusting of O'Shaughnessy as Marlowe is of Grayle.  He even tells her so much to her face -- we didn't believe you, we believed your $200; oh, you're good, the way you get that tremble in your throat when you say 'help me, Mr. Spade'; the way he has to defend his innocence to the police, the implied affair with his late partner's wife.  While Spade may not "lay-hands" on his client to coerce her identity (as seen in this clip at least), Spades distaste seems different only in presentation.  He is just as conniving.

 

 

Yeah, Spade is just as cynical, I think, but in Bogart's portrayal it seems to be world weariness and overall guardedness because of his job. Marlowe, at least in this movie, struck me as more cruel, like he wanted to hurt people more than Spade did.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this early scene of the film Murder, My Sweet, Ann Grayle pretends to be a reporter in order to fool Phillip Marlowe into giving up information about a jade necklace connected to a murder. Aside from simple panning and tracking, there are no fancy camera, lighting, or composition tricks. It's a simple scene, focusing on a less simple element: the dialogue.

 

There's a particular kind of dialogue which is a hallmark of the Noir style. It's fast-paced, witty, often sarcastic, and meticulously written. It's not stilted or pretentious, but not as realistic as other styles. It can only be described as tight. Often, the people talking are on equal footing, rather than one putting another down, even when one of them is clearly supposed to be in the wrong.

 

It's demonstrated perfectly here, where Marlowe picks apart Grayle's story about being a reporter, while the two trade barbs.

 

Just a quick note: You might get more views for this if you post it in the official 'pinned' discussion near the top of the forum threads. I know they're trying to cut down on multiple posts for the same topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, Marlowe is a "new" kind of detective in that he not only observes, he acts. You'd never have seen Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot bend someone's wrist, dump her purse out and force answers out of her. Even William Powell's droll Nick Charles wouldn't do this (though the Nick Charles on the pages of Hammett's "The Thin Man" novel might very well have done so.)

 

There is an ends-justifying-means, gray-area behavior on display with the noir detective. He's clever and observant, but he's also no-nonsense and will act expediently to get the (thankfully, noble) results he's looking for. We the audience still see him as a hero because we know he's right, we wish we could be so bold and incisive, and because his snappy patter is so damned seductive. He can act brutally, but he's no brute.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, YES, Philip Marlowe!!!  His stories take place in Los Angeles, and some of the buildings are still there.  Even better was when one of the radio stories took place in Long Beach, where I grew up, and I knew the places they mentioned.

 

-- Describe some of the things Marlowe says or does that make him a new kind of private detective?  He's devious in how he gets his answers.  Opening the dame's purse because he doesn't trust her answers to find out exactly who she is, playing cat and mouse with her until he gets the answers HE wants.  He's not out to be nice or suave -- he doesn't trust anyone or anything.

 

-- Why do you think this kind of private detective fits so well within the film noir context? Film noir is idealized -- the women are always gorgeous, the men are rugged; life may not always end out perfectly, but, damn, they look good.  

 

-- In what ways can this scene from Murder, My Sweet be considered as an important contribution to the film noir style?  It shows that there is quite a caste difference between the opulance of the apartment in "Laura" and the seediness of Marlowe's office.  Bad things can happen to the rich and the struggling poor.

I guess another thing that bothers me with some of these films is that the females aren't considered worthy of being noticed if they're wearing glasses, but that's also part of the time period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny, I just compared him to Bogart as well, or at least to Bogart's version of Sam Spade. I think for what this character does Dick Powell is better than Bogart would have been. Powell is able to imbue him with more disdain for humanity and make him more of a slimeball at times. Bogart, I think, would have softened the edges a bit just by nature of his onscreen charisma.

 

Powell and Bogart were both great Marlowes, and I think mostly because they showed Marlowe's sense of humor.  Of course each did so in their own way.  The interesting thing is that they came to Marlowe from opposite directions.  Bogart was a tough guy on film (think Duke Manatee) who by the time he made The Big Sleep was probably not expected to have such an easy way with Marlowe's witty side.  Powell was a musical comedy star (42nd Street) who was not thought to be able to bring the goods with Marlowe's tough guy side.

 

This translated into two different interpretations of the character that both work for me.  I would give the edge to Powell, mostly because I liked his self deprecating smirk.  Bogart in The Big Sleep has several self effacing remarks, but you can tell he doesn't mean them.  He is just being a smart ace (which works, don't get me wrong).  But when Powell puts himself down in Murder, My Sweet, he is genuinely peeved at himself for getting into such a fix.  Maybe Bogart just seems a little too confident, while Powell doesn't really know if he is going to pull this off or not.  But again, I am nitpicking.  Both chracterizations are great and enjoyable.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marlowe's (Powell's) good looks are deceiving, first impression is this is an attractive man who is not

too bright. Marlowe (Bogart) gives the impression he would shoot you first and ask questions later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, this guy doesn't fit into the typical detective when I think of film noir... There is a sort of innocence to him.. Someone earlier mentioned a "babyface".

He at first let the female take over, by asking questions and him answering.. Then everything changed the minute he grabbed her hand and became immediately aggressive dumping out her bag.  A lot of the time the detective seems to fall for the beauty.. The femme fatale.  But not this guy.. He don't take no ****!  Although of course, I don't know what happens at the end.. Perhaps he ends up falling for her after all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, this guy doesn't fit into the typical detective when I think of film noir... There is a sort of innocence to him.. Someone earlier mentioned a "babyface".

He at first let the female take over, by asking questions and him answering.. Then everything changed the minute he grabbed her hand and became immediately aggressive dumping out her bag.  He don't take no ****!

 

I think Powell's popular image at the time of a comedic lead was what made his performance here so impressive. I disagree with your other claim, that he let's Ann Grayle take the lead. He interrupt her mid sentence once she starts talking, then when he figures he might be able to learn something from her he lets her talk while secretly locking her in his office so he can rifle through her purse. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the short clip of Murder, My Sweet, Marlowe appears polished, smug and quick-witted in comparison to say, Bogart's gritty and jaded Spade (whom I prefer). The scene shows the film noir bravado of the male/detective who is confident that he has one-up on the woman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marlowe is clever and wily.  He speaks like an everyday man who is not particularly interested in his work and is more than particularly interested in the opposite sex.  His speech pattern and body language show he has a relaxed attitude and astute mind.  He is intelligent but not overtly self-assured.

 

Marlowe fits well within the film noir context because like other detectives he has the hard boiled edge; he just doesn't show it unless it is absolutely necessary.

 

As an important contribution, this scene depicts Marlowe as an approachable fellow who gets along with others.  He has an affable nature and does not need to use the harsh, tough techniques to get information.  He is alone but not lonely.  He is honest and follows through to get the job done because he has integrity.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:wacko: argh, apologies for my multiple posts.. i obviously had some problems!

anyone know how to delete?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This film is new to me; however, I've read the novel (Farewell, My Lovely) and 5 other Chandler novels featuring Marlowe (The Long Goodbye is my favorite). How he is portrayed on film is similar to how he's portrayed in print.

 

He's a no nonsense type of detective who possesses a moral compass. He investigates a case and follows through simply because he wants to know the truth. He's not too interested in shaking dames down for their money for a high priced retainer (as we saw in Born to Kill). He is also strictly professional. His female clients are just that: clients. They are not potential love interests as is common in most detective films. He doesn't flirt with them, and he definitely doesn't fall for the femme fatale tricks. This is clearly demonstrated in this scene in which he man-handles his potential client to get to the truth. He doesn't fall for her charm. 

 

Another key attribute is that Marlowe is observant of others as well as introspective which works well in the film noir style. I feel noir is more character driven than plot driven and largely psychological, contributing to the notion that film noir is largely a commentary on the darker side of U.S. society.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:wacko: argh, apologies for my multiple posts.. i obviously had some problems!

anyone know how to delete?

 

I just had the same problem. I went to one of the multiple reposts and clicked 'report' underneath it. Then included a short explanation that I had accidentally reposted something three times. When I next came back to the thread there was only my original post. There's nothing we can do, but the TCM moderators seem to be on top of things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we must agree on one thing: Dick Powell isn't exactly Humphrey Bogart here, and for me Bogart will always be the one and only face I will associate to the character of Philip Marlowe (and also to Sam Spade... I can't help it!).

However, in this early scene of Edward Dmytryk's Murder, My Sweet, Powell shows the attitude one expects from this new type of detective borrowed from the hard-boiled detective fiction from the 30's: he's tough, he's clever, he's ironic; he acts fast, and reacts even faster (with violence if he feels the need); he doesn't give a damn about others' feelings; he knows humanity is rotten, and that he isn't different - neither do women; consequently, his normal way of behavior is synonim of arrogance, cynism and, of course, violence.

This somewhat contrasts with the figure of the detective of crime movies from precedent decades: as Nino Frank suggest, they would employ an "operatic" model of heroic protagonist that was able to, methodologically and successfully, solve a mystery for which he had been hired and that didn't directly concern him; from this first conception of the private detective as the key-character that searches and finds all the answers needed, film noir evolves to a new conception of crime fiction where the detective not only becomes implied in the crime his trying to solve (or latter discovers that he has been misguided and that he's actually trapped in an even more complex intrigue), but actually he is agent and actor of these criminal webs, forced to act on the edge of society, law and morality.

Only within the exceptional context of film noir would the studio system of Hollywood cinema accept to give the audience this kind of stories, allowing the viewer to identify with characters of dubious personalities. 

In this early scene of Murder, My Sweet, Dick Powell reveals himself as suspicious (as we seen him locking his office's door), hot-blooded (precipitating his conclusions about the girl's intentions and almost assaulting her) and provocative (since the first moment we feel the sexual tension between the two of them). It's in this sense that we can understand the presence of hard-boiled detectives such as Philip Marlowe as the protagonists of Hollywood detective films, since only in a film-noir we could have this kind of "anti-hero", usually an outsider whose behavior doesn't fit the social rules, hardened by life's circumstances and traps.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading many of these posts, I did a bit of research on the private detective, specifically the Pinkerton detective. For anyone who is interested, type in "Pinkerton" at the Wikipedia site, which gives a nice history of this agency. I didn't know that the agency is still in operation now as a Swiss subsidiary. But I knew that Dashiell Hammett was a Pinkerton operative. A lot of his writing is based on his experiences as a private eye.

 

But what does this have to do with Marlow? The Pinkertons have a somewhat shady history. Many operatives infiltrated unions and were hired by big corporations to fight strikers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, so many workers would look with disdain on detectives in general. Perhaps that's why the elevator operator in Murder, My Sweet seems so sarcastic in his exchange with Marlowe: Marlowe is usually hired to do someone else's "dirty work."

 

I bet it would have taken a freelance detective a long time to set up a business in direct competition with the Pinkertons and with local law enforcement. I wonder about turf wars, for example. A private detective was probably considered a shady occupation from the start, which is perfect for film noir. But did it take Hammett's fiction to bring it to the attention of the public as a form of entertainment? I would think so, considering that most detective work is done in secret.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this scene Marlowe seems more world weary. Particularly the way he handles Ann Grayle and grabs in order to get to her. I didn't get the sense that he was innocent but that he has a moral code. That code includes trying to do good and not letting emotion get in the way. To me it added to his past saying that he was burned by a female client once for being too soft and now he will not get burned again for showing emotion. Others have also said that he has more "disdain for humanity" yet I disagree. He knows the world is rotten to the core yet he tries to do what he feels is good. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...