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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Joseph Campanella (November 21, 1924 - May 16, 2018) - American actor in film and television. Making his debut in television in the early 1950's, he appeared in drama anthologies, westerns, police shows, and more. He saw his first regular role in 1962's The Doctors and the Nurses. He also appeared in some films, such as The St. Valentine Day's MassacreBenMeteor, and many more. He amassed nearly 200 film and TV credits, along with Emmy nominations for his roles on Mannix and Days of Our Lives.

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Solid, reliable actor. He gave a memorable performance in an episode of Marcus Welby, suffering from a nervous disorder (or so he thought). His character suffered from body spasms, facial tics, etc. This was the first time I ever heard the word "vasectomy" on a tv show. He asked Welby for one, because he didn't want to pass on the disorder.

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On 4/15/2018 at 3:51 PM, LawrenceA said:

Tim O'Connor (July 3, 1927 - April 5, 2018) - American character actor in film and television, specializing in authority figures. His first film appearance was in the 1949 Bowery Boys movie Master Minds, but O'Connor found the greatest success in television, with lengthy roles on Peyton Place, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, and Dynasty. Other movie appearances include The Groundstar Conspiracy (1972), Across 110th Street (1972), Sssssss (1973), and The Naked Gun 2 1/2 (1991). O'Connor amassed 120 credits in his 60 year career.

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I remember him on Peyton Place........

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Patricia Morison, the Broadway and (sometimes) film actress who originated the role of Kate in the 1948 production of Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate, died on May 20, 2018 at her Los Angeles home. She was 103. 

She also starred opposite Yul Brynner in the Broadway cast of The King and I (stepping in after the death of Gertrude Lawrence). 

On film, Morison had supporting roles in The Song of Bernadette, The Fallen Sparrow (both 1943), and Dressed to Kill (1946) opposite Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes. Her best film role, at least according to Darryl F. Zanuck, is one that audiences have never gotten to see. Morison was cast as the wife of Victor Mature in the 1947 classic Kiss of Death and her performance was such a knockout that Zanuck predicted she would earn the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. But due to the content of her character's storyline, the censors demanded that all her scenes be removed from the film.

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Patricia Morison here: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/patricia-morison-dead-kiss-me-kate-star-was-103-783157

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8 minutes ago, Barton_Keyes said:

Patricia Morison, the Broadway and (sometimes) film actress who originated the role of Kate in the 1948 production of Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate, died on May 20, 2018 at her Los Angeles home. She was 103. 

She also starred opposite Yul Brynner in the Broadway cast of The King and I (stepping in after the death of Gertrude Lawrence). 

On film, Morison had supporting roles in The Song of Bernadette, The Fallen Sparrow (both 1943), and Dressed to Kill (1946) opposite Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes. Her best film role, at least according to Darryl F. Zanuck, is one that audiences have never gotten to see. Morison was cast as the wife of Victor Mature in the 1947 classic Kiss of Death and her performance was such a knockout that Zanuck predicted she would earn the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. But due to the content of her character's storyline, the censors demanded that all her scenes be removed from the film.

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Patricia Morison here: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/patricia-morison-dead-kiss-me-kate-star-was-103-783157

I assume these delete scene climaxed with the wife committing suicide on screen,  and that was too much for the censors.   In the final film the wife does indeed commit suicide but, if I recall correctly,  the wife is never seen during the film.

 

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I'm surprised people never speculated on whether Patricia Morison was a lesbian. She was never married, and in some of her films she has more chemistry with the female costars.

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

I'm surprised people never speculated on whether Patricia Morison was a lesbian. She was never married, and in some of her films she has more chemistry with the female costars.

 I know she was a Broadway star, but I don't think that she was much of a movie star. So most people probably,  I for one, never thought that much about her one way or the other.

My knowledge of her is primarily as a guest performer on classicTV--often on music/ variety shows.

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21 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 I know she was a Broadway star, but I don't think that she was much of a movie star. So most people probably,  I for one, never thought that much about her one way or the other.

My knowledge of her is primarily as a guest performer on classicTV--often on music/ variety shows.

Yes. I think that gay men typically draw conclusions about closeted gay actors, whether they are stage or screen stars. But where are the lesbians who are claiming Patricia Morison as one of their own? Many of the closeted female performers tend to remain closeted and are never outed. Margaret Linsday comes to mind, obviously she was a lesbian, but nobody mentions that about her. Ellen Corby was undoubtedly a lesbian. And Judith Anderson. 

It may explain why some stars remain undetected and their sexuality occurs off the radar. While others are not allowed the same type of escape.

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50 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes. I think that gay men typically draw conclusions about closeted gay actors, whether they are stage or screen stars. But where are the lesbians who are claiming Patricia Morison as one of their own? Many of the closeted female performers tend to remain closeted and are never outed. Margaret Linsday comes to mind, obviously she was a lesbian, but nobody mentions that about her. Ellen Corby was undoubtedly a lesbian. And Judith Anderson. 

It may explain why some stars remain undetected and their sexuality occurs off the radar. While others are not allowed the same type of escape.

I've always been a big fan of Patsy Kelly. She was great in Ruby Keeler's come back on Broadway in No No Nanette.

Patsy was always upfront about her sexuality and she didn't seem to have any problems with it.

And in my lifetime Tallulah Bankhead was too. I think it just depended on what people wanted to do and how they felt about it.

There were Upfront people who were all over the place like, Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert. And then there were people like Greta Garbo and Katharine Hepburn-- they did what they felt like doing and if anybody got in their way they would just mow them down.

 Hollywood may have been one of the few places where people could have any kind of sex life they wanted-- in the first half of the 20th century-- and still maintain their professional and social status.

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21 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I've always been a big fan of Patsy Kelly. She was great in Ruby Keeler's come back on Broadway in No No Nanette.

Patsy was always upfront about her sexuality and she didn't seem to have any problems with it.

And in my lifetime Tallulah Bankhead was too. I think it just depended on what people wanted to do and how they felt about it.

There were Upfront people who were all over the place like, Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert. And then there were people like Greta Garbo and Katharine Hepburn-- they did what they felt like doing and if anybody got in their way they would just mow them down.

 Hollywood may have been one of the few places where people could have any kind of sex life they wanted-- in the first half of the 20th century-- and still maintain their professional and social status.

Nicely stated. Thanks.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

... I think it just depended on what people wanted to do and how they felt about it.

There were Upfront people who were all over the place like, Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert. And then there were people like Greta Garbo and Katharine Hepburn-- they did what they felt like doing and if anybody got in their way they would just mow them down.

 Hollywood may have been one of the few places where people could have any kind of sex life they wanted-- in the first half of the 20th century-- and still maintain their professional and social status.

It also likely had to do with the person's religious beliefs. If they were catholic, for example, it would be better to stay in the closet in those days.

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2 hours ago, sagebrush said:

It also likely had to do with the person's religious beliefs. If they were catholic, for example, it would be better to stay in the closet in those days.

Probably the most famous Catholic I can think of in old Hollywood would be Loretta Young. You know where I'm going with that one.

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On 5/16/2018 at 7:33 PM, LawrenceA said:

Joseph Campanella (November 21, 1924 - May 16, 2018) - American actor in film and television. Making his debut in television in the early 1950's, he appeared in drama anthologies, westerns, police shows, and more. He saw his first regular role in 1962's The Doctors and the Nurses. He also appeared in some films, such as The St. Valentine Day's MassacreBenMeteor, and many more. He amassed nearly 200 film and TV credits, along with Emmy nominations for his roles on Mannix and Days of Our Lives.

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Joseph Campanella also did voiceover work on reruns of Life Is Worth Living.

from Wikipedia:

Syndication

Reruns of Life Is Worth Living and The Fulton Sheen Program continued to circulate as late as the early 1990s on broadcast stations, and was later carried by EWTN, with new introductions by actor Joseph Campanella.

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Frank Doubleday (January 28, 1945 - March 3, 2018) - American character actor with a limited resume, but with two very memorable roles in cult favorite films. He made his TV debut in 1975 in an episode of Lucas Tanner, and his feature film debut a year later in The First Nudie Musical. One of his two signature roles came that same year, in John Carpenter's low-budget police thriller Assault on Precinct 13, in which Doubleday appeared as a gangland assassin. Doubleday's other cult role was in another of John Carpenter's films, 1981's Escape from New York. Doubleday played the supporting villain Romero. He showed up in several late 70's-early 80's TV shows, from The Incredible Hulk to Archie's Place, and in other films such as Avenging Angel (1985), Nomads (1986), and Broadcast News (1987). 

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On 5/20/2018 at 3:47 PM, Barton_Keyes said:

Patricia Morison, the Broadway and (sometimes) film actress who originated the role of Kate in the 1948 production of Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate, died on May 20, 2018 at her Los Angeles home. She was 103. 

She also starred opposite Yul Brynner in the Broadway cast of The King and I (stepping in after the death of Gertrude Lawrence). 

On film, Morison had supporting roles in The Song of Bernadette, The Fallen Sparrow (both 1943), and Dressed to Kill (1946) opposite Basil Rathbone's Sherlock Holmes. Her best film role, at least according to Darryl F. Zanuck, is one that audiences have never gotten to see. Morison was cast as the wife of Victor Mature in the 1947 classic Kiss of Death and her performance was such a knockout that Zanuck predicted she would earn the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. But due to the content of her character's storyline, the censors demanded that all her scenes be removed from the film.

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Patricia Morison here: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/patricia-morison-dead-kiss-me-kate-star-was-103-783157

Now that's a SHAME! :(

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Just because someone never married (Patricia Morison) doesnt necessarily mean they were gay. They might have been, they may not have been. Plenty of gays in Hollywood had "closet" marriages, to cover themselves. So being married didnt mean you were straight either. Then there were bisexuals like Marlene Dietrich who remained married to her husband (I think they did divorce at some point) but lived apart.

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34 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Just because someone never married (Patricia Morison) doesnt necessarily mean they were gay. They might have been, they may not have been. Plenty of gays in Hollywood had "closet" marriages, to cover themselves. So being married didnt mean you were straight either. Then there were bisexuals like Marlene Dietrich who remained married to her husband (I think they did divorce at some point) but lived apart.

I think people will still speculate on whether she was a lesbian. That's human nature. There is no negative connotation about gay or lesbian with me. But if she was closeted that's worth discussing in a social context.

When Robert Osborne died, I created a thread about him in the LGBT forum because there were (and still are) two LGBT tags on the bottom of his wiki page. Plus his longtime partner was quoted in the Advocate, a gay publication. I think we can say Osborne was somewhat closeted and that many people did not discuss his orientation while he was alive.

But often when a well-known gay or lesbian person dies, they do get outed. That's what happens in our society. It doesn't mean there's any shame associated with them being gay. But closeting them is no longer necessary. My thoughts.

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Eunice Gayson (March 17, 1928 - June 8, 2018) - British actress notable for a handful of roles in the 1960's. She was the first official Bond girl, appearing in both Dr. No (1962) and From Russia with Love (1963). She also appeared in various minor TV and film roles, with the only other memorable turn being in 1958's The Revenge of Frankenstein.

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On 5/20/2018 at 4:53 PM, TopBilled said:

I'm surprised people never speculated on whether Patricia Morison was a lesbian. She was never married, and in some of her films she has more chemistry with the female costars.

Now now, TopBilled, Linda Ronstadt never married and had chemistry with Emmy Lou Harris and Dolly Parton but I don't think she is a lesbian...NOT THAT THERE'S ANYTHING WRONG WITH THAT [as Jerry Seinfeld would say].

Just teasing ya!

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18 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Now now, TopBilled, Linda Ronstadt never married and had chemistry with Emmy Lou Harris and Dolly Parton but I don't think she is a lesbian...NOT THAT THERE'S ANYTHING WRONG WITH THAT [as Jerry Seinfeld would say].

I know you're teasing but I think you may be missing the point of what I was saying. It's not about whether someone was gay or lesbian. It's about whether they remain closeted after death. And if they don't remain closeted, how they are outed.

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

I know you're teasing but I think you may be missing the point of what I was saying. It's not about whether someone was gay or lesbian. It's about whether they remain closeted after death. And if they don't remain closeted, how they are outed.

Ooooooohhhhhh!

Wouldn't that be termed, uncasketed more appropriately, and just who would want to undertake this role?
 

Get it...undertake? I could go on but you might defriend me.
 

I do know you can't be sued for defamation I think after someone dies. Or at least their medical records are not private anymore. I think a man I know who plays a neurosurgeon out west told me that once over drinks.

So who do you know of, that was not revealed to be gay or lesbian until after death? I'm blanking...

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24 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Ooooooohhhhhh!

Wouldn't that be termed, uncasketed more appropriately, and just who would want to undertake this role?
 

Get it...undertake? I could go on but you might defriend me.
 

I do know you can't be sued for defamation I think after someone dies. Or at least their medical records are not private anymore. I think a man I know who plays a neurosurgeon out west told me that once over drinks.

So who do you know of, that was not revealed to be gay or lesbian until after death? I'm blanking...

I mentioned Robert Osborne earlier in this thread. His partner went public about their relationship after Osborne's death. No doubt that relationship would have remained private if Osborne was still alive. I am sure there have been other examples of this.

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Eunice Gayson (March 17, 1928 - June 8, 2018) - British actress notable for a handful of roles in the 1960's. She was the first official Bond girl, appearing in both Dr. No (1962) and From Russia with Love (1963). She also appeared in various minor TV and film roles, with the only other memorable turn being in 1958's The Revenge of Frankenstein.

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It was Gayson's "Dr. No" character Sylvia Trench who elicited one of filmdom's most famous intros:

 

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A trio of behind-the-scenes deaths of note:

Michael D. Ford (1928-2018) - British art director and set decorator who won Oscars for Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and Titanic (1997), and received nominations for The Empire Strikes Back (1980), Return of the Jedi (1983), and Empire of the Sun (1987). He also worked on Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Living Daylights (1987), License to Kill (1989), and GoldenEye (1995), among many others.

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Francoise Bonnot (1939-2018) - French film editor who worked on many international productions, including Army of Shadows (1969), Four Flies on Grey Velvet (1971), The Tenant (1976), Missing (1982), Hanna K. (1983), Top Secret! (1984), Year of the Dragon (1985), Fat Man and Little Boy (1989), Frida (2002), and Across the Universe (2007), among others. She won the Oscar for Best Editing for 1969's Z.

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Martin Bregman (1926-2018) - American film producer who frequently worked with actor Al Pacino. Their collaborations included Serpico (1973), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Scarface (1983), Sea of Love (1989) and Carlito's Way (1993). Bregman's work on Dog Day Afternoon earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.

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One of Murphy's most memorable scenes in "The Blues Brothers" -- directed by John Landis -- occurred in a Chicago soul food restaurant. "Joliet Jake" and Elwood (played by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd, respectively) -- determined to put their band back together -- showed up to persuade Murphy and saxophone player "Blue Lou" Marini to join their effort. 

Mrs. Murphy (played by the great soul singer Aretha Franklin) expressed displeasure with the idea.

 

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