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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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The man who first bought the beloved and feared monster Godzilla to life has died, the film company behind the monster says.

 

Haruo Nakajima, who wore the Godzilla suit in 12 movies, died on Monday from pneumonia at the age of 88, it said.

 

In an interview this year Nakajima explained how the original 1954 costume was created from ready-mixed concrete and weighed up to 100kg (220lbs).....

 

He first played Godzilla - a giant beast who emerges from the deep after a nuclear test - in the 1954 film entitled Godzilla directed by Ishiro Honda and produced by the famed Japanese film studio Toho.

He went on to play the character in consecutive sequels as well as playing other beasts Rodan, Mothra and King Kong.

His last outing in the suit was in the 1972 Godzilla vs. Gigan.....

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-40860365?ocid=socialflow_twitter

 

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Yeah, I'd say besides that whole paranoiac far-right crap Ty got himself involved in as being a reasonable barometer to his questionable mental health status, the additional thought that the guy was married EIGHT freakin' times over the course of his life MIGHT just be another one.

 

(...but hell...I guess when you're THAT good lookin', the pool of women out there who are at first inclined to overlook your other shortcomings grows immeasurably, huh) 

 

WOW! That's up with Lana Turner!

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Silly me, I always preferred:

 

 

" Easy lopin' Cattle ropin' Sugarfoot"--

 

 

AKA Will Hutchins, What a Cutie!

In 1985, when he heard that Ty Hardin was arming followers against a potential Russian invasion, Hutchins replied  "he's taking things too seriously."

 

By the way, why is "sarsaparilla" pronounced "sasparilla?"

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http://variety.com/2017/film/news/joe-bologna-dead-82-my-favorite-year-renee-taylor-1202526371/

 

Joseph Bologna, an actor, writer and director known for his role in 1982’s “My Favorite Year” and for his long collaboration on stage and screen with wife Renee Taylor, has died after a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 82.

 

Bologna died Sunday morning at City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. Just last month, Bologna attended a 35th anniversary screening of “My Favorite Year” in Los Angeles.

 

Taylor said Bologna had “a beautiful life and a beautiful death.” Bologna died two days after the couple celebrated their 52nd wedding anniversary.

 

Bologna and Taylor co-wrote and starred in the Broadway show “Lovers and Others Strangers” in 1968. The pair earned Oscar nominations for their screenplay adaptation for the 1970 film starring Gig Young and Bea Arthur. Taylor and Bologna won a Writers Guild Award for their 1971 movie “Made For Each Other,” in which they also starred.

 

In all, the couple co-wrote some 22 plays and collaborated on numerous film and TV projects, including the Marlo Thomas TV special “Acts of Love and Other Comedies,” and such series as CBS’ “Calucci’s Department,” HBO’s “Bedrooms” and PBS’ “American Dream Machine.”

 

Bologna and Taylor were introduced by their mutual manager, Buddy Allen. The couple’s wedding was held on the stage of “The Merv Griffin Show” and featured on the talk show. Taylor noted that they renewed their vows five times over their half-century together, each time in a different religious ceremony.

 

A native of Brooklyn, Bologna grew up in a working-class Italian-American family and went on to serve in the Marine Corps. He then entered the advertising business in the “Mad Men” era. He directed numerous commercials before turning his focus to the stage with Taylor.

 

Bologna’s other film credits include 1976’s “Woman of the Year,” 1984’s “Blame It on Rio” and “The Woman in Red,” 1985’s “Transylvania 6-5000” and 1989’s “It Had to Be You.” He logged dozens of TV credits over the years, from telepics to sitcoms to dramas.

 

Among the notable made-fors were the 1986 miniseries “Sins” and 1983’s “One Cooks, the Other Doesn’t.” Bologna appeared opposite future “Friends” star Matt LeBlanc in the 1991 “Married With Children” spinoff “Top of the Heap” and also in the 1987-88 dramedy”Rags to Riches.” His last TV roles included guest shots on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” “According to Jim” and “Everwood.”

 

Bologna’s last project was the upcoming film “Tango Shalom,” a comedy directed by his son, Gabriel. The elder Bologna co-wrote the screenplay with Claudio and Jos Laniado and stars alongside Taylor. The couple’s daughter, Zizi, served as music supervisor.

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As if they hadn't had enough according to last night's news an attempted bombing of an Oklahoma City bank was foiled by law enforcement and an informer.  The perpetrator, an admirer of Timothy McVeigh, was supposedly a member of "The Patriots". If this is the same organization Ty Hardin helped organize it's sad that this is the legacy he's leaving behind.  What next!   

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http://variety.com/2017/film/news/joe-bologna-dead-82-my-favorite-year-renee-taylor-1202526371/

 

Joseph Bologna, an actor, writer and director known for his role in 1982’s “My Favorite Year” and for his long collaboration on stage and screen with wife Renee Taylor, has died after a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 82.

 

Bologna died Sunday morning at City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. Just last month, Bologna attended a 35th anniversary screening of “My Favorite Year” in Los Angeles.

 

Taylor said Bologna had “a beautiful life and a beautiful death.” Bologna died two days after the couple celebrated their 52nd wedding anniversary.

 

Bologna and Taylor co-wrote and starred in the Broadway show “Lovers and Others Strangers” in 1968. The pair earned Oscar nominations for their screenplay adaptation for the 1970 film starring Gig Young and Bea Arthur. Taylor and Bologna won a Writers Guild Award for their 1971 movie “Made For Each Other,” in which they also starred.

 

In all, the couple co-wrote some 22 plays and collaborated on numerous film and TV projects, including the Marlo Thomas TV special “Acts of Love and Other Comedies,” and such series as CBS’ “Calucci’s Department,” HBO’s “Bedrooms” and PBS’ “American Dream Machine.”

 

Bologna and Taylor were introduced by their mutual manager, Buddy Allen. The couple’s wedding was held on the stage of “The Merv Griffin Show” and featured on the talk show. Taylor noted that they renewed their vows five times over their half-century together, each time in a different religious ceremony.

 

A native of Brooklyn, Bologna grew up in a working-class Italian-American family and went on to serve in the Marine Corps. He then entered the advertising business in the “Mad Men” era. He directed numerous commercials before turning his focus to the stage with Taylor.

 

Bologna’s other film credits include 1976’s “Woman of the Year,” 1984’s “Blame It on Rio” and “The Woman in Red,” 1985’s “Transylvania 6-5000” and 1989’s “It Had to Be You.” He logged dozens of TV credits over the years, from telepics to sitcoms to dramas.

 

Among the notable made-fors were the 1986 miniseries “Sins” and 1983’s “One Cooks, the Other Doesn’t.” Bologna appeared opposite future “Friends” star Matt LeBlanc in the 1991 “Married With Children” spinoff “Top of the Heap” and also in the 1987-88 dramedy”Rags to Riches.” His last TV roles included guest shots on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” “According to Jim” and “Everwood.”

 

Bologna’s last project was the upcoming film “Tango Shalom,” a comedy directed by his son, Gabriel. The elder Bologna co-wrote the screenplay with Claudio and Jos Laniado and stars alongside Taylor. The couple’s daughter, Zizi, served as music supervisor.

 

 

Very sad to hear this. :( They were great together and separately.

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Sonny Landham (February 11, 1941 - August 17, 2017) - Tough-guy character actor Sonny Landham has died at the age of 76. Landham's first notable work was in the films of director Walter Hill, appearing in his films The Warriors (1979), Southern Comfort (1981), and 48 Hours (1982). Arguably Landham's most memorable role came as the Native American tracker Billy in 1987's Predator. Like many of his co-stars in that film, Landham tried his hand at politics, running as a Republican for the Kentucky governorship in 2003, and later for the state senate. His intended 2008 bid for the US Senate seat held by Mitch McConnell was derailed by Landham's comments to the media, after which he retired from public life.

 

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http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-41003085

 

  British science-fiction author Brian Aldiss has died at his home in Oxford, having only just turned 92.

    His death was announced by his literary agents Curtis Brown, who called him an "author of science fiction classics" as well as "an entertaining memoirist".

    Aldiss's short story "Supertoys Last All Summer Long" was the basis for the 2001 film AI Artificial Intelligence.  Developed by Stanley Kubrick, the tale of a boy-like robot was eventually directed by Steven Spielberg.

---

    Alongside JG Ballard, Aldiss pioneered a new wave of science-fiction writing in the 1960s that took the genre into uncharted territory.

    "I don't agree with those people who think science fiction as some kind of prediction of the future," he said on Desert Island Discs in 2007.  "I think it's a metaphor for the human condition."

    Born in Norfolk in 1925, Aldiss was greatly influenced by HG Wells and corresponded with both CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien.
 

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http://variety.com/2017/film/news/tobe-hooper-dead-dies-texas-chain-saw-massacre-poltergeist-director-dies-1202539868/

 

Tobe Hooper, the horror director best known for helming “The Texas Chain Saw Massacre” and “Poltergeist,” died Saturday in Sherman Oaks, Calif., according to the Los Angeles County Coroner. He was 74. The circumstances of his death were not known.

The 1974 “Texas Chain Saw Massacre” became one of the most influential horror films of all time for its realistic approach and deranged vision. Shot for less than $300,000, it tells the story of a group of unfortunate friends who encounter a group of cannibals on their way to visit an old homestead. Though it was banned in several countries for violence, it was one of the most profitable independent films of the 1970s in the U.S. The character of Leatherface was loosely based on serial killer Ed Gein.

Hooper also directed the 1986 sequel “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2,” which took a more comedic approach, as part of his Cannon Films deal.

The 1982 “Poltergeist,” written and produced by Steven Spielberg, also became a classic of the genre. The story of a family coping with a house haunted by unruly ghosts starred JoBeth Williams and Craig T. Nelson. The film was a box office success for MGM and became the eighth-highest grossing film of the year.

After “Poltergeist,” Hooper directed two movies for Cannon Films, “Lifeforce” and “Invaders from Mars,” a remake of the 1953 alien movie.

His 1979 CBS miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s bestselling novel “Salem’s Lot” is considered by many fans to be a high-water mark in televisual horror. Combining the intrigue of a nighttime soap opera with the gothic atmosphere of a classic horror film, the two-part program was eventually reedited and released theatrically throughout Europe.

He continued working in television and film throughout the 1990s and 2000s, but none of the films had the impact of his early works. His last film, the 2013 “Djinn,” was set in the United Arab Emirates and produced by Image Nation. His other more recent works included “Toolbox Murders,” “Mortuary” and two episodes of “Masters of Horror.”

Among his other works was the music video for Billy Idol’s “Dancing With Myself.” In 2011 he co-authored a post-modern horror novel titled “Midnight Movie” in which he himself appeared as the main character.

Willard Tobe Hooper was born in Austin, Texas and taught college before starting out in documentaries.

He is survived by two sons.

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Filmmmaker Tobe Hooper, who directed the influential horror movies THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (1974) and POLTERGEIST (1982), died on August 26, 2017 in Sherman Oaks, California. He was 74. 

 

Hooper's other directing credits include the 1979 TV miniseries of Stephen King's Salem's Lot.

 

Variety remembers Tobe Hooper here: http://variety.com/2017/film/news/tobe-hooper-dead-dies-texas-chain-saw-massacre-poltergeist-director-dies-1202539868/

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/shelley-berman-dead-comic-actor-719716?utm_source=twitter

 

Shelley Berman, the wildly popular “sit-down” comic of the late 1950s and ’60s who, after his career came unhinged following an outburst caught on camera, concentrated on acting and played Larry David’s father on Curb Your Enthusiasm, has died. He was 92.

 

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A standout in a golden era of comedy that included other observational masters like Mort Sahl, Lenny Bruce and Bob Newhart, Berman died early Friday morning at his home in Bell Canyon, Calf., according to a post on his official Facebook page. He had a long battle with Alzheimer's disease.

 

Inside Shelley Berman, his live record released in 1959, became the first comedy album to go gold (reaching sales of 500,000 units) and was the first non-musical recording to win a Grammy Award.

The Chicago native trained as a serious actor before jumping into comedy as a nightclub performer. His signature bit was to sit cross-legged on a bar stool, act as if he were on the telephone and improvise long, complicated, one-sided conversations.

 

Inside Shelley Berman featured a classic seven-minute riff on drunken regret, “The Morning After the Night Before” (“My tongue is asleep and my teeth itch. Where is my Alka-Seltzer?”), and another routine about people’s pornographic-level love of buttermilk.

 

He “typified the everyman who regularly cracked under social pressures and couldn’t quite stay ‘normal,’” Ethan Thompson wrote in the 2010 book, Parody and Taste in Postwar American Television Culture.

 

As an actor, Berman was memorable as a guy who has some dirt on presidential candidate Cliff Robertson in Gore Vidal’s The Best Man (1964); as the misanthropic Archibald Beechcroft, who wills everyone in the world to be just like him (to his eventual dismay), in a 1961 episode of The Twilight Zone; and as a hilariously senile judge on Boston Legal.

 

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Gastone Moschin (June 8 1929 - September 4 2017) - Italian actor Gastone Moschin has died at age 88. He's best known to US audiences for his role as Don Fanucci, the crime boss of Little Italy who meets his end at the hands of a young Vito Corleone (Robert De Niro) in 1974's The Godfather Part II. Moschin had been acting in Italian films since the mid-1950's, and other notable appearances include Seven Times Seven (1968), The Conformist (1970), and Lion of the Desert (1980). He was also a co-star of the My Friends (Amici miei) film series from 1975-1985.

 

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Documentarian Murray Lerner, who filmed Bob Dylan's performance at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival in his 1967 documentary FESTIVAL, has died in New York City. He was 90. Lerner subsequently won the Best Documentary Oscar for his 1981 film FROM MAO TO MOZART, a profile of the violinist Isaac Stern's travels to China. 

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Murray Lerner here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/murray-lerner-dead-oscar-winning-doc-filmmaker-was-90-1035742

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