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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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http://deadline.com/2017/07/patti-deutsch-dies-laugh-in-match-game-rsmurfs-1202138575/
 

Patti Deutsch, a comic who was a regular on the last season of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, appeared often on the 1970s Match Game and went on to a successful voice-over career, has died. She was 73. Her family said she died Wednesday at her Los Angeles home after a long battle with cancer.

 

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Born in Pittsburgh on December 16, 1943, Deutsch worked alongside Fred Willard in the improv troupe Ace Trucking Company in the 1960s and early ’70s. The group, which made multiple appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, also featured Bill Saluga, who would go to be known as the “You can call me Ray” pitchman for Natural Light beer.

Deutsch’s big break came in 1972 when she was cast as a regular on NBC’s politically tinged sketch series Laugh-In. But the show was past its peak as a big part of the era’s pop culture zeitgeist, and the 1972-73 season would be its last.

As that series wrapped, the nasally voiced comic and actress became a semi-regular on Match Game ’73, the Gene Rayburn-hosted daytime game show revival known for celebrities’ racy and ribald answers to the host’s questions. Deutsch was a popular draw on the show, which led to her joining the couples game show Tattletales, appearing with and her husband, writer Donald Ross (The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote).

By the mid-’80s, Deutsch had begun a successful second career as a voice actor on shows including The Smurfs, while continuing to guest on live-action TV series such as She’s the Sheriff and Moonlighting. She lent her voice to episodes of such ’90s toon series as Darkwing Duck and The Critters.

She continued to work through the 2000s, doing voice roles in such films as Tarzan, The Emperor’s New Groove, Monsters, Inc. and Happily N’Ever After. Her final credit was a guest role in the 2013 ABC series Don’t Trust the B— in Apartment 23.

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https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jul/31/jeanne-moreau-star-of-jules-et-jim-dies-aged-89

 

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Jeanne Moreau, the actress best known for her performance in French New Wave classic Jules et Jim, has died aged 89 at her home in Paris, her agent has said.

 

A director, screenwriter and singer as well as a stage and screen actor, Moreau came to prominence with a series of roles in films considered part of the French New Wave, including Lift to the Scaffold and Jules et Jim. She also appeared in a number of Hollywood films, such as The Last Tycoon and Orson Welles’s adaptation of Franz Kafka’s The Trial.

 

In a statement on Twitter, the French president, Emmanuel Macron, paid tribute to Moreau, saying that the actor “embodied cinema” and was a free spirit who “always rebelled against the established order”.

 

Moreau was born in Paris in 1928. Her father was a French restaurateur; her mother was a cabaret dancer from Oldham who moved to Paris in her 20s and later performed at the Folies Bergère. In a 2001 interview with the Guardian, Moreau credited her mother’s heritage with influencing her own somewhat detached personality. “People in France could see I was different from the usual actresses of that time. Maybe that’s why I attracted so many Anglo-Saxon directors like Orson Welles and Tony Richardson. In French, one says ‘Ma langue maternelle est le français [my mother tongue is French].’ But I say: ‘Ma langue maternelle est l’anglais.’ My feminine side is English,” she said.

 

Moreau began her acting career on stage, and became a leading figure in the Comédie-Française. In the 1950s she moved to film, and achieved national recognition with starring roles in two Louis Malle movies: the film noir Lift to the Scaffold and the drama Les Amants (The Lovers). The films proved controversial, with Les Amants becoming the subject of an obscenity case in the US supreme court, yet both are now considered landmark works. In 1960, Moreau best actress prize at Cannes for Seven Days… Seven Nights.

 

But it was Jules et Jim that made Moreau an international name. Directed by François Truffaut, the stylish 1962 film was set during the first world war and depicted a love triangle between Moreau’s character, Catherine, and the titular Jules (Oskar Werner) and Jim (Henri Serre). Jules et Jim has proved hugely influential, becoming synonymous with the French New Wave movement and regularly appearing on best-of lists.

 

Moreau almost appeared in another landmark 1960s role – Mrs Robinson in The Graduate, but turned down the part. Her career continued into her later years. In 1992, she won the César award for best actress for her performance in The Old Lady Who Walked in the Sea. She also directed two films of her own: Lumière (1976) and L’Adolescente (1979).

 

A notoriously difficult interviewee, Moreau responded with characteristic sharpness when asked if she ever felt nostalgic for the French New Wave. “Nostalgia for what? Nostalgia is when you want things to stay the same. I know so many people staying in the same place. And I think, my God, look at them! They’re dead before they die. That’s a terrible risk. Living is risking.”

 

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Sam Shepard, playwright, director and actor, has died from ALS at age 73 per THE DAILY BEAST.

 

I've always thought that Dolly Parton and he made the most believable of the Steel Magnolias couples.  He was such a talent in all phases of theater and film; it's great that he's leaving such a legacy of work that will live long past this day.  R.I.P., sir.

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I wonder if Laddie took his "step-up" Box with him.

 

When Laddie wasn't working with his made in heaven actresses, like Veronica Lake and June Allyson, the studio provided him with a "step-up" Box so he could easily kiss the ladies who were a tad bit taller than him.

 

 

I read an anecdote in Googies Coffeeshop to the Stars about a practical joke pulled on Alan Ladd by stage hands regarding his "step up" box. It was on the set of Botany Bay and Ladd was wearing leg irons for his role as a prisoner. While he was taking a nap one day in his trailer a grip sneaked into the trailer and secured his leg irons to the 2x4 wooden box that he used to "heighten" himself in some scenes.

 

Writes Steve Hayes, author of the book, who witnessed the joke:

 

Word of the joke leaked to everyone on the set and we were all "casually" sitting around the sound-stage when Ladd woke up. We heard him curse as he found himself chained to the block and we all waited eagerly to see what would happen next.

 

Ladd fooled everyone. Shortly he emerged as if nothing were amiss, nonchalantly dragging the 2x4 down the trailer steps as if he didn't notice it. He then grinned, waved to everyone and in his inimitable deep gravelly voice said, "I'd like to thank the thoughtful **** who did this. Now I'll never have to worry about finding something to stand on!" And as everyone around him cracked up he calmly made his way to the set.

 

We all applauded. And after Ladd was out of earshot (one of the stage hands) turned to us and said, "And that, boys and girls, is how you become a class act!"

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Sam Shepard, playwright, director and actor, has died from ALS at age 73 per THE DAILY BEAST.

 

Saw that while watching the evening news last night.  Sounded like they said he died several days earlier.  If true, I wonder at the delay of announcement.

 

Although it was asked about pilot  CHUCK YEAGER , who Sam played in "The Right Stuff", that scene near the end could well be said of Sam.

 

When the scene of Yeager, walking away from a crashed test plane was seen in the distance and someone asks, "Is that a MAN?"  and the reply was..."It sure IS!"   ....or words to that effect.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/08/02/541146009/legendary-editor-judith-jones-dies-at-93

 

Judith Jones may not have been a household name, but without her, some of the world's most famous books may never have made it to many library and kitchen shelves.

The editor died Wednesday at her home in Vermont, according to a statement from the publisher Knopf.

She was 93.

Her stepdaughter said the cause was complications from Alzheimer's disease.

Jones worked at Knopf for more than five decades. She retired in 2011 as senior editor and vice president.

It was 1950 when Jones at age 27 was working in Paris as an editorial assistant at Doubleday Publishing. She stumbled upon a book in the discard pile as she was in the middle of writing rejection letters. This one, however, she could not put down. She was struck by the face on the cover. It was Anne Frank.

"I read all afternoon with the tears coming down my face," Jones told NPR's Jacki Lyden in a 1998 interview. "When my boss got back, it was evening by then. He said, 'What are you doing still here?' And I said, 'We have to have this book!' And he said, 'What? That book by that kid?'"

The book by that kid became The Diary of Anne Frank. It had already been released in German and Dutch, but Jones convinced her bosses to publish it in the United States, vastly expanding its readership.

It went on to sell more than 30 million copies worldwide in more than 60 languages.

That canny move convinced Knopf to hire Jones in 1957. Once again she persuaded a publishing house to take a risk on another rejected work; this one a manuscript co-authored by Julia Child.

Jones got Mastering the Art of French Cooking published in 1961 and helped revolutionize the way Americans cook.

As Jones wrote in her 2007 autobiography The Tenth Muse: My Life in Food:

"With a new, exotic, unfamiliar style of cooking, more than ever we are flying blind — we may never even have tasted the dish we are trying to reproduce — and we need a lot of hand-holding. So I kept my eyes and ears, to say nothing of my taste buds, open to the kind of writer-cook who was particularly gifted, like Julia, at explaining the techniques of a different cooking culture."

Throughout her career, Jones championed various cookbook authors who went on to become icons: James Beard, Marcella Hazan and Lida Bastianich, said Knopf in its statement.

She also worked with such luminary authors as John Updike and Anne Tyler.

In addition to editing, she wrote several books about cooking and baking, some alongside her husband, Evan Jones, reports The Washington Post.

She leaves behind four children and stepchildren, five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren, says The Post.

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Ty Hardin (January 1, 1930-August 3, 2017) - TV and film actor, best known for his starring role on TV's Bronco (1958-1962). His film roles included I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958), Last Train from Gun Hill (1959), Merrill's Marauders (1962), The Chapman Report (1962), Palm Springs Weekend (1963), Battle of the Bulge (1965), Berserk! (1967), and Custer of the West (1967), among others. He was reportedly the first actor considered for Sergio Leone's Man with No Name trilogy, as well as the producers' first choice for TV's Batman.

 

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MoreActor Hywel Bennett, known for his roles in Shelley and EastEnders, has died aged 73 

 

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I thought that name was familiar, although the face wasn't. I've never seen the shows listed, but I did know Hywel Bennett from a thriller back in 1968 titled Twisted Nerve. He looked a bit different then.

 

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I thought that name was familiar, although the face wasn't. I've never seen the shows listed, but I did know Hywel Bennett from a thriller back in 1968 titled Twisted Nerve. He looked a bit different then.

 

That was his second film with the grown-up Hayley Mills. A year earlier, they co-starred as newlyweds in "The Family Way," which featured a music score by Paul McCartney.

 

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Ty Hardin (January 1, 1930-August 3, 2017) - TV and film actor, best known for his starring role on TV's Bronco (1958-1962). His film roles included I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958), Last Train from Gun Hill (1959), Merrill's Marauders (1962), The Chapman Report (1962), Palm Springs Weekend (1963), Battle of the Bulge (1965), Berserk! (1967), and Custer of the West (1967), among others. He was reportedly the first actor considered for Sergio Leone's Man with No Name trilogy, as well as the producers' first choice for TV's Batman.

 

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I always liked Ty Hardin in Bronco and I thought he was quite good in Palm Beach Weekend.

 

Later in life he got involved in alt-right activity. I don't know if that had any bearing on his later career or not.

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Ty Hardin may have become involved in the alt-right movement later in life but he sure was some nice eye candy in his younger years.

He definitely was quite a hunk, but man, he got messed up. He got fed up with Hollywood, moved to Europe, took drugs, came back to California and became a preacher."It pains me to talk about all the garbage of my past," he once said. "Satan ripped me off." Then he got involved with the "Arizona Patriots," who supposedly were making plans to take over the government. Something just went wrong inside that guy. Too bad, because he came across onscreen as likable.

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He definitely was quite a hunk, but man, he got messed up. He got fed up with Hollywood, moved to Europe, took drugs, came back to California and became a preacher."It pains me to talk about all the garbage of my past," he once said. "Satan ripped me off." Then he got involved with the "Arizona Patriots," who supposedly were making plans to take over the government. Something just went wrong inside that guy. Too bad, because he came across onscreen as likable.

 

That is sad.

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He definitely was quite a hunk, but man, he got messed up. He got fed up with Hollywood, moved to Europe, took drugs, came back to California and became a preacher."It pains me to talk about all the garbage of my past," he once said. "Satan ripped me off." Then he got involved with the "Arizona Patriots," who supposedly were making plans to take over the government. Something just went wrong inside that guy. Too bad, because he came across onscreen as likable.

 

 

SHEESH. I never heard about all that stuff. He was quite the hunk in his younger days. I remember him from WB tv shows and some films. Wasnt he Joan Crawford's love interest in Berserk! ?? :D

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SHEESH. I never heard about all that stuff. He was quite the hunk in his younger days. I remember him from WB tv shows and some films. Wasnt he Joan Crawford's love interest in Berserk! ?? :D

Yes.

 

In 1985, Hardin let a group of "survivalists" in Arizona who became known as the "Arizona Patriots." They held a meeting at a college in Prescott, Arizona, complete with guns, compasses, first-aid kits, and knives. Quoting from The Arizona Republic, April 21, 1985, "This is a call to arms for all patriots," Hardin told attendees. "The government has allowed a constant flow of aliens into our nation. ... The Gestapo movement started with the IRS (well, he may be onto something there). The government is training SWAT teams to put down patriots. So the purpose of  this meeting is to begin training people in the use of weapons. ... I guarantee there will come a day when blood will run in the streets of America."

 

One of the "speakers," a former detective and Green Beret named James Jarrett, told attendees which knives were best for killing, and which camouflage works best in the Arizona desert. He also noted that dental floss could be used to suture a wound. On a lighter note, Jarrett claimed he would not train members of the Jewish Defense League or the Ku Klux Klan.

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He definitely was quite a hunk, but man, he got messed up. He got fed up with Hollywood, moved to Europe, took drugs, came back to California and became a preacher."It pains me to talk about all the garbage of my past," he once said. "Satan ripped me off." Then he got involved with the "Arizona Patriots," who supposedly were making plans to take over the government. Something just went wrong inside that guy. Too bad, because he came across onscreen as likable.

 

Yeah, I'd say besides that whole paranoiac far-right crap Ty got himself involved in as being a reasonable barometer to his questionable mental health status, the additional thought that the guy was married EIGHT freakin' times over the course of his life MIGHT just be another one.

 

(...but hell...I guess when you're THAT good lookin', the pool of women out there who are at first inclined to overlook your other shortcomings grows immeasurably, huh) 

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The last time I looked on Saturday, his website was still up.

 

If anybody wants to take a look at that, you get a first-hand idea of what he was into.

 

Oh, I knew years ago what ol' Ty was "into", Princess.

 

Ya see, about ten years ago or so and before we made our ultimate move to Sedona, my wife and I purchased a very nice house(with a 4 car garage for all of my "toys"...that would be classic cars and motorcycles) to retire to in Prescott AZ.

 

(...and word of Ty's exploits and rest of his crazy band of paranoiac "patriots" there were legend)

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SHEESH. I never heard about all that stuff. He was quite the hunk in his younger days. I remember him from WB tv shows and some films. Wasnt he Joan Crawford's love interest in Berserk! ?? :D

Robert Hardy, who died the same day as Hardin, was also in Berserk (as the police detective).
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In 1985, Hardin let a group of "survivalists" in Arizona who became known as the "Arizona Patriots." They held a meeting at a college in Prescott, Arizona, complete with guns, compasses, first-aid kits, and knives. Quoting from The Arizona Republic, April 21, 1985, "This is a call to arms for all patriots," Hardin told attendees. "The government has allowed a constant flow of aliens into our nation. ... The Gestapo movement started with the IRS (well, he may be onto something there).

So he stood on a tank in Arizona instead of North Vietnam. What's the big deal?

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