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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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11 hours ago, SansFin said:

David Ogden Stiers (1942–2018)

I will remember him for all time in The Cheap Detective (1978).

 

Stiers grew up in Oregon and he passed away in Newport, OR--a town of about 10,000 on the central Oregon coast. 

I can't say I was ever really a fan of MASH,  but I loved Stiers' contribution to one of my favorite Disney movies--Beauty and the Beast (1991).  He delivers my favorite line in the entire movie:

(As he's giving Belle a tour of the castle's art work)

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

....but I loved Stiers' contribution to one of my favorite Disney movies--Beauty and the Beast (1991).  He delivers my favorite line in the entire movie:

(As he's giving Belle a tour of the castle's art work)

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My favorite line, as well! He always struck me as a man who might go around quoting Shakespeare sonnets in his real life. A voice such as his is a true blessing. RIP, Sir.

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Seems sad --- considering their age difference, she died only a year after her Family Jewels co-star Jerry Lewis.

Child actress, singer Donna Butterworth dies at 62
Hawaii Times Herald
 
Donna Butterworth, the child actress and singer who co-starred with Jerry Lewis in the 1965 comedy The Family Jewels and alongside Elvis Presley in 1966's Paradise, Hawaiian Style, died Tuesday, March 6, at Hilo Medical Center following a long illness. She was 62.
 
Born in Philadelphia on Feb. 23, 1956, Butterworth was 3 when her family moved to Hawaii.
 
By age 9, she was already a showbiz veteran, having performed concerts on the Islands with entertainer Don Ho. Butterworth was discovered by the producers of Paradise, Hawaiian Style and sang several duets with the King of Rock ’n’ Roll. She gained a cult following, but her acting career was short-lived.
 
She released two singles, “Sailor Boy” and “California Sunshine Boy” on a national record label; appeared on The Hollywood Palace, The Dean Martin Show, The Andy Williams Show and The Danny Kaye Show; and garnered a Golden Globe nomination for most promising newcomer for her role in The Family Jewels.
 
She appeared in Little Leathernecks, an unsold sitcom pilot that aired as an episode of Summer Fun, a seven-week 1966 ABC-TV summer-replacement series, and A Boy Called Nuthin’, a two-part 1967 episode of Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color that starred Ron Howard.
 
As an adult, Butterworth sang professionally and recorded a CD in Hawaii in the early 2000s.
 
Butterworth is survived by her mother, brother, nieces, nephews and cousins.

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On ‎3‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 3:02 AM, spence said:

To me though always felt Stiers was very dull & preferred Larry "Frank Burns" Linville a lot more than him on the all-timer "M*A*S*H"   Often forget that *Duvall was the original Frank Burns.  *"The woodman" Woody allen liked Stiers though & cast him, in a couple of his flix, most notable the only fair (**1/2) 2001 release "Curse of the Jade Scorpian" ($13m.)

Have to disagree with you on this one...I LOVED Charles Emerson Winchester the III, and much preferred him to Frank Burns. 

Winchester may have been a snob, but his snobbishness was downright hilarious, and despite his pompousness at times, he did have a good and human side to him. Burns on the other hand, was a one-dimentional, unlikable buffoon just about all the time during his time on M.A.S.H. and while he could be funny at times, the writers gave the character no room for growth and it was because of this that Linville ended up leaving the show.

Also loved David's role in BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. He will be missed.

 

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Siegfried Rauch (April 2, 1932 - March 11, 2018) - Actor Siegfried Rauch has died at the age of 85. While a great deal of his work was done in his native Germany, he appeared in several English-language films, notably Patton (1970), Le Mans (1971), The Eagle Has Landed (1976), and The Big Red One (1980).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Stephane Audran (November 8, 1932 - March 27, 2018) - French actress whose first major role came in her then-husband Claude Chabrol's film Les Cousins (1959). She appeared in many of his subsequent movies, including Les Bonnes Femmes (1960), Le Femme Infidele (1968), Les Biches (1968), Le Boucher (1969), and Violette Noziere (1978).

Her other notable films included The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Big Red One (1980), and Babette's Feast (1987).

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Louise Latham (September 23, 1922 - February 12, 2018) - American character actress in film and television primarily in the 1960's and 70's. Her first film role may have been the one she's most remembered for, playing Bernice Edgar in 1964's Marnie. Her guest appearances on television were so frequent that it became a running gag in my household whenever she showed up, causing much laughter. She amassed an impressive 111 acting credits, the last being in an episode of The X-Files back in 2000. 

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On 3/11/2018 at 11:43 AM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Have to disagree with you on this one...I LOVED Charles Emerson Winchester the III, and much preferred him to Frank Burns. 

Winchester may have been a snob, but his snobbishness was downright hilarious, and despite his pompousness at times, he did have a good and human side to him. Burns on the other hand, was a one-dimentional, unlikable buffoon just about all the time during his time on M.A.S.H. and while he could be funny at times, the writers gave the character no room for growth and it was because of this that Linville ended up leaving the show.

Also loved David's role in BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. He will be missed.

 

frank burns was their resident conservative punching bag and mash's liberal writers hadda field day making him their object of hate.

frank burns gotta better deal after linville was gone.

frank assaults a blonde in a bathtub he imagines is hot lips and winds up being sent stateside with the rank of lieutenant colonel which made hawkeye fume.

:D

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56 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

frank burns was their resident conservative punching bag and mash's liberal writers hadda field day making him their object of hate.

frank burns gotta better deal after linville was gone.

frank assaults a blonde in a bathtub he imagines is hot lips and winds up being sent stateside with the rank of lieutenant colonel which made hawkeye fume.

:D

I know Frank prided himself on being all for the military, but I don't recall him ever saying what political party he belonged to. Any way you slice it, infidelity and hypocrisy are not limited to either side anyway.

And I am not so sure that Frank didn't say that about being promoted just to anger Hawkeye (as you say, it worked). I have no doubt that the military would want to avoid a scandal, however I think it much more likely that they would send Frank to some psychiatric hospital to get over his obsession over Hot Lips.

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On 3/27/2018 at 6:27 PM, LawrenceA said:

Louise Latham (September 23, 1922 - February 12, 2018) - American character actress in film and television primarily in the 1960's and 70's. Her first film role may have been the one she's most remembered for, playing Bernice Edgar in 1964's Marnie. Her guest appearances on television were so frequent that it became a running gag in my household whenever she showed up, causing much laughter. She amassed an impressive 111 acting credits, the last being in an episode of The X-Files back in 2000. 

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So sorry to hear this! She had a memorable bit in an episode of the Alfred Hitchcock Hour from the same period. The Unlocked Window.

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On 3/27/2018 at 10:36 AM, LawrenceA said:

Stephane Audran (November 8, 1932 - March 27, 2018) - French actress whose first major role came in her then-husband Claude Chabrol's film Les Cousins (1959). She appeared in many of his subsequent movies, including Les Bonnes Femmes (1960), Le Femme Infidele (1968), Les Biches (1968), Le Boucher (1969), and Violette Noziere (1978).

Her other notable films included The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Big Red One (1980), and Babette's Feast (1987).

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Sorry to hear this too. :(

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I remember Louise Latham from her many TV roles. She seemed to specialize in

mothers who were, for different reasons, disappointed in their children or who

were overbearing. Hey, maybe the one was connected to the other.

 

Frank Burns was a Republican. I'm pretty sure he mentioned that in a few episodes.

 

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On March 27, 2018 at 10:36 AM, LawrenceA said:

Stephane Audran (November 8, 1932 - March 27, 2018) - French actress whose first major role came in her then-husband Claude Chabrol's film Les Cousins (1959). She appeared in many of his subsequent movies, including Les Bonnes Femmes (1960), Le Femme Infidele (1968), Les Biches (1968), Le Boucher (1969), and Violette Noziere (1978).

Her other notable films included The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Big Red One (1980), and Babette's Feast (1987).

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I've only seen a dozen of Stephane Audran's films but she was one of my favourite French actresses.  Her turn as Isabelle Huppert's mother in Violette Noziere was arguably the supporting performance of 1978.  My two other favourites were Les Bonnes Femmes (1960) and Coup de Torchon (1981).

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I remember Louise Latham from her many TV roles. She seemed to specialize in

mothers who were, for different reasons, disappointed in their children or who

were overbearing. Hey, maybe the one was connected to the other.

 

Frank Burns was a Republican. I'm pretty sure he mentioned that in a few episodes.

 

Yes, you could count on her being annoying, and often with an accent!!

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6 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yes, you could count on her being annoying, and often with an accent!!

I had forgotten about the accents, but I sure remember the annoyance. Glad

she, or rather the characters she so often played, wasn't my mother.

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Steven Bochco (December 16, 1943 - April 1, 2018) - Highly successful TV writer and producer, primarily working within the cop show genre. Among his many hits were Hill Street Blues (1981-1987), L.A. Law (1986-1994), Doogie Howser MD (1989-1993), and NYPD Blue (1993-2005). They weren't all hits, though, as Bochco was also behind one of the most notorious flops in television history, 1990's Cop Rock. Bochco, who won 10 Emmy awards during his 45 year career, died after a lengthy battle with leukemia.

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Isao Takahata (October 29, 1935 - April 5, 2018) - Japanese writer, producer and director of animated films. He co-founded the highly regarded Studio Ghibli with business partner Hayao Miyazaki. Among the titles directed by Takahata are the critically acclaimed Grave of the Fireflies (1988), Only Yesterday (1991), Pom Poko (1994), and The Tale of Princess Kaguya (2013), the last of which was nominated for a Best Animated Feature Oscar.

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Susan Anspach (November 23, 1942 - April 2, 2018) - American actress of stage and screen, primarily in the 1970's and 1980's. After a handful of TV appearances in the late 60's, Anspach made her movie debut in 1970's The Landlord. This was followed by perhaps her best known role, opposite Jack Nicholson in Five Easy Pieces (1970). Other films included Play It Again Sam (1972), Blume in Love (1973), Running (1979), The Devil and Max Devlin (1981), Montenegro (1981), and Misunderstood (1984). She amassed some 45 credits in her career. 

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On 4/5/2018 at 9:49 PM, LawrenceA said:

Susan Anspach (November 23, 1942 - April 2, 2018) -

 

I'm sorry to hear about Susan Anspach, whom I primarily recall for Five Easy Pieces and Play It Again Sam ("I'm a doer, you're a watcher"). I always found this lady's over bite to be very sensual, and thought her an intelligent actress who never really found the right role to match her talent.

 

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Soon-Tek Oh (June 29, 1943 - April 4, 2018) - Korean-American actor in primarily villainous roles from the 1960's through 2000's. He was a frequently seen figure in action and B thrillers, including The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Good Guys Wear Black (1978), The Final Countdown (1980), Missing in Action 2 (1985), and Death Wish 4 (1987). He also frequently appeared on television, with notable guest spots on Magnum PIHawaii 5-0Baa Baa Black SheepMacGyver, and Babylon 5. He provided the voice of Fa Zhou in Disney's Mulan (1998). Soon-Tek Oh amassed 116 credits in his career.

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Soon-Tek Oh (June 29, 1943 - April 4, 2018) - Korean-American actor in primarily villainous roles from the 1960's through 2000's. He was a frequently seen figure in action and B thrillers, including The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Good Guys Wear Black (1978), The Final Countdown (1980), Missing in Action 2 (1985), and Death Wish 4 (1987). He also frequently appeared on television, with notable guest spots on Magnum PIHawaii 5-0Baa Baa Black SheepMacGyver, and Babylon 5. He provided the voice of Fa Zhou in Disney's Mulan (1998). Soon-Tek Oh amassed 116 credits in his career.

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I remember him most from his appearances in five M*A*S*H episodes.

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Chuck McCann (September 2, 1934 - April 8, 2018) - American comedian, actor, singer, and voice artist with a career stretching across 7 decades. He started out in regional children's television, eventually moving into nationally broadcast shows, guest spots, and film roles, including movies such as The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (1968), The Projectionist (1971), Herbie Rides Again (1974), Foul Play (1978), Thrashin' (1986), Storyville (1992), and Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995), among many more. He appeared even more frequently on television, and became a very busy voice artist in animated TV series. He amassed 163 credits in his career.

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