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The Arizonan, not your usual oater.


slaytonf
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Sure, it has all your typical elements of a Western: town with a big bad boss, hero who rides in from the horizon, the reluctant sheriff, stagecoach robberies, themes of guns vs. the rule of law.  This has some things which distinguish it.  The dialog is well done.  It's direct, spare, understated, and, when it needs to be, hard.  Richard Dix is especially good in this environment.  It also has some crisp direction by Charles Vidor, best known, I suppose, for Gilda, who makes the conventional final shoot-out thoroughly unconventional.  The movie stumbles worst with the inclusion of a love triangle between the hero, his brother, and the woman between them.  All the people die who are supposed to, though sometimes in a surprising way, and the West is made safe for civilized people.  Good support from Margot Grahame, and Preston Foster.

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It's a noteworthy film because it shows a black woman -- played by an uncredited Etta McDaniel, Hattie's older sister -- avenging the callous murder of her fiancé (Willie Best).

 

Here's a TCM Featurette with comments by the eminent -- and now controversial -- Dr. William H. Cosby, Jr.:

 

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/135931/Bill-Cosby-on-Etta-McDaniel-A-TCM-Featurette-.html

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It's a noteworthy film because it shows a black woman -- played by an uncredited Etta McDaniel, Hattie's older sister -- avenging the callous murder of her fiancé (Willie Best).

 

Here's a TCM Featurette with comments by the eminent -- and now controversial -- Dr. William H. Cosby, Jr.:

 

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/135931/Bill-Cosby-on-Etta-McDaniel-A-TCM-Featurette-.html

 

I'm apparently not supposed to, but I still like the Cos.

 

I just can't seem to dismiss the 50 years of wonderful entertainment he's given to me. I used to lay in bed in the 60's and laugh in the dark listening to his marvellous comedy albums. And I always enjoyed the movies he made in the 70's.

 

Sorry - that has nothing to do with the western, but your post opened the subject of him now being "controversial".

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I'm apparently not supposed to, but I still like the Cos.

 

I just can't seem to dismiss the 50 years of wonderful entertainment he's given to me. I used to lay in bed in the 60's and laugh in the dark listening to his marvellous comedy albums. And I always enjoyed the movies he made in the 70's.

 

Sorry - that has nothing to do with the western, but your post opened the subject of him now being "controversial".

 

No problem! Your sentiments were well expressed and appreciated. But you could do a whole 

'nother thread on people we thought we knew, but really didn't (e.g. O.J. Simpson, Robert Blake). And you could do another one on people whose personal indiscretions caused them to die ugly (e.g. William Holden, David Carradine). Although the book isn't closed on Cosby's life and career yet, it appears -- sadly -- that he's going to be a controversial figure for a long time to come.

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No problem! Your sentiments were well expressed and appreciated. But you could do a whole 

'nother thread on people we thought we knew, but really didn't (e.g. O.J. Simpson, Robert Blake). And you could do another one on people whose personal indiscretions caused them to die ugly (e.g. William Holden, David Carradine). Although the book isn't closed on Cosby's life and career yet, it appears -- sadly -- that he's going to be a controversial figure for a long time to come.

 

For many, yes. But not for me.

 

I think I kinda knew Blake. Anyone who watched 'The Tonight Show' (and other talk shows) in the 70's knew he was a volatile and haunted personality.

 

Carradine was still interested in pleasure at the age of 70 something. So what? I can tell you it doesn't get any easier to attain when you start getting up in age.

 

I just think he was probably drunk at the time, so - whoops.

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I think I kinda knew Blake. Anyone who watched 'The Tonight Show' (and other talk shows) in the 70's knew he was a volatile and haunted personality.

 

 

 

 

I believe you're right on target with your assessment of Blake. He probably has never forgiven the Hollywood system for its treatment of child actors -- including himself and Bobby Driscoll -- when they became adolescents.

 

Still, it appears viewers loved Blake and his hipster persona during the 1970s, when "Baretta" was a popular television series. I wouldn't be surprised if he had a high "Q" rating in those days, as evidenced by his many STP commercials.

 

 

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While at The Rock Store(a motorcycle gathering place on Mulholland Hwy in the Santa Monica Mountains) on a few Sunday mornings I'd occasionally walk past Blake(a short and now somewhat frail lookin' guy) and during and right after his little "troubles". Never said anything to him at all, though.

 

But I DID come CLOSE a few times to walkin' up to the guy and askin' him the following question: "REALLY Bobby? 'I left my gun back inside the restaurant' was the BEST LINE you could come up WITH?! REALLY?!"

 

(...well, I guess it worked somehow. eh?!)

 

LOL

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