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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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On 7/4/2018 at 10:58 AM, LawrenceA said:

Robby Muller (April 4, 1940 - July 4, 2018) - Dutch cinematographer who worked with some of the world's more offbeat directors. He began his career in collaboration with German director Wim Wenders on 1970's Summer in the City. They would go on to work together on 10 more films, including The American Friend (1977) and Paris, Texas (1984). Muller also worked several times with director Jim Jarmusch, including on Down By Law (1986), Mystery Train (1989), Dead Man (1995), Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999), and Coffee & Cigarettes (2003). Other noteworthy films on Muller's resume include Repo Man (1984), To Live & Die in L.A. (1985), Breaking the Waves (1996), Dancer in the Dark (2000), and 24 Hour Party People (2002). Despite his illustrious career of international acclaim, he was never nominated for an Oscar, which has to go down as one of the more glaring oversights in that category's history.

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"The American Friend"...what a great movie! Sorry to hear of his passing but thanks for the tribute.

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On 7/17/2018 at 9:32 AM, LawrenceA said:

All I did was post a picture of the guy to supplement speedracer's post. I hadn't read the linked article, but yeah, they definitely got it wrong...twice. Great journalism, People magazine!

 

On 7/17/2018 at 9:38 AM, Hibi said:

LOL. Sigh. They make it sound like he and Oberon were only together for 4 years. They were together for some time before they actually got married.

Ugh.  I didn't read the article.  I just read the headline.  Sorry everyone! 

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The prolific composer Patrick Williams -- who scored numerous episodes of Mary Tyler Moore's 1970s sitcom but didn't write the theme song (that was created by Sonny Curtis) -- has died at the age of 79.

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He did write the jazzy theme for "The Streets of San Francisco," the '70s crime drama that starred Karl Malden and Michael Douglas.

Williams' many other musical contributions during the past 50 years earned him four Primetime Emmys, two Grammys and a Pulitzer Prize nomination. 

For the 1979 hit feature film "Breaking Away," he adapted the operatic works of composers such as Gioachino Rossini (the picture's Indiana hero, played by Dennis Christopher, idolized Italian bicycle racers). For his efforts, Williams received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song Score or Adaptation Score. 

 

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https://angrybearblog.com/2018/07/screenwriter-dies-at-age-100-of-rashomon-1950-greatest-film-of-japan-ever.html

Screenwriter Dies at Age 100, Of “Rashomon,” 1950, Greatest Film of Japan Ever.

Shinobu Hashmoto just died at age 100. His original screenplay for the greatest movie ever made in Japan was initially written while he was recovering in a Japanese hospital for war veterans.with him having tuberculosis. It is famous for showing how different observers of reality may have different views of that reality. The film’s director was Kurowsawa, who worked closely with Hashimoto on many of his films. Regarding the greatest of them all, “Rashomon,” even though now many see it as the ultimate inside view of Japanese culture, not to mention its far broader philosophical implications, when the film was being made,three assistant directors objected to the making of as they “did not understand” what the film was about. The following is an English translation of Kurowoawa’s reply to his assistant directors, as reported by Harrison Smith in his WaPo obit of Hashimoto:

“Human beings are unable to be honest with themselves about themselves. They cannot talk about themselves without embellishing. This script portrays such human beings — the kind who cannot survive without lies to make them feel they are better people than they really are . . . You say that you can’t understand this script at all, but that is because the human heart itself is impossible to understand. If you focus on the impossibility of truly understanding human psychology and read the script one more time, I think you will grasp the point of it.”

 

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Winston Ntshona (October 6, 1941 - August 2, 2018) - South African actor and playwright. Ntshona won widespread acclaim for the plays The Island and Sizwe Banzi is Dead in collaboration with John Kani and Athol Fugard. Ntshona and Kani shared the 1975 Tony award for Best Actor for those plays.

Ntshona made his film debut in 1978's The Wild Geese in the role of President Limbani. Other major film roles came in Ashanti (1979), Marigolds in August (1980), The Dogs of War (1980), Gandhi (1982), A Dry White Season (1989), The Power of One (1992), The Air Up There (1993), Tarzan and the Lost City (1998), I Dreamed of Africa (2000), and Blood Diamond (2006).

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Moshe Mizrahi (September 5, 1931 - August 3, 2018) - Israeli director whose films included Sophie's Ways (1970), The Customer of the Off Season (1970), Daughters, Daughters (1973), and Rachel's Man (1975). He directed one American film, Every Time We Say Goodbye (1986), which starred Tom Hanks. Three of Mizrahi's films were nominated for the Best Foreign Language Oscar: I Love You Rosa (1972), The House on Chelouche Street (1973), and Madame Rosa (1977), the last of which won.

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Charlotte Rae (April 22, 1926 - August 5, 2018) - American actress best known for playing the character of Edna Garrett on the hit TV shows Diff'rent Strokes and The Facts of Life. She made her film debut in the 1969 Tony Randall comedy Hello Down There. Other notable film roles followed in Bananas (1971), The Hot Rock (1972), and Hair (1979). 

She found her greatest success on the small screen, where she got her start back in 1954 with appearances on several of the live drama shows. She was a main cast member of Diff'rent Strokes for the first two seasons in 1978 and 1979, and proved so popular that she was given her own spin-off in The Facts of Life, where she stayed for 7 seasons, earning an Emmy nomination for Best Actress in a Comedy Series in 1982.

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Charlotte Rae was a cousin of the Sgt Ernie Bilko -creator Nat Hiken.

Charlotte is immortalized in classic TV in an early Bilko episode called "The Twitch".

As the wife of an officer on the base, she is asked to lecture on Beethoven and classical music to bring culture to the enlisted men. Bilko manages to get a full house for the Colonel's approval by laying out a gambling game as to how many times she will pull her girdle with a twitch during her lecture!

Nat also used his talented cousin numerous times on another one of his legendary TV sitcoms "Car 54, Where Are You?"

 

1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Charlotte Rae (April 22, 1926 - August 5, 2018) - American actress best known for playing the character of Edna Garrett on the hit TV shows Diff'rent Strokes and The Facts of Life. She made her film debut in the 1969 Tony Randall comedy Hello Down There. Other notable film roles followed in Bananas (1971), The Hot Rock (1972), and Hair (1979). 

She found her greatest success on the small screen, where she got her start back in 1954 with appearances on several of the live drama shows. She was a main cast member of Diff'rent Strokes for the first two seasons in 1978 and 1979, and proved so popular that she was given her own spin-off in The Facts of Life, where she stayed for 7 seasons, earning an Emmy nomination for Best Actress in a Comedy Series in 1982.

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Il-mio-amico-Arnold-Copertina.jpeg

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As a result of Rae's death, Todd Bridges, who played Willis Jackson on "Diff'rent Strokes," is the only surviving original cast member of the series. He turned 53 in May.

Image result for diffrent strokes cast

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Ronnie Taylor (October 27, 1924 - August 3, 2018) - British cinematographer. He worked as a camera operator on such films as The Devils (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and Star Wars (1977) among many others. He was director of photography on several more films, including Circle of Iron (1977), A Chorus Line (1985), Cry Freedom (1987), Opera (1987), Sea of Love (1989), and Sleepless (2001). He shared the Oscar for Best Cinematography with Billy Williams for their work on 1982's Gandhi.

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David Landsberg (1950 - August 5, 2018) - American character actor and screenwriter. He worked most prolifically on television, including as a regular cast member on the Don Rickles series CPO Sharkey (1976-1978). Landsberg also appeared in a number of films in small roles, including Love at First Bite (1979), The Jerk (1979), and Shoot the Moon (1982). His TV writing credits include episodes of Fantasy IslandStar Trek: The Next Generation, and  Cosby.

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Richard H. Kline (November 15, 1926 - August 7, 2018) - American cinematographer who often worked on genre films. He started out shooting television, and made his film D.P. debut on 1966's Chamber of Horrors. Other credits included Hang 'Em High (1968), The Boston Strangler (1968), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Kotch (1971), The Mechanic (1972), Soylent Green (1973), The Fury (1978), Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), Body Heat (1981), and Howard the Duck (1986), among many others. Kline was nominated for the Oscar for Best Cinematography twice, for 1967's Camelot, and 1976's King Kong. Also among Kline's credits was a film much discussed around here of late: 1975's Mandingo.

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Morgana King, the accomplished jazz singer who made her dramatic acting debut in Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather," has died, it was announced Tuesday. She was 87.

The performer, who was born Maria Grazia Morgana Messina on June 4, 1930 in Pleasantville, New York, succumbed to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Palm Springs, California on March 22, 2018.

In "The Godfather" (1972), King played Carmela Corleone, the wife of the powerful 1940s New York mob boss Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando). She reprised the role in Coppola's 1974 sequel, "The Godfather Part II." Both films won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

King reportedly became interested in the role of Mama Corleone after reading author Mario Puzo's best-selling novel. She then visited a hypnotist "to program and condition myself for becoming a member of the cast. It worked!"

During the memorable wedding reception scenes in "The Godfather," King's character performed the popular Neapolitan song "Luna mezz'o mare" (Moon amid the sea).

Although her first album was recorded in the 1950s, King received a 1964-1965 Grammy Award nomination for Best New Artist. Her competition: Petula Clark, Astrud Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and The Beatles (who won).

She recorded "A Taste of Honey,"which was released in 1964. The song also was popularized by such artists as The Beatles and Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass.

Image result for morgana king marlon brando images

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Robert Dix, Actor in 'Forbidden Planet' and 'Forty Guns,' Dies at 83

My buddy Robert Dix passed away on August 7th.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/robert-dix-dead-forbidden-planet-forty-guns-actor-son-richard-dix-dies-at-83-1132829

I initially met Bob through my interest in his father Richard Dix. We became friendly and I often attended movie nights when he was married to Mary Ellen and lived in Chatsworth.  Bob had a lot of wives. When I first met Bob it seemed to me every time I saw him there was another wife with him. Either a previous one or a current one! He moved to Arizona after his divorce from Mary Ellen a few years back. And as happens we lost touch. He was a great guy and sure led an interesting life.  I urge you to read his book. It offers an interesting glimpse into what it's like to be the child of a movie star. I hope there's lots of chicken, Bob!

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7 hours ago, jakeem said:

Morgana King, the accomplished jazz singer who made her dramatic acting debut in Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather," has died, it was announced Tuesday. She was 87.

The performer, who was born Maria Grazia Morgana Messina on June 4, 1930 in Pleasantville, New York, succumbed to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Palm Springs, California on March 22, 2018.

In "The Godfather" (1972), King played Carmela Corleone, the wife of the powerful 1940s New York mob boss Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando). She reprised the role in Coppola's 1974 sequel, "The Godfather Part II." Both films won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

King reportedly became interested in the role of Mama Corleone after reading author Mario Puzo's best-selling novel. She then visited a hypnotist "to program and condition myself for becoming a member of the cast. It worked!"

During the memorable wedding reception scenes in "The Godfather," King's character performed the popular Neapolitan song "Luna mezz'o mare" (Moon amid the sea).

Although her first album was recorded in the 1950s, King received a 1964-1965 Grammy Award nomination for Best New Artist. Her competition: Petula Clark, Astrud Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and The Beatles (who won).

She recorded "A Taste of Honey,"which was released in 1964. The song also was popularized by such artists as The Beatles and Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass.

Image result for morgana king marlon brando images

So sorry to hear this. She had a great voice.

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https://themoscowtimes.com/articles/childrens-writer-eduard-uspensky-dies-at-age-80-62530

Children's Writer Eduard Uspensky Dies at Age 80

The creator of Cheburashka and Crocodile Gena died after a long illness

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Eduard Uspensky, one of the country’s most beloved children’s writers, passed away Tuesday evening after a long illness. He was 80 years old. 

Born in 1937, the height of Stalin’s purges, one of the most horrible years in Russia’s recent history, Uspensky grew up to be one of the funniest Soviet writers and the most recognizable names in children’s literature. 

Uspensky took up writing after graduating from Moscow Aviation Institute, where he studied engineering. His single most famous character is Cheburashka, a furry animal with enormous ears, of indeterminate gender and ancestry. Generations of kids learned about what it is to be friends from watching animated series about the adventures of Cheburashka and his friend, Crocodile Gena, based on Uspensky’s books. Cheburashka also became immensely popular in Japan.

Another creation that brought Uspensky fame is the village Prostokvashino and its inhabitants: Uncle Fyodor, a precocious six year old boy, who’s always extremely serious (hence the nickname “uncle”); his talking dog Sharik and cat Matroskin. 

Uspensky wrote most of the screenplays for the cartoons based on his books and fought for his rights to them. He had well-publicized spat with Soyuzmultfilm, the cartoon behemoth left over from the Soviet era. The conflict concerned the rights to the Prostokvashino franchise when Soyuzmultfilm produced new episodes without paying or consulting Uspensky. 

In addition to his books and screenplays, Uspensky was a television and radio producer. He was behind the iconic children’s TV show “Spokoinoi nochi, malyshi!”(“Good Night, Kids”) and “Radionyanya” (“Radio Nanny”), which explained grammar and basic science to small children. Uspensky also wrote “Grammar,” a textbook for young kids that taught grammar rules under the guise of a fairy tale. 

 

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Barbara Harris, an Oscar nominee for Supporting Actress in 1971 for Who is Harry Kellerman and Why is He Saying All Those Terrible Things About Me, has passed away from lung cancer at the age of 83. She won a tony award for The Apple Tree, and was nominated for Golden Globes for A Thousand Clowns, Nashville, Family Plot, and Freaky Friday. Other film credits included Plaza Suite,The War Between Men and Women, The Seduction of Joe Tynan, Peggy Sue Got Married, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, and Grosse Pointe Blank. She did not appear in much but she never failed to enrich whatever she appeared in....

 

https://variety.com/2018/film/news/barbara-harris-dies-dead-freaky-friday-familly-plot-1202912437/

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

she never failed to enrich whatever she appeared in

I agree. One of my favorite actresses. She is unforgettable in Who is Harry Kellerman and is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me, Nashville, Family Plot, to name a few.

 

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Harris also had a chance to show off her talent as a singer in the final moments of "Nashville," Robert Altman's 1975 Best Picture-nominated musical dramedy. She was a part of a large ensemble that included Ned Beatty, Karen Black, Ronee Blakley, Keith Carradine, Geraldine Chaplin, Shelley Duvall, Henry Gibson, Scott Glenn, Jeff Goldblum, Lily Tomlin and Michael Murphy.

 

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In 1966, Harris received a Tony nomination for her starring role as Daisy Gamble in the musical "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever." That same year, she and co-star John Cullum appeared on the NBC concert series The Bell Telephone Hour. The episode, hosted by Cyril Ritchard, was a salute to the lyricist Alan Jay Lerner.

 

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