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Richard Kimble

Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread

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16 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

One of the all-time great supporting actors.

An actor with whom I worked, knew Bill Daily from NEWHART, told me two things about him.  He was the nicest guy and he was a real ladies man. The second fact kind of surprised me based solely on the type of characters he played. Apparently nice guys make out OK too! (No pun intended.)

I really enjoyed all his performances. I've always been disappointed I never had a chance to meet him to say so.

RIP Mr. Daily, thanks for the laughs.

Yes,  Mr. Daily always made me laugh.    Fine actor and a fine addition to all the T.V. shows he was a regular or guest on.

Bill was the only reason to watch I Dream A Jeannie with the sound on.

Oh,  and I also just found out Bill was a jazz musician,  playing the bass!    What a talented man. 

 

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18 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

One of the all-time great supporting actors.

An actor with whom I worked, knew Bill Daily from NEWHART, told me two things about him.  He was the nicest guy and he was a real ladies man. The second fact kind of surprised me based solely on the type of characters he played. Apparently nice guys make out OK too! (No pun intended.)

I really enjoyed all his performances. I've always been disappointed I never had a chance to meet him to say so.

RIP Mr. Daily, thanks for the laughs.

Just to clarify, for those reading, Bill Daly had a regular supporting role on The Bob Newhart Show. He was not a regular on Newhart, though he did make a guest appearance in that series' final season.

Peter Scolari's character on Newhart was Bob's (Dick's) obnoxious "friend," sort of continuing what Daly had done on the earlier sitcom.

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https://www.starwars.com/news/gary-kurtz-passes-away

GARY KURTZ PASSES AWAY

THE PRODUCER OF STAR WARS AND THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, KURTZ LEAVES BEHIND A POWERFUL LEGACY IN FILM.

Gary Kurtz, the legendary producer of Star Wars (1977) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980), died on Sunday, September 23. He was 78. A key figure in the history of Star Wars and Lucasfilm, Kurtz’s gifts for storytelling can be felt in all his work.

Kurtz first worked with George Lucas as a producer on the coming-of-age comedy American Graffiti (1973), which became a massive surprise hit. It would receive several Academy Award nominations, including one for Kurtz and co-producer Francis Ford Coppola for Best Picture.

 

Following the success of American Graffiti, Kurtz joined Lucas as a producer on his next film: Star Wars. With a budget of $11 million, Star Wars went on to become the highest grossing film ever at the time of its release, garnering 10 Academy Award nominations — including one for Kurtz for Best Picture — and winning six. He returned to produce the sequel to Star Wars — The Empire Strikes Back, a decidedly bigger and more challenging film than its predecessor. Today, both Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back are widely regarded as among the best motion pictures of all time.

After Star Wars, Kurtz produced The Dark Crystal (1982) and Return to Oz (1985), films that have become cult classics.

A man of immense talent and intelligence, Kurtz will be missed greatly by Lucasfilm, and we’ll remember his many contributions to Star Wars and film

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1 hour ago, darrylfxanax said:

Not sure if this has been reported, but read an obit in THR for Laurie Mitchell, who played the title character in Queen of Outer Space.  She was 90.

queen.png

I've heard in her honor, the light from the planet Venus in the western sky will be slightly dimmed this evening.

(...R.I.P. Laurie)

 

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On ‎9‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 1:13 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes,  Mr. Daily always made me laugh.    Fine actor and a fine addition to all the T.V. shows he was a regular or guest on.

Bill was the only reason to watch I Dream A Jeannie with the sound on.

Oh,  and I also just found out Bill was a jazz musician,  playing the bass!    What a talented man. 

 

I like the first Newhart series over the 2nd, with the delightful S. Pleshette who died much too young

 

Repordedly Bob has a new show coming & at age 89

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14 hours ago, darrylfxanax said:

Not sure if this has been reported, but read an obit in THR for Laurie Mitchell, who played the title character in Queen of Outer Space.  She was 90.

queen.png

Awww. Too bad. She made a great queen! (of Venus, at least)

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2 minutes ago, jakeem said:

In case you were wondering, this is how Laurie Mitchell looked without a mask.

Image result for laurie mitchell

She was in an episode of The Adventures of Superman, without a mask as well. Very pretty lady.

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I hadn't realized she was in Some Like It Hot! I'll have to look for her next time I watch it (probably not for quite awhile)......

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

I hadn't realized she was in Some Like It Hot! I'll have to look for her next time I watch it (probably not for quite awhile)......

Laurie+Mitchell+%2528R%2529+in+Some+Like

In the train sleeper scene, Laurie's on the right here, Hibi.

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Just found out that Will Jordan, the versatile stand-up comic and impressionist known for his exaggerated impersonations of TV variety show host Ed Sullivan, died last month at the age of 91. His death at his home in Manhattan on September 6th was attributed to complications from a stroke.

In addition to Sullivan, Jordan -- born William Rauch in The Bronx on July 27, 1927 -- was adept at mimicking such celebrities as Bing Crosby, Groucho Marx and Jack Benny.

Image result for ed sullivan and will jordan

Sullivan and Jordan in 1966

Jordan appeared many times on "The Ed Sullivan Show" between 1954 and 1968 -- and even provided the TV icon's voice for the original Broadway production of "Bye Bye Birdie" in 1960. Sullivan appeared as himself in the 1962 film version of the musical.

Jordan also portrayed Sullivan -- who died in 1974 -- in several movies, including "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" (1978), "The Buddy Holly Story" (1978), "Broadway Danny Rose" (1984), "The Doors" (1991), "Mr. Saturday Night" (1992) and "Down with Love" (2003). He also appeared as the TV host in John Carpenter's acclaimed 1979 made-for-television movie "Elvis," which starred Kurt Russell.

He also was prominently featured in Billy Joel's 1983 music video for the No. 1 hit song "Tell Her About It" -- set during the fictional live telecast of a 1960s Sullivan show on CBS.

 

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Will Vinton, the Academy Award-winning filmmaker who specialized in the stop-motion process known as Claymation (clay animation), died Thursday at the age of 70. His family issued a statement that disclosed he had been battling multiple myeloma for the last 12 years.

Image result for will vinton images

Among the creations by his studio were the popular California Raisins television commercials launched during the 1980s for the California Raisin Advisory Board (and featuring the singing voice of Buddy Miles). In the 1990s, Vinton's operation began the long-running CGI commercials featuring talking M&Ms.

He was nominated for Academy Awards five times (Oscar win is in bold):

  • Best Short Film, Animated (1974) -- "Closed Mondays" (shared with Bob Gardner).
  • Best Short Film, Animated (1978) -- "Rip Van Winkle"
  • Best Short Film, Animated (1981) -- "The Creation"
  • Best Short Film, Animated (1983) -- "The Great Cognito"
  • Best Visual Effects (1985) -- "Return to Oz" (shared with Ian Wingrove, Zoran Perisic and Michael Lloyd). 

Vinton also received several Emmys and Clios (for excellence in television commercials).

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The versatile filmmaker Audrey Wells, who wrote the screenplay for the critically acclaimed new feature "The Hate U Give," died of cancer Thursday at the age of 58.  

The drama, directed by George Tillman, Jr. ("Soul Food," "Men of Honor"), was adapted by Wells from the 2017 novel by Angie Thomas. It opened Friday -- the day after Wells' death -- on a limited basis at theaters in North America. It stars Amandla Stenberg as a black student at a predominantly white prep school who becomes a key witness to a controversial incident in her hometown. The picture, which was hailed at the recent Toronto International Film Festival, also stars Regina Hall, Russell Hornsby, KJ Apa, Issa Rae, Sabrina Carpenter, Common and Anthony Mackie. 

Wells first made a splash in the film industry as the writer of "The Truth About Cats & Dogs," the 1996 romantic comedy that starred Janeane Garofalo, Uma Thurman, Ben Chaplin and Jamie Foxx.

A year later, she co-wrote the screenplay for "George of the Jungle," the live-action screen version of the 1960s Saturday morning cartoon show. The film starred Brendan Fraser, Leslie Mann and Thomas Haden Church.

Wells made her directorial debut with the 1999 drama "Guinevere," which starred Sarah Polley as a young student who becomes involved with an older photographer (Stephen Rea). The film was nominated for the Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Wells, who also wrote the picture, shared Sundance's Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award with the creator of "Joe the King," actor/director Frank Whaley.

In 2003, she wrote, produced and directed "Under the Tuscan Sun," the romantic comedy starring Diane Lane, Sandra Oh and Lindsay Duncan. The film was based on Frances Mayes' 1996 best-selling memoir "Under the Tuscan Sun: At Home in Italy."

Among her other screenplays: "Disney's The Kid" (2000, which starred Bruce Willis), "Shall We Dance?" (2004, with Richard Gere, Jennifer Lopez and Susan Sarandon) and "The Game Plan" (2007, starring Dwayne Johnson).

Image result for audrey wells

 

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The movie producer Arnold Kopelson, whose acclaimed 1986 Vietnam drama "Platoon" won the Academy Award for Best Picture, died Monday at the age of 83.

The film, written and directed by the Vietnam veteran Oliver Stone, also won Oscars for Best Director, Best Sound (John Wilkinson, Richard D. Rogers, Charles Grenzbach and Simon Kaye) and Best Film Editing (Claire Simpson).

In addition, "Platoon" received nominations for Best Supporting Actor (Tom Berenger and Willem Dafoe, who played rival sergeants), Best Original Screenplay (Stone) and Best Cinematography (Robert Richardson). 

Another Kopelson film -- the big-screen version of "The Fugitive" -- received a nomination for Best Picture of 1993. Tommy Lee Jones won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance in the drama as U.S. Deputy Marshal Sam Gerard.

Among the other films produced by Kopelson: "Triumph of the Spirit" (1989, a Holocaust-themed drama that starred Dafoe); "Falling Down" (1993, with Michael Douglas); "Eraser" (1996, which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger); "Se7en" (1995, with Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt); "Outbreak" (1995, which starred Dustin Hoffman, Rene Russo and Freeman); and "Murder at 1600" (1997, with Wesley Snipes and Diane Lane).

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What a colorful career! He co-starred with Marlon Brando on Broadway and appeared in Dan O'Bannon's 1985 zombie comedy "The Return of the Living Dead" (as well as its 1988 sequel).

On November 4, 2014, Karen discussed his experiences as an actor in an interview with New York Film Academy's Mark Sawicki. 

 

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One of those actors seen in so many films, but you never knew who he was (at least I didnt). Knew him by his face though.

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The Louisiana-born singer-songwriter Tony Joe White, known for his swamp-rock sound and the 1969 hit "Polk Salad Annie," has died at the age of 75. He suffered a fatal heart attack on Wednesday at his home near Nashville, Tennessee.

Image result for tony joe white

"Polk Salad Annie," the story of a rural Southern girl raised on the dish also known as polk sallet, was a Top 10 hit for White. It rose as high as No. 8 on the Billboard pop chart.

White also wrote the song "Rainy Night in Georgia," which became a 1970 hit for Brook Benton and was covered by numerous other artists.

 

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"Polk Salad Annie" was frequently covered by Elvis Presley, who performed it in "Elvis: That's the Way It Is" -- the 1970 screen documentary about "The King of Rock 'n' Roll" and his concerts in Las Vegas.

In October 2014, White teamed with Foo Fighters -- featuring lead singer Dave Grohl -- for a memorable performance of "Polk Salad Annie" on CBS' "The Late Show with David Letterman."

 

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In 1989, Tina Turner had a Top 40 hit with her version of White's song "Steamy Windows." White played guitar, harmonica and a synthesizer on the recording, which was included in Turner's album "Foreign Affair."

Also that year, White brought his swampy style to television as the spokesperson for McDonald's commercials promoting a seasonal favorite -- the McRib sandwich.

 

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The African-American poet, playwright and author Ntozake Shange, celebrated for her pieces about women of color, died Saturday. She had been residing at an assisted living facility in Bowie, Maryland after she suffered several strokes.

Born Paulette L. Williams in Trenton, New Jersey, she observed her 70th birthday on October 18. Her African name (pronounced EN-toh-zah-kee SHAHNG-gay) was derived from the Xhosa words meaning "she who comes with her own things" and she "who walks like a lion." 

ntozake-shange.jpg?w=446&h=299&crop=1

Her best-known project was the 1975 stage production "for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf." It opened Off-Broadway and won a 1976-1977 Obie Award as a Distinguished Production. It later moved to Broadway and was nominated for a 1977 Tony Award as Best Play. Cast member Trazana Beverley, who played "Lady in Red," became the first African-American to win the Tony for Best Featured Actress in a Play.

The filmmaker Tyler Perry adapted the play for the screen in 2010. The drama "For Colored Girls," which was written, produced and directed by Perry, starred Janet Jackson, Thandie Newton, Whoopi Goldberg, Phylicia Rashad, Anika Noni Rose, Loretta Devine, Kimberly Elise, Kerry Washington, Tessa Thompson and Macy Gray.

The production won three NAACP Image Awards: Outstanding Motion Picture, Outstanding Directing for a Motion Picture/Television Movie (Perry) and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture (Elise).

 

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