Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

We need more Richard Widmark films


MarshaKatz
 Share

Recommended Posts

Richard Widmark may be one of the greatest most underrated actors and I wish that TCM would program more of his films. I've been hoping that they would have Widmark featured in the Summer of Darkness or Summer Under The Stars festivals, but not yet. I've been told that due to his movies being made by Twentieth Century Fox they are not all available for TCM programming. Well, I would love to see as many Richard Widmark films as possible e.g. Night And The City (film noir), Panic In The Streets, Road House (film noir), Pickup on South Street (film noir), No Way Out, Yellow Sky (great Western film noir), Madigan, Backlash, The Last Wagon, Garden of Evil, Kiss of Death (Film Noir -- Great), Alvarez Kelly, Time Limit, Down to the Sea in Ships, the list goes on. Richard Widmark deserves being recognized as one of our finest  and diversified actors. Hopefully we'll see more Richard Widmark films on TCM.
 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Widmark may be one of the greatest most underrated actors and I wish that TCM would program more of his films. I've been hoping that they would have Widmark featured in the Summer of Darkness or Summer Under The Stars festivals, but not yet. I've been told that due to his movies being made by Twentieth Century Fox they are not all available for TCM programming. Well, I would love to see as many Richard Widmark films as possible e.g. Night And The City (film noir), Panic In The Streets, Road House (film noir), Pickup on South Street (film noir), No Way Out, Yellow Sky (great Western film noir), Madigan, Backlash, The Last Wagon, Garden of Evil, Kiss of Death (Film Noir -- Great), Alvarez Kelly, Time Limit, Down to the Sea in Ships, the list goes on. Richard Widmark deserves being recognized as one of our finest  and diversified actors. Hopefully we'll see more Richard Widmark films on TCM.

 

 

Yes,  more Richard Widmark and more 20th Century Fox contract stars in general.    

 

TCM does lease some of the films listed so hang in there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Widmark may be one of the greatest most underrated actors and I wish that TCM would program more of his films. I've been hoping that they would have Widmark featured in the Summer of Darkness or Summer Under The Stars festivals, but not yet. I've been told that due to his movies being made by Twentieth Century Fox they are not all available for TCM programming. Well, I would love to see as many Richard Widmark films as possible e.g. Night And The City (film noir), Panic In The Streets, Road House (film noir), Pickup on South Street (film noir), No Way Out, Yellow Sky (great Western film noir), Madigan, Backlash, The Last Wagon, Garden of Evil, Kiss of Death (Film Noir -- Great), Alvarez Kelly, Time Limit, Down to the Sea in Ships, the list goes on. Richard Widmark deserves being recognized as one of our finest  and diversified actors. Hopefully we'll see more Richard Widmark films on TCM.

 

Marsha, Marsha, Marsha...

 

Please don't talk all in bold

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Widmark is one of my favorite actors and he has been discussed on a number of threads on these boards. He was highly regarded by his peers as an "actor's actor" . While he was  never exactly  a major box office star having his name in the credits (usually near the top of the billing) would guarantee  an audience. Widmark always played interesting, complex  characters, often villains but also "flawed" heroes. Marsha mentions many of his more well known films, the first 7 years he was under contract to 20th Century Fox so there can be issues about availability to TCM. In the last few years TCM has been able to get some of those films, hopefully that will continue to be the case (a lot of other notable actors worked at Fox like Tyrone  Power, etc.)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Richard Widmark may be one of the greatest most underrated actors and I wish that TCM would program more of his films. I've been hoping that they would have Widmark featured in the Summer of Darkness or Summer Under The Stars festivals, but not yet. I've been told that due to his movies being made by Twentieth Century Fox they are not all available for TCM programming. Well, I would love to see as many Richard Widmark films as possible e.g. Night And The City (film noir), Panic In The Streets, Road House (film noir), Pickup on South Street (film noir), No Way Out, Yellow Sky (great Western film noir), Madigan, Backlash, The Last Wagon, Garden of Evil, Kiss of Death (Film Noir -- Great), Alvarez Kelly, Time Limit, Down to the Sea in Ships, the list goes on. Richard Widmark deserves being recognized as one of our finest  and diversified actors. Hopefully we'll see more Richard Widmark films on TCM.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes !  I say yes to anything Richard Widmarkian ! Not only a great actor, but a sexy one. (I know this opinion will not be shared by many, but it's mine. Opinion, that is.)

 

There was an energy to Widmark that few actors possessed. Good guy, bad guy, or - better yet, complex human character guided by both "good" and "bad" impulses - Richard Widmark's presence fairly jumped off the screen.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes !  I say yes to anything Richard Widmarkian ! Not only a great actor, but a sexy one. (I know this opinion will not be shared by many, but it's mine. Opinion, that is.)

 

There was an energy to Widmark that few actors possessed. Good guy, bad guy, or - better yet, complex human character guided by both "good" and "bad" impulses - Richard Widmark's presence fairly jumped off the screen.

 

Widmark's "problem" is that to much of the public who's even heard of him by this time, his Tommy Udo image is so permanently affixed in their minds that it crowds out everything else he did.  Like Robert Ryan, an equally gifted and underrated actor, the fact that he was so convincing in his psychopathic roles made him all too easy to typecast.

 

Since the first three Widmark films I ever saw were Kiss of Death, Night and the City, and No Way Out, I fell into that sort of trap myself.  But the movie that made me realize just how mistaken I'd been in my typecasting was Time Limit, a 1957 court-martial hearing drama involving a Korean War veteran (Richard Basehart, who's also perfectly cast) who's being tried for cooperating with North Korean propaganda efforts.  Since Basehart confesses and seemingly just wants to get the trial over with, Widmark (an investigating officer) could take the easy way out and please everyone, but instead he digs deeper and yada yada yada we get a powerful ending that turns our expectations upside down.   Widmark is so far removed from his psychopathic archetype role that he might as well be Spencer Tracy, though even Tracy himself couldn't have topped Widmark's performance.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Widmark's "problem" is that to much of the public who's even heard of him by this time, his Tommy Udo image is so permanently affixed in their minds that it crowds out everything else he did.  Like Robert Ryan, an equally gifted and underrated actor, the fact that he was so convincing in his psychopathic roles made him all too easy to typecast.

 

Since the first three Widmark films I ever saw were Kiss of Death, Night and the City, and No Way Out, I fell into that sort of trap myself.  But the movie that made me realize just how mistaken I'd been in my typecasting was Time Limit, a 1957 court-martial hearing drama involving a Korean War veteran (Richard Basehart, who's also perfectly cast) who's being tried for cooperating with North Korean propaganda efforts.  Since Basehart confesses and seemingly just wants to get the trial over with, Widmark (an investigating officer) could take the easy way out and please everyone, but instead he digs deeper and yada yada yada we get a powerful ending that turns our expectations upside down.   Widmark is so far removed from his psychopathic archetype role that he might as well be Spencer Tracy, though even Tracy himself couldn't have topped Widmark's performance.

Agreed, Andy.  As a young boy I also liked Widmark in the westerns and adventure films such as The Long Ships (1964) though they probably weren't films to trumpet anyone's acting abilities.

Two others I would mention for his solid performances are The Bedford Incident (1965) and Run For the Sun (1956) though they probably fall somewhere just behind the ones you have already mentioned.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Widmark's "problem" is that to much of the public who's even heard of him by this time, his Tommy Udo image is so permanently affixed in their minds that it crowds out everything else he did.  Like Robert Ryan, an equally gifted and underrated actor, the fact that he was so convincing in his psychopathic roles made him all too easy to typecast.

 

Since the first three Widmark films I ever saw were Kiss of Death, Night and the City, and No Way Out, I fell into that sort of trap myself.  But the movie that made me realize just how mistaken I'd been in my typecasting was Time Limit, a 1957 court-martial hearing drama involving a Korean War veteran (Richard Basehart, who's also perfectly cast) who's being tried for cooperating with North Korean propaganda efforts.  Since Basehart confesses and seemingly just wants to get the trial over with, Widmark (an investigating officer) could take the easy way out and please everyone, but instead he digs deeper and yada yada yada we get a powerful ending that turns our expectations upside down.   Widmark is so far removed from his psychopathic archetype role that he might as well be Spencer Tracy, though even Tracy himself couldn't have topped Widmark's performance.

 

Yes,  we all need to remember that in our own mind we can typecast an actor based on the movies we have seen to date.

 

I often find this when people fairly unfamiliar with studio-era movies say that Bette Davis is 'over the top'.   Then I find out the only movies they have seen are her two latter period semi-horror films or some of her very intense performances from the 40s like The Little Foxes.         

 

Widmark himself said that he didn't wish to do anymore characters like the one he played in No Way Out.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ons.of the ironic things about Widmark, who early on specialized on psychopaths, sociopaths, and just generally creepy characters, was nothing like that in real life. Shows what an amazing actor he was.

For many years in Ontario, Canada we had a show called Saturday Night at the Movies on public television (TVO) and it was hosted by Elwy Yost, the father of Graham Yost.

Once a year Elwy would do these junkets to LA to interview all of the old stars, screenwriters and cameramen, etc. and then they would play these clips in between the movies.  Most of these interviews were done right in the homes of the stars.

I caught his interview with Richard Widmark, and yes he seemed to be an incredibly well-grounded individual with none of the airs of a 'star.'

As an aside, TVO did not have the funds to store this treasure-trove of interviews so at some point it was all donated to the American Academy of Motion Pictures, the Oscars.

It would be great if TCM could get its hands on these interviews.  Some of my favourites were with Stanley Cortez, Lee Garmes, and Preston Sturges' secretary (Sturges dictated all his screenplays).  But he had all the biggies too like Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many years in Ontario, Canada we had a show called Saturday Night at the Movies on public television (TVO) and it was hosted by Elwy Yost, the father of Graham Yost.

Once a year Elwy would do these junkets to LA to interview all of the old stars, screenwriters and cameramen, etc. and then they would play these clips in between the movies.  Most of these interviews were done right in the homes of the stars.

I caught his interview with Richard Widmark, and yes he seemed to be an incredibly well-grounded individual with none of the airs of a 'star.'

 

This is notable as one of the very few TV interviews done by Widmark, who was notorious for his refusal to do TV talk shows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many years in Ontario, Canada we had a show called Saturday Night at the Movies on public television (TVO) and it was hosted by Elwy Yost, the father of Graham Yost.

Once a year Elwy would do these junkets to LA to interview all of the old stars, screenwriters and cameramen, etc. and then they would play these clips in between the movies.  Most of these interviews were done right in the homes of the stars.

I caught his interview with Richard Widmark, and yes he seemed to be an incredibly well-grounded individual with none of the airs of a 'star.'

As an aside, TVO did not have the funds to store this treasure-trove of interviews so at some point it was all donated to the American Academy of Motion Pictures, the Oscars.

It would be great if TCM could get its hands on these interviews.  Some of my favourites were with Stanley Cortez, Lee Garmes, and Preston Sturges' secretary (Sturges dictated all his screenplays).  But he had all the biggies too like Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc.

That would be amazing of TCM could.acquire and show these.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

His first screen role afforded him his only Oscar nomination ever. That is hard to believe considering he was such a good actor.

He was nominated for Best Supporting Acting for his role as Tommy Udo in Kiss of Death (1947). And from then on he was typecast in similar villainous or as the anti-hero in film noirs. Luckily for his fans he eventually branched out and ventured into westerns and dramatic roles where he excelled.

As far as I am concerned, he should have been Oscar nominated many more times, and I have to wonder why being such a gifted actor that he never was nominated again. Here are some of the films where he should have at least been honored with nominations:

Panic in the Streets (1950)
No Way Out (1950)
Pickup on South Street (1953)
Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)
The Bedford Incident (1964)

At the very least the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences could have at least given him an Honorary Oscar for his body of work before passing away at the ripe old age of 93 in 2008.

 

He is missed.

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know many people on these boards would object to this but Richard Widmark  did 6 made for tv movies based on the character of police detective Dan Madigan (from the feature film of the same name) and I would like to see TCM air these films sometime. The Madigan tv shows were part of the NBC mystery movie series that resulted in shows like Colombo, Banacek,  McCloud , McMillian and Wife, etc. All of these shows get run in syndication regularly but never the Widmark  series Madigan.  The show was only on for one season (6 episodes) and received high ratings from the public and critics. Its my understanding that the series could have gone on longer but Widmark declined to do more (our loss).  I think that the fact that only six shows were done makes it difficult to market them. And they have never been released on dvd/  vhs cassette, etc. TCM may be the only feasible  outlet for airing these shows.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many years in Ontario, Canada we had a show called Saturday Night at the Movies on public television (TVO) and it was hosted by Elwy Yost, the father of Graham Yost.

Once a year Elwy would do these junkets to LA to interview all of the old stars, screenwriters and cameramen, etc. and then they would play these clips in between the movies.  Most of these interviews were done right in the homes of the stars.

I caught his interview with Richard Widmark, and yes he seemed to be an incredibly well-grounded individual with none of the airs of a 'star.'

As an aside, TVO did not have the funds to store this treasure-trove of interviews so at some point it was all donated to the American Academy of Motion Pictures, the Oscars.

It would be great if TCM could get its hands on these interviews.  Some of my favourites were with Stanley Cortez, Lee Garmes, and Preston Sturges' secretary (Sturges dictated all his screenplays).  But he had all the biggies too like Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc.

 

"Saturday Night at the Movies !"   Yay Elwy Yost !  Loved that show !  (at least 3 exclamation points' worth.)

 

God, I saw so many great classic films for the first time on that wonderful show. Which was around many years before TCM came into being  (I'm in no way dissing TCM, which everyone here knows I love. I'm just saying, in its own humble way, Ontario's TVO did it first.)

 

I'm pretty sure it was on SNATM that I first saw Kiss of Death.  And Panic in the Streets.

 

I am very saddened to hear that TVO had to let go of all those Elwy Yost interviews. What a loss for the station and for Ontarians.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Saturday Night at the Movies !"   Yay Elwy Yost !  Loved that show !  (at least 3 exclamation points' worth.)

 

God, I saw so many great classic films for the first time on that wonderful show. Which was around many years before TCM came into being  (I'm in no way dissing TCM, which everyone here knows I love. I'm just saying, in its own humble way, Ontario's TVO did it first.)

 

I'm pretty sure it was on SNATM that I first saw Kiss of Death.  And Panic in the Streets.

 

I am very saddened to hear that TVO had to let go of all those Elwy Yost interviews. What a loss for the station and for Ontarians.

Yes, Elwy was certainly responsible for a great deal of my film education too.  No commercials too.  TVO had years and years worth of those great interviews.  Eddie Bracken, Dorothy Malone, Robert Stack.

I was blown away when he screened Touch of Evil in 1975.

And before Saturday Night at the Movies there was his Magic Shadows show.  I would rush home from school to watch that in the afternoon.  He would show about 20 minutes of a classic film each day with his armchair wraparound.  Films like King Kong, Last of the Mohicans and the Flash Gordon serials.

Did you know that Elwy had the job of laying all the AVRO Arrow workers off?  My father and two uncles lost their jobs on that day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For many years in Ontario, Canada we had a show called Saturday Night at the Movies on public television (TVO) and it was hosted by Elwy Yost, the father of Graham Yost.

Once a year Elwy would do these junkets to LA to interview all of the old stars, screenwriters and cameramen, etc. and then they would play these clips in between the movies.  Most of these interviews were done right in the homes of the stars.

I caught his interview with Richard Widmark, and yes he seemed to be an incredibly well-grounded individual with none of the airs of a 'star.'

As an aside, TVO did not have the funds to store this treasure-trove of interviews so at some point it was all donated to the American Academy of Motion Pictures, the Oscars.

It would be great if TCM could get its hands on these interviews.  Some of my favourites were with Stanley Cortez, Lee Garmes, and Preston Sturges' secretary (Sturges dictated all his screenplays).  But he had all the biggies too like Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc.

I once spent a half hour with a friend speaking to Elwy Yost in his TVOntario office. He was such a nice guy that, even though it was apparent that he had forgotten that we were coming, he welcomed us to join him anyway. He always felt that he should make himself accessible to his show's viewers, sometimes answering the phone himself when someone wanted to contact somebody regarding Saturday Night at the Movies.

 

He was the same affable movie fan in his office that he was on the air. Absolutely no pretensions about the man.

 

I recall a comment that he made about some negative feedback the station had received from the Chinese community regarding the racial stereotyping in Karloff's Mask of Fu Manchu, a movie they had broadcast. As a result of that he said they wouldn't broadcast it again. One oddity: Elwy had a producer that worked on the show with him named Risa Shuman. I gathered that she was a pretty dominant personality, and got the clear impression that Elwy was a bit intimdated by her. At one point as we were briefly discussing the lady she walked by his office door and I remember Elwy quickly puttting his index finger up to his mouth for fear that she might overhear us.

 

My friend and I gave Elwy a couple of video tape copies of films that he didn't have, Along Came Jones and Northern Pursuit. He appeared very appreciative.

 

At the end of our conversation, as we were getting ready to leave his office, Elwy invited us to come to his home some time to have a beer with him. Neither of us took the invitation very seriously at the time because we both thought that he was just being polite. My friend later made casual reference to the beer invite to a friend of Elwy's. That friend said that Elwy was a shy man so if he made the offer it was a genuine one.

 

Oh, well, at least we both got to meet "Uncle" Elwy one time and I can say it was a genuine pleasure. Three movie buffs talking about their favourite subject, old movies, but one of the buffs a well known Ontario TV personality.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...