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Is Ladies in Retirement a Cult Classic?


alliehharding
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Made in 1941 by Columbia Pictures and remade very poorly in 1969 by the same this has everything, comedy, crime, drama and psychological thriller, This is Ida Lupino at her best. Her career spanned from 1931 to 1978 as a actress 105 credits, director 41 credits, writer 8 and producer 2. If not a cult classic then it's an essential. 

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Made in 1941 by Columbia Pictures and remade very poorly in 1969 by the same this has everything, comedy, crime, drama and psychological thriller, This is Ida Lupino at her best. Her career spanned from 1931 to 1978 as a actress 105 credits, director 41 credits, writer 8 and producer 2. If not a cult classic then it's an essential. 

 

I'll keep a watch out for GET-TV to show this film.   They show a lot of Columbia films and I have seen a few other Columbia films like The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt with Warren William,  and The Lady and the Mob with Fay Banner.     Of course TCM shows mostly films from her Warner contract years.

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For those asking, so when is TCM going to show this, it sounds very good? Thanks, ahharding, for the post.

 

 

Ladies in Retirement  |  

PLAYING ON TCM: 16-JUN-15 09:45 PM

Cast: Ida Lupino, Louis Hayward, Evelyn Keyes.

Dir: Charles Vidor.

Details: Suspense/Mystery | Black and White | 92 mins.

 

Thanks for the tip!     Next Tuesday and prime time as well. 

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I'll keep a watch out for GET-TV to show this film.   They show a lot of Columbia films and I have seen a few other Columbia films like The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt with Warren William,  and The Lady and the Mob with Fay Banner.     Of course TCM shows mostly films from her Warner contract years.

TCM.also shows MGM, and some RKO and Columbia films, with a smattering of movies from elsewhere.

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TCM.also shows MGM, and some RKO and Columbia films, with a smattering of movies from elsewhere.

 

You may have missed that my post was about TCM's showing of Ida Lupino films ("her Warner contract years").    So yes, while TCM shows movies from all studios,   if a star was under contract at WB or MGM,   most of the films TCM will show for that star will be from those studios (of course depending on how long said star was under contract).         

 

Something similar is true for MOVIES-TV and GET-TV but with different studios (Fox and Columbia).     e.g.  I have seen Bette Davis on these stations but I don't recall ever seeing a WB Davis film on them.

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I don't know if it's a cult classic, or even an essential, but I really enjoy this offbeat movie. I have recorded it before, onto vhs from AMC, and dvd from TCM. The cast is great. I hope to watch it "live"..

I also recorded Ladies In Retirement when it was shown on TCM. I wouldn't exactly call it a cult classic, but I agree, it's an offbeat film that I also enjoyed.

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You may have missed that my post was about TCM's showing of Ida Lupino films ("her Warner contract years"). So yes, while TCM shows movies from all studios, if a star was under contract at WB or MGM, most of the films TCM will show for that star will be from those studios (of course depending on how long said star was under contract).

 

Something similar is true for MOVIES-TV and GET-TV but with different studios (Fox and Columbia). e.g. I have seen Bette Davis on these stations but I don't recall ever seeing a WB Davis film on them.

Sorry, yes I guess I missed that. What would be really nice is if TCM would show the films that Lupino did at.Fox in the early 40s: MOONTIDE, LIFE BEGINS.AT.EIGHT-THIRTY, or later, ROADHOUSE (I believe TCM has shown ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES). All are above average dramas with winning performances by Ida,.and only the first and last (coincidentally both noirish) have aired on FMC in the last.couple of years or so.
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Sorry, yes I guess I missed that. What would be really nice is if TCM would show the films that Lupino did at.Fox in the early 40s: MOONTIDE, LIFE BEGINS.AT.EIGHT-THIRTY, or later, ROADHOUSE (I believe TCM has shown ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES). All are above average dramas with winning performances by Ida,.and only the first and last (coincidentally both noirish) have aired on FMC in the last.couple of years or so.

 

Yes, more Fox 40s films is something I wish for as well.    MOVIES-TV shows Moontide fairly often so I have seen this but I don't recall them showing Road House and that is a film I really want to see again.   First rate cast with Widmark, Ida, and Holm.   (even Cornel Wilde isn't too bland in that one).

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I'm another fan of LADIES IN RETIREMENT and just about all of Ida Lupino's performances. I believe that TCM has shown ROAD HOUSE, although not recently. Ida Lupino probably isn't one of the first stars who leads you to classic films, but for some of us, once we discover her work, she becomes one of our very favorites.

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Watched Ladies In Retirement.   Fine acting and it was a well produced movie.   One thing is that there really wasn't any character in the film that was very likeable,  except Albert to some degree,  the charming cad.   Ellen was cold and not very appealing,  along with the fact that she was a murderer.    

 

Lanchester was a treat (as usual) but she and her sister were annoying characters. The Landlady just wasn't mean enough to support the idea, in my mind's eye,  of her being killed.   As she said those two crazy gals weren't family and who would want to live in a house with them.   After the killing I had no sympathy and wanted her to be exposed.      

 

I assume the production code enforcers were told by the producers Ellen dies in the fog laden fields.  

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I'm another fan of LADIES IN RETIREMENT and just about all of Ida Lupino's performances. I believe that TCM has shown ROAD HOUSE, although not recently. Ida Lupino probably isn't one of the first stars who leads you to classic films, but for some of us, once we discover her work, she becomes one of our very favorites.

That's why I still think Ida Lipino and this film has the markings of a cult classic. She has her following or fans because she is different from the average stars of her period. She's more complex and multi dimensional for one thing. But it's hard to put a finger on what makes her stand out from Crawford, Davis or Hayward but she does. And this was her favorite roll of all the films she did as Robert said so that says something about the film. 

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Watched Ladies In Retirement.   Fine acting and it was a well produced movie.   One thing is that there really wasn't any character in the film that was very likeable,  except Albert to some degree,  the charming cad.   Ellen was cold and not very appealing,  along with the fact that she was a murderer.    

 

Lanchester was a treat (as usual) but she and her sister were annoying characters. The Landlady just wasn't mean enough to support the idea, in my mind's eye,  of her being killed.   As she said those two crazy gals weren't family and who would want to live in a house with them.   After the killing I had no sympathy and wanted her to be exposed.      

 

I assume the production code enforcers were told by the producers Ellen dies in the fog laden fields.  

 

James -  I didn't see Ellen as cold in the beginning - she was desperate to take care of her sisters, who were being put out of their current home.  That was clear to me when she asked her employer if her sisters could visit for a time.  She was practically begging, while remaining as dignified as she could.

 

When she decided to resolve things as she did, she turned seemingly cold very quickly.  That was the only way she could stick to her plan and story.  Albert was a charmer - it was fun to watch Ida and Louis Hayward play against each other, knowing that in real life they were married to each other.  I've always liked him.

 

In the end, the two sisters would most likely end up in the very place that Ellen (Ida) feared that they would have to go to, since she was no longer there to protect them.

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James -  I didn't see Ellen as cold in the beginning - she was desperate to take care of her sisters, who were being put out of their current home.  That was clear to me when she asked her employer if her sisters could visit for a time.  She was practically begging, while remaining as dignified as she could.

 

When she decided to resolve things as she did, she turned seemingly cold very quickly.  That was the only way she could stick to her plan and story.  Albert was a charmer - it was fun to watch Ida and Louis Hayward play against each other, knowing that in real life they were married to each other.  I've always liked him.

 

In the end, the two sisters would most likely end up in the very place that Ellen (Ida) feared that they would have to go to, since she was no longer there to protect them.

 

I did have sympathy for Ellen at the start of the film and respect for her determination to honor her promise to her sisters.   Ida is great at playing a very determined character type (Devotion,  Out of the Fog and of course The Hard Way).    But once it became clear her only option was to murder the landlady I only wanted her to be caught.  

 

Of course maybe as a musician,  I just didn't like the fact Ellen killed that landlady while she was having fun playing her music!  :blink:   

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I did have sympathy for Ellen at the start of the film and respect for her determination to honor her promise to her sisters.   Ida is great at playing a very determined character type (Devotion,  Out of the Fog and of course The Hard Way).    But once it became clear her only option was to murder the landlady I only wanted her to be caught.  

 

Of course maybe as a musician,  I just didn't like the fact Ellen killed that landlady while she was having fun playing her music!  :blink:   

Boy, I really wanted to like this one as I am a huge Ida Lupino fan.  But, the whole thing left me cold.  And, I'm betting the marketing department decided to name the film:  "Ladies in Retirement" so it would sound like the plot was "fun with silly old ladies" rather than cold blooded killing and a couple of sisters who clearly need professional help.  Louis Hayward as a cad was kind of fun, though.

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I'd just like to know how Ida got the carcass into the "oven" all by herself.

I was going to respond, but decided to take a shower first.  I was going to say, as james said below - Ida played "a very determined character".  She would have figured out a way.

 

(I like my answer better! Next time, I'll respond before the shower.)

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Boy, I really wanted to like this one as I am a huge Ida Lupino fan.  But, the whole thing left me cold.  And, I'm betting the marketing department decided to name the film:  "Ladies in Retirement" so it would sound like the plot was "fun with silly old ladies" rather than cold blooded killing and a couple of sisters who clearly need professional help.  Louis Hayward as a cad was kind of fun, though.

 

In the TCM article that accompanies the movie, it states that in the original play, Ellen was supposed to be in her sixties.  In the movie, they tried to get Ida to look at least 40, although she was only 23 when she made this.

 

I had always wondered about the title "Ladies in Retirement".

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