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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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This is a sad loss for me.  I grew up loving Battlestar Galactica and Richard Hatch.  From personal experience,  he was an incredibly warm and down to earth person.   RIP ... you will be missed. :(

http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/celebrity/richard-hatch-%e2%80%98battlestar-galactica%e2%80%99-star-dead-at-71/ar-AAmIwuj?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=UE13DHP

 

Richard Hatch, who was best known for his role as Captain Apollo in “Battlestar Galactica,” died Tuesday. He was 71.

 

Hatch got his start with the Los Angeles Repertory Theater as well as shows in Chicago and off Broadway before moving to the silver screen, where he debuted in 1971 on “All My Children.” His first major role came in “The Streets of San Francisco” as Inspector Dan Robbins in 1976, the final season of the detective show.

 

But his most famous part was Captain Apollo in the 1978 “Battlestar Galactica” TV show, a role for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe.

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38906672

 

Alan Simpson of writing duo Galton and Simpson has died at the age of 87, his manager has said.
 
The pair created sitcoms including Hancock's Half Hour and Steptoe and Son.
 
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Alan Simpson and Ray Galton met at Milford Sanatorium in Surrey as teenagers, having both been diagnosed with tuberculosis, and started writing for the hospital's radio station.
 
They went on to write television, film and stage scripts for stars including Peter Sellers, Leonard Rossiter and Frankie Howerd.
 
Galton and Simpson are credited with bringing social realism to British comedy.
 
Hancock's Half Hour started as a radio show in 1954, before transferring to television. It was aired on the BBC from 1956 to 1960.
 
Their biggest TV hit however was Steptoe and Son, about father-and-son rag and bone team Harold and Albert, and their lives in a squalid home. [This show was the basis for Sanford & Son - RK]
 
It ran for 12 years, from 1962 to 1974, reaching an audience of 28 million.
 
This episode is considered a landmark of British TV comedy:
 
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http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/stanley-kallis-dead-dies-hawaii-five-o-1201984789/

 

Television producer and writer Stanley Kallis, who worked on shows including “Hawaii Five-O” and “Mission: Impossible,” died at his home in Laguna Beach, Calif. on Jan. 28.

 

He helped develop the concept for “Hawaii 5-0” for CBS with writer Leonard Freeman, then moved to producing “Mission: Impossible” with Peter Graves and Martin Landau before returning to “Hawaii 5-0” as executive producer.

 

His next show as producer was “Police Story,” created by Joseph Wambaugh, which won the Emmy for drama series in 1976. In the late 70s, Kallis produced  “Washington Behind Closed Doors,” a mini-series for ABC that won seven Emmy nominations.

 

During the 1980s, he produced projects including “The Manions of America,” “Amber Waves,” “Two of a Kind,” “Columbo” and “The Glitter Dome,” also based on a Wambaugh novel.

 

Kallis moved to Hollywood when his father Mischa Kallis became art director for Paramount Studios. After graduating UCLA, he became an assistant film editor.

 

With backing from his father and brother, he wrote and produced three B-movies that led to a TV series, “The Law and Mr. Jones,” starring James Whitmore. His first TV writing credit came on “Wagon Train” in 1959. He wrote and produced for the “Dick Powell Anthology” as well as “The Danny Thomas Hour.”

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Moore

 

Lt. General Hal Moore, author of We Were Soldiers Once, And Young (filmed in 2002 as We Were Soldiers starring Mel Gibson as Moore), detailingthe  Battle of the Ia Drang Valley (the United States' first large-unit battle of the Vietnam War), has died, two days short of his 95th birthday.

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"Professor" Irwin Corey has died at the ripe old age of 102. A stand-up comedian, improvisational actor, and leftist activist, he appeared in many films and television shows.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irwin_Corey

 

 

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I was working at a San Francisco TV station in 1968. We did an interview with the Professor who was appearing at a club in the city. They showed us to his dressing room and we knocked on the door and he said come in. Well, I walked in with my camera and the host and an assistant. The Professor was standing there in his under wear ironing his pants. He wanted to do the interview in his underwear, but the host thought we should do it with pants on. I agreed with Irwin, but he put on his pants and invited us to watch his act.We accepted and then he said during his act he ask the audience if they have any questions and he gave us each a question to ask him. My question was "Tell me Professor, do you believe in sex before the wedding"? His answer was "There's nothing wrong with sex before the wedding as long as you don't block the aisles"...

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I grew up seeing his name on TV credits, but never knew he and Angela were related


 


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bruce-lansbury-dead-tv-producer-angela-lansburys-brother-was-87-976535


 


Bruce Lansbury, the veteran TV producer and writer known for his work on The Wild Wild West, Wonder Woman and Murder, She Wrote, which starred his older sister, Angela Lansbury, has died. He was 87.


 


The London-born Lansbury died Monday in La Quinta, Calif., after a battle with Alzheimer’s disease, his daughter, Felicia Lansbury Meyer, told The Hollywood Reporter.


 


His survivors also include his twin brother, Edgar Lansbury; he produced the popular 1970s Broadway revival of Gypsy that starred their sister and worked on films including The Wild Party (1975), directed by James Ivory.


 


Lansbury also served as vp creative affairs for Paramount Television starting in the late 1960s, supervising such series as The Brady Bunch; Happy Days; The Odd Couple; Love, American Style; and Petrocelli.


 


Lansbury demonstrated a flair for sci-fi and fantasy at points during his career, especially early on.


 


He joined CBS' The Wild Wild West before its second season and assumed control of the futuristic Western in the summer of 1966 when the show's creator, Michael Garrison, died from injuries suffered in a fall in his home. Lansbury went on to produce 69 episodes of Wild Wild West before it was canceled in 1969 amid an outcry over violence on television.


 


Lansbury then guided 43 installments of CBS' Mission: Impossible (1969-72), 38 episodes of ABC-CBS' Wonder Woman (1977-79), 20 of NBC's Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1979-80) and 21 of NBC's Knight Rider (1985-86).


 


He also created the short-lived 1973-74 CBS series The Magician, starring Bill Bixby; wrote for NBC's The Powers of Matthew Star; and produced the 1987 telefilm The Return of the Six-Million-Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman and episodes of the 1977 NBC drama The Fantastic J


 


Lansbury joined CBS' Murder, She Wrote at the start of the series' ninth season in 1992 and served as supervising producer on 88 episodes over four years, through the show's conclusion in May 1996. He also wrote 15 episodes.


 


Lansbury was the son of Irish-born stage actress Moyna Macgill and Edgar Lansbury, a politician and timber merchant. His grandfather was George Lansbury, a former Labor Party leader in England and a member of Parliament.


 


With the outbreak of World War II, he came to New York with his sister, brother and mother. The family then settled in Los Angeles in the mid-1940s, and he served in the U.S. Army and graduated from UCLA.


 


Lansbury began his career in the business at WABC-TV in Los Angeles and then worked in program development at CBS in Los Angeles and New York.


 


He married Mary Hassalevris in 1951 and remained with her until her 1996 death. In 1998, he married Gail England, and she survives him.


 


His other survivors include his other daughter Christiane; grandchildren Alexandra, Michael, Audrey and William; great-grandsons Theo and Luc; and his wife's children Danielle and Jordan and her grandsons Robert and Jake.


 


Still going strong, Angela Lansbury, 91, solved 12 seasons' worth of crimes as the novelist/amateur sleuth Jessica Fletcher on Murder, She Wrote. She also has won five Tony Awards and was nominated for three Academy Awards during her illustrious career.


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Sometimes I don't know what's worse, somebody dying suddenly or somebody dying a slow, lingering death such as Bruce Lansbury.  Mission Impossible and The Wild, Wild West were two of my favorite TV shows to watch when I was a kid.

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http://www.imdb.com/board/bd0000010/threads/

 

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The IMDb Message Boards passed away Sunday night, February 19, 2017. The forum had learned of its terminal condition a few weeks earlier.

 

The IMDb MB had enjoyed a mostly well-behaved childhood, but became far more difficult to handle around 20o7 after being introduced to video games and the subgroup that plays them. A later interest in political matters would unfortunately develop into a pathological obsession, ultimately contributing to its premature demise.

 

The forum is survived by thousands of devoted users.

 

The IMDb MB asked that it be remembered as a place where movie lovers were able to exchange information and ideas, and that memorials in its name NOT be posted on Facebook or Twitter.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Miriam Colon Dies at 80

Miriam Colon, a pioneering actress in U.S. Latino New York theater who starred in films alongside Marlon Brando and Al Pacino, died Friday.

Her husband, Fred Valle, told The Associated Press that Colon died early Friday in a New York hospital because of complications from a pulmonary infection. She was 80 years old.

Colon — whose image appeared on posters throughout the American Southwest for her role in the 2013 movie adaptation of quintessential Chicano novel Bless Me, Ultima — had been active as late as 2015 with a cameo appearance on the AMC-TV series Better Call Saul.

Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, Colon participated in the theater during her school years and was allowed to audit classes in the drama department at the University of Puerto Rico before she graduated from high school

 

I remember this lady from Scarface and a charming episode of Gunsmoke where Mariette Hartley and she try to keep their men from killing each other over a "matter of honor" before the little daughter of one does the trick.  These were only two of performances too numerous to mention.

 

Puerto Ricans:  You've given us Raul Julia and Miriam Colon?  What's in your water? 

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Miriam Colon Dies at 80

Miriam Colon, a pioneering actress in U.S. Latino New York theater who starred in films alongside Marlon Brando and Al Pacino, died Friday.

Her husband, Fred Valle, told The Associated Press that Colon died early Friday in a New York hospital because of complications from a pulmonary infection. She was 80 years old.

 

 

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Thank you for those photos, Richard.  She was on a Tales of Wells Fargo episode from 1958 tonight which showed how beautiful-and slender-she was back then.  Yours show that the figure might have expanded but the beauty never did.     

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  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/18/obituaries/chuck-berry-musician-dies.html

 

Chuck Berry, who with his indelible guitar licks, brash self-confidence and memorable songs about cars, girls and wild dance parties did as much as anyone to define rock ’n’ roll’s potential and attitude in its early years, died on Saturday. He was 90.

 

The St. Charles County Police Department in Missouri confirmed his death on its Facebook page. The department said it responded to a medical emergency at a home and he was declared dead after lifesaving measures were unsuccessful.

 

While Elvis Presley was rock’s first pop star and teenage heartthrob, Mr. Berry was its master theorist and conceptual genius, the songwriter who understood what the kids wanted before they did themselves. With songs like “Johnny B. Goode” and “Roll Over Beethoven,” he gave his listeners more than they knew they were getting from jukebox entertainment.

His guitar lines wired the lean twang of country and the bite of the blues into phrases with both a streamlined trajectory and a long memory. And tucked into the lighthearted, telegraphic narratives that he sang with such clear enunciation was a sly defiance, upending convention to claim the pleasures of the moment.

 

 

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TCM should do a Berry tribute, including the 1956 film "Rock, Rock, Rock!" and Taylor Hackford's 1987 documentary "Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll."

 

 

 

 

THE FATHER OF ROCK 'N ROLL

 

WE OWE SO MUCH TO CHUCK BERRY - - without him there would be no Beatles; there would be no Beach Boys; there would be no Stones-- there would be no nothing--

 

Everyone in Rock 'n Roll had to start somewhere and everyone started with Chuck Berry. Everyone had to play Chuck Berry to prove that they knew how to play rock and roll. And then they went on from there--

 

Chuck Berry set the standard and we should all be grateful for his tremendous contribution to American popular culture and music.

 

BTW-- My favorite Chuck Berry song is "Havana Moon". If you've never heard it, you've never heard the "Deep Feeling" of Chuck Berry's music. Santana has a beautiful version of it.

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And then there was the classic 1978 "Saturday Night Live" episode in which Steve Martin played a psychic predicting news stories. He noted that the Voyager 1 spacecraft -- which had been dispatched to the far reaches of outer space a year earlier -- was stocked with sound samples. He said music was included, too -- "everything from classical to Chuck Berry."

 

The psychic predicted that an upcoming issue of Time magazine would feature a four-word response from alien beings:

 

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/lawrence-montaigne-dead-star-trek-actor-who-replaced-leonard-nimoy-was-86-987230

 

Lawrence Montaigne, who played a Romulan and then a Vulcan on episodes of the original Star Trek and at one point was lined up to replace Leonard Nimoy on the series, has died. He was 86.

 

Montaigne, who also appeared in the Steve McQueen war classic The Great Escape (1963) and on TV's Batman as a robot controlled by the Joker, died Friday, his daughter, Jessica, reported on Facebook.

 

Montaigne portrayed Decius on "Balance of Terror," the first-season, December 1966 episode that introduced the Romulan race — he has a memorable line, "Permit me the glory of the kill" — then played the Vulcan character Stonn on the second-season opener, "Amok Time," in September 1967.

 

In a 2012 interview with the website StarTrek.com, the actor said that between the first and second seasons of the NBC show, Nimoy was in talks to join the CBS crime drama Mission: Impossible and producers wanted Montaigne to replace him (perhaps as Spock or as another character) if indeed he departed.

 

"They did the contracts and the whole thing, but there was a stipulation in the contract that said if Leonard comes back, then the whole thing is over," he recalled. "I was going on the assumption that I was going to play Spock when my agent called and said, 'Leonard is coming back to do the show. He's in and you're out.'

 

"A week or two later, they called me to do this role of Stonn, who was a Vulcan. It all boiled down to the fact that Leonard and I looked alike to a great extent. I guess that's what they were looking for with Stonn."

 

In the StarTrek.com interview, Montaigne said that after Nimoy returned, "I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn't happen, it really didn't change my life in any way."

 

In The Great Escape, directed by John Sturges, Montaigne played the Canadian P.O.W. Haynes, one of the prisoners who doesn't get out alive.

 

Born in Brooklyn and raised in Rome, Montaigne early in his career appeared on Broadway, worked as a stuntman fencer in Scaramouche (1952) and danced in The Band Wagon (1953), starring Fred Astaire.

 

On ABC's Batman, he played Mr. Glee, a lifelike robot who becomes a bank teller at the behest of the felonious funnyman the Joker (Cesar Romero). Montaigne appeared often on television, with roles on such shows as The Outer Limits, Burke's Law, Hogan's Heroes, Dr. Kildare, The Time Tunnel, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The F.B.I. and McCloud.

 

His body of film work also includes Tobruk (1967), The Power (1968), The Psycho Lover (1970) and Escape to Witch Mountain (1975).

 

Montaigne wrote novels as well as an autobiography, 2006's A Vulcan Odyssey.

 

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http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/chuck-barris-dead-dies-gong-show-host-1202013790/

 

Chuck Barris, who hosted “The Gong Show” and created “The Dating Game” and “The Newlywed Game,” died Tuesday of natural causes in Palisades, N.Y., his publicist confirmed. He was 87.

 

His autobiography, “Confessions of a Dangerous Mind,” was made into a film directed by George Clooney and starred Sam Rockwell as Barris. In the book (subtitled “An Unauthorized Autobiography”), he claimed to have worked for the CIA as an assassin during the 1960s and ’70s, a claim which the CIA denied. “He also fabricated his life because it might have been the best way of getting at the truth. The truth was that back when he was the Jerry Springer of his day, he couldn’t stomach being attacked for doing something he considered harmless,” wrote Joel Stein in Time magazine.

 

The multi-talented game show creator was also a songwriter, writing songs such as “Palisades Park” as well as music for his game shows.

Born Charles Hirsch Barris in Philadelphia, he started out working as a page at NBC in New York, then worked backstage at “American Bandstand.” “Palisades Park” was recorded by Freddy Cannon and hit No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

 

He formed Chuck Barris Productions in 1965 and created “The Dating Game,” hosted by Jim Lange, which introduced swinging 1960s double entendres to the formerly staid game show genre and ran for 11 out of the next 15 years. In 1966 he launched “The Newlywed Game,” hosted by Bob Eubanks, which ran for 19 years; Game Show Network still airs a version of the show.

 

Barris finally made it in front of the camera when he began hosting “The Gong Show” in 1976. Though it only ran two years on NBC and four years in syndication, the show is still remembered for its wacky spoof of the talent show format. He introduced the amateur contestants dressed in colorful clothing with odd props, with judges Jamie Farr, Jaye P. Morgan and Arte Johnson adding to the goofy atmosphere. Other offbeat characters on the show included “Gene Gene the Dancing Machine” and Murray Langston, the “Unknown Comic,” who wore a paper bag over his head.

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In 1971 and when I was 19 y/o, I briefly met Chuck Barris when I auditioned for and was picked as a Dating Game contestant. My very first game show appearance.

 

(...yeah, thaaaat's right...I was on that dumb show, and the "lovely bachelorette" picked me from the other two young goofballs on stage...our date consisted of going to Ensenada Mexico...and because we were under 21, we were accompanied by a chaperone...an "older woman" in her late twenties...and I remember being MUCH more interested in HER than I was my date)

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In 1971 and when I was 19 y/o, I briefly met Chuck Barris when I auditioned for and was picked as a Dating Game contestant. My very first game show appearance.

 

 

How many game show appearances did you make? And is your ep of Dating Game on YouTube?

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How many game show appearances did you make? And is your ep of Dating Game on YouTube?

 

Four all together, Lawrence.

 

The previously mentioned The Dating Game in '71; in 1973 the ABC network's quiz show Split Second(1972-75) hosted by Tom Kennedy(won $550 on that one); in 1980 the Barry-Enright syndicated quiz show Bullseye(1980-82) hosted by my old Dating Game buddy Jim Lange(won $10,500 on that one); and finally a very short-lived quiz show titled Couch Potatoes hosted by Marc Summers in 1989, and with my "lovely parting gift" being a Lazy Boy recliner on that one.

 

(...oh, and no...unfortunately I could never find any of my appearances on YouTube or anyplace else on the internet)

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Four all together, Lawrence.

 

The previously mentioned The Dating Game in '71; in 1973 the ABC network's quiz show Split Second(1972-75) hosted by Tom Kennedy(won $550 on that one); in 1980 the Barry-Enright syndicated quiz show Bullseye(1980-82) hosted by my old Dating Game buddy Jim Lange(won $10,500 on that one); and finally a very short-lived quiz show titled Couch Potatoes hosted by Marc Summers in 1989, and with my "lovely parting gift" being a Lazy Boy recliner on that one.

 

(...oh, and no...unfortunately I could never find any of my appearances on YouTube or anyplace else on the internet)

 

Sometimes you can get dubs from the networks.  Might be worth checking out.

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Four all together, Lawrence.

 

The previously mentioned The Dating Game in '71; in 1973 the ABC network's quiz show Split Second(1972-75) hosted by Tom Kennedy(won $550 on that one); in 1980 the Barry-Enright syndicated quiz show Bullseye(1980-82) hosted by my old Dating Game buddy Jim Lange(won $10,500 on that one); and finally a very short-lived quiz show titled Couch Potatoes hosted by Marc Summers in 1989, and with my "lovely parting gift" being a Lazy Boy recliner on that one.

 

(...oh, and no...unfortunately I could never find any of my appearances on YouTube or anyplace else on the internet)

 

 

How did you get on so many game shows???

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How did you get on so many game shows???

 

Probably due to the same thing they say are the three things most important about real estate, Hibi:

 

"Location, location, location"!

 

In other words, having resided in SoCal all those years, and a location where most game/quiz shows are produced, it would make it not only easier for me to apply as a contestant, but the programs' producers also like this fact, as it also makes scheduling a local resident's taping more convenient for them.

 

(...and of course not also taking into consideration that my handsome visage AND sparking personality would make their selection of me to be on their various programs a no-brainer to begin with!!!)   ;)

 

LOL

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