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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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Verna Bloom, a character actress of the 70s and 80s, passed away yesterday at the age of 80. She was best known by the general public for playing the dipsomaniac wife of the dean in 1978's Animal House., but she also played in other films including Medium  Cool , High Plains Drifter, Honkytonk Man, The Journey of Natty Gann, After Hours,  and The Last Temptation of Christ (as the Blessed Virgin Mary)

https://variety.com/2019/film/news/verna-bloom-dead-dies-animal-house-1203104909/

Verna-Bloom-Height-Weight-Body-Statistic

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I remember Verna Bloom best from Medium Cool, which also starred Marianna Hill.

A few years later they were both in High Plains Drifter. Two very sexy dames.

Marianna is still with us.

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12 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I remember Verna Bloom best from Medium Cool, which also starred Marianna Hill.

A few years later they were both in High Plains Drifter. Two very sexy dames.

Marianna is still with us.

Wow, Bloom was an unlikely sex object but still boiler room material.

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5 hours ago, GordonCole said:

Wow, Bloom was an unlikely sex object but still boiler room material.

I found her very sexy in Medium Cool as the small town mom who moved to the

crazy big city. A understated and quiet sexy, but still sexy.

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The veteran actor Paul Koslo, who played numerous villains and occasional good guys onscreen and on television, died last week at the age of 74. He is said to have died of pancreatic cancer on January 9, 2019.

Koslo was born in Germany during World War II. His family emigrated to Canada in 1950. When he was 13, he left home to become an actor.

One of his heroic roles was as Dutch, one of the human survivors of a worldwide biological plague in "The Omega Man" (1971), which starred Charlton Heston and Rosalind Cash (pictured below). The film was based on Richard Matheson's 1954 sci-fi novel "I Am Legend." The tale was filmed two other times as "The Last Man on Earth" (1964, starring Vincent Price) and "I Am Legend" (2007, headlined by Will Smith).

Image result for paul koslo images

Among Koslo's other film credits: "Vanishing Point" (1971), "Joe Kidd" (1972), "Lolly-Madonna XXX" (1973), Mr. Majestyk (1974), "Freebie and the Bean" (1974), "The Drowning Pool" (1975), "Rooster Cogburn" (1975), "Voyage of the Damned" (1976) and "Heaven's Gate" (1980).

His television appearances included the 1979 miniseries "Roots: The Next Generations" as well as the television series "The Rockford Files," "Mission: Impossible," "The Incredible Hulk," "Quincy, M.E.," "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century," "T. J. Hooker," "The A-Team," "The Fall Guy," "Dallas" and "Hunter." 

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On 1/6/2019 at 11:10 AM, HelenBaby2 said:

Christine McGuire, one of the McGuire Sisters singing trio popular in the 1950’s, died at age 92 on December 28, 2018. 

Oh. WOW. Sorry to hear this. She was the oldest. That leaves Phyllis as the only sister left. Dorothy died 5 years or so ago. I was just a child during their heyday, but I remember many of their hits and own several CD compilations.

 

Just read the NYT obit. Odd, they didnt mention her cinema venture. I think it was called Chris McGuire Cinemas back in the 80s. Similar to the Jerry Lewis chain. Unsure if any theaters still exist or the chain.

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Laya Raki passed on December 21,  2018 in Hollywood CA.   Don't know why it took a month to be in the L.A. Times obituary notices Saturday, January 19th.

Her biggest claim to fame was in the film The Seekers (released in US as Land of Fury), with Jack Hawkins.

She was in many British T.V. series and appeared in I Spy.   

Image result for laya raki randell-wood

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On 1/17/2019 at 5:42 PM, Hibi said:

Oh. WOW. Sorry to hear this. She was the oldest. That leaves Phyllis as the only sister left. Dorothy died 5 years or so ago. I was just a child during their heyday, but I remember many of their hits and own several CD compilations.

 

Just read the NYT obit. Odd, they didnt mention her cinema venture. I think it was called Chris McGuire Cinemas back in the 80s. Similar to the Jerry Lewis chain. Unsure if any theaters still exist or the chain.

The McGuire Sisters were good singers: I always enjoyed listening to " Sugartime " on the radio.  They also impressed me with how much they looked alike and dressed alike.

 Phyllis was the only one I ever heard about because she had some kind of Infamous connection with mob boss Sam Giancana.

I didn't know about Chris' movie theaters 

But years ago I saw the Jerry Lewis theaters in Paris. I had no idea they had them in the US as well.

 

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On 1/20/2019 at 12:52 AM, Princess of Tap said:

The McGuire Sisters were good singers: I always enjoyed listening to " Sugartime " on the radio.  They also impressed me with how much they looked alike and dressed alike.

 Phyllis was the only one I ever heard about because she had some kind of Infamous connection with mob boss Sam Giancana.

I didn't know about Chris' movie theaters 

But years ago I saw the Jerry Lewis theaters in Paris. I had no idea they had them in the US as well.

 

Yeah, Phyllis and the mobster! I was too young at the time to know about that, but read about it later! I think HBO or some station did a movie about it called Sugartime (I remember we had the 45  single of that at home. A huge hit for them).

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RIP Dušan Makavejev – Founder of the Black Wave and lifelong radical

The pillar of midcentury Yugoslav cinema leaves an antic, subversive 

Spend enough time immersed in modern American cinema, and one starts to get the wrong idea about political films. It would appear that to comment on the government would require didacticism, a soapbox, and a sense of gravitas befitting the fate-of-a-nation stakes. In midcentury Yugoslavia, this was not the case.

A vibrant, radical, and often bizarre school of filmmaking known as the ‘Black Wave’ sprung from the sociopolitical turbulence of the era, as a new generation of film artists pushed back against state-sponsored oppression with a weaponized offensive of whimsy, surrealism, and subversion. Most prominent among them was Dusan Makavejev, a rabble-rouser with a yen for the silly and provocative in equal measure. He gave the movement a face, an international presence, and in no small part, an identity.

Publications in Bosnia and Serbia have confirmed that Makavejev died early this morning at his home in Belgrade. He was 86 years old.

Born in Belgrade on 13 October, 1932, Makavejev grew up with an innate understanding of how cruel a country could be to its citizens. Life under crypto-fascist dictator Josip Broz Tito, the horrors of the Holocaust, civil wars, mass purges — Makavejev survived it all, and carried the chip on his shoulder into his art.

His films took the powers that be to task, exposing hypocrisy through dark humor and targeted absurdity. His early work in his native Yugoslavia shrugged off the junta’s prescribed doctrine of austerity and repression, suggesting that a good romp in the sack qualifies as an act of protest.

It was there that he made his masterpiece, WR: Mysteries of the Organism, a docu-narrative hybrid forging a daring thesis from Warholian pop detritus, John Wayne impressions, Stalinist propaganda, and **** jokes. To this day, it remains startling in its sheer originality and revolutionary spirit.

Makavejev’s ideologies attracted the attention of Yugoslav censors, who banned him from the country for sixteen years. He’d continue to expand his filmography from the safe refuges of Sweden, France, and America, landing another festival-circuit triumph with his merrily obscene Sweet Movie. For his final formal work, he contributed a segment to an omnibus film titled Danish Girls Show Everything, a fittingly **** end to a career steeped in the pleasures of flesh.

Even so, Makavejev will be remembered primarily not as a common ****, but as a great thinker who understood the potential of erotics to smuggle a more sensitive message to a wider audience. Sex sells, which means sex has to be a necessarily capitalistic enterprise, and it’s in the infinitesimal space between these two ideas that Makavejev set up shop.

Experimental, defiant, and able to command an audience, he should live on as the exemplar for all filmmakers pursuing a political bent.

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Oscar-winning French composer Michel Legrand dies aged 86

 

During a career spanning more than 50 years, Legrand wrote over 200 film and TV scores, as well as songs.

In 1968, he won his first Oscar for the song The Windmills of Your Mind from The Thomas Crown Affair film.

Two more Oscars followed in 1971 and 1983 for the best original scores in Summer of '42 and Yentl films respectively.

In the 1960s, he collaborated with French new wave director Jacques Demy on The Umbrellas of Cherbourg - the work which opened the door for Legrand to Hollywood.

Legrand was known for his often jazz-tinged music.

He had planned to give concerts in Paris in April, the AFP news agency reports.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-47013214?ocid=socialflow_twitter

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I've always loved Legrand's "Love Theme" from the 1972 soundtrack of "Lady Sings the Blues," the film bio in which Diana Ross portrayed the singer Billie Holliday.

Smokey Robinson later added lyrics to the song. It was recorded as "Happy (Love Theme from Lady Sings the Blues)" -- first by Bobby Darin in 1972 and followed by Michael Jackson's 1973 version.

 

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Jonas Mekas obituary

Influential figure in American underground cinema, as a perceptive critic and a maker of films that celebrated ‘little moments of paradise’ in his life

Ronald Bergan

Thu 24 Jan 2019 16.29 GMTLast modified on Thu 24 Jan 2019 17.05 GMT

 

Jonas Mekas, founder of the Anthology Film Archives, in the Anthology cinema room, New York, 1990.  Jonas Mekas, founder of the Anthology Film Archives, in the Anthology cinema room, New York, 1990. Photograph: Bob Berg/Getty Images

Jonas Mekas, who has died aged 96, was one of the most important and influential figures in American underground cinema. The term underground as a film genre originated in the US towards the end of the 1950s, boosted by the magazine Film Culture, of which Mekas was founder and editor-in-chief. The magazine, Mekas’s iconoclastic answer to Cahiers du Cinéma, became the mouthpiece of the American avant garde – rooted in the European avant garde but strongly connected to the Beat movement that emerged at the same time.

In 1958, Mekas became the first film critic of the Village Voice, spotlighting the newest and most radical film-makers in New York City. “I had to protect all the beautiful things that I saw happening in the cinema and that were either butchered or ignored by my colleague writers and by the public.”

Although he was a key player in American film history, Mekas’s early life in Lithuania played a significant part in his own film-making. He was born in the Lithuanian village of Semeniškiai, and in 1944, during the Nazi occupation, he and his younger brother, Adolfas, were arrested and taken to a labour camp in Elmshorn, Hamburg. They escaped eight months later, hiding on a farm near the Danish border for two months until the war ended. Thereafter, they lived in a series of displaced persons’ camps for almost four years.

It was during this time that Mekas’s interest in cinema bloomed. The US army showed movies, one of which, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, made the greatest impression on him. “Especially I remember liking the ending, and the desert, the sense of something crawling. Visually it was interesting. Then I saw another movie, Fred Zinnemann’s The Search, about displaced persons, made immediately after the war. I saw it with my brother and we got very angry about how little understanding of the real situation there was in this film, about what it means to be displaced. So we started writing scripts. That’s when we decided to make our own films.”

After studying philosophy at the University of Mainz, where he also edited a Lithuanian émigré magazine and wrote short stories and poetry, he was sent, with Adolfas, to the US by the UN refugee organisation when the displaced person camps in Germany were dissolved. Weeks after his arrival in Brooklyn, at the end of 1949, Mekas borrowed the money to buy his first Bolex 16mm camera and began to record moments of his life, a practice he continued into the next century.

 

A scene from Jonas Mekas’s first feature film, Guns of the Trees, 1961.

 A scene from Jonas Mekas’s first feature film, Guns of the Trees, 1961. Photograph: Kobal/Rex/Shutter-stock

His first 35mm feature, which he wrote, directed, produced, edited and photographed, was Guns of the Trees (1961), made under the influence of John Cassavetes’ Shadows and Robert Frank and Albert Leslie’s film Pull My Daisy. A real period piece, Guns of the Trees describes aspects of Beat culture in New York through the lives of four fictional characters, one of whom was played by Adolfas. There are discussions of Caryl Chessman’s execution, Nixon’s 1960 campaign, and US hostility towards Fidel CastroAllen Ginsbergnarrates and reads his poems, and there are folk songs on the soundtrack.

 

Mekas followed this with The Brig (1964), a cinéma vérité record of life in a Marine corps jail in Japan. However, by this time he had decided that his talent lay outside the feature film tradition and he shifted to creating a cinematic diary, Diaries, Notes and Sketches, inspired mainly by the example of Stan Brakhage and Marie Menken.

Meanwhile he had co-founded the New American Cinema Group and the Filmmakers’ Cooperative in 1962, prompted by the dearth of interest in his work from existing distributors. It was also a reaction against “the official cinema”, which he claimed was “morally corrupt, aesthetically obsolete, thematically superficial, temperamentally boring … The very slickness of their execution has become a perversion covering the falsity of their themes, their lack of sensibility, their lack of style.”

 

Jonas Mekas, left, with his brother, Adolfas, at the Filmmakers’ Cooperative, New York, in 1962.

 Jonas Mekas, left, with his brother, Adolfas, at the Filmmakers’ Cooperative, New York, in 1962. Photograph: Ian Roberts

Mekas screened avant garde, no-budget independent films at a number of venues, principally the Bleecker Street cinema in Greenwich Village. “We don’t want rosy films, we want them the colour of blood,” he proclaimed. In 1964, he was arrested on obscenity charges and given a six-month suspended sentence for showing a “queer double bill” of Jack Smith’s outrageously camp Flaming Creatures and Jean Genet’s Un Chant d’Amour. Undeterred, he launched a campaign against the censor board.

The first chapter of his film diary was the three-hour Walden (1969), depicting four years in his life, which he called “just images for myself”. This is no ego trip, but a record of the world and the people surrounding him, with Mekas often breaking in to offer his private reflections. The staccato, single-frame flashes, edited directly in the camera, are balanced by longer sequences of dinners, weddings and meetings with a who’s who of counterculture personalities including Timothy LearyAndy WarholNorman MailerJohn Lennon and Yoko Ono.

The main section of Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania (1972) describes the emotional reunion of the Mekas brothers with their 90-year-old mother when they returned home for their first visit since the war. The film opens with a summary of Mekas’s initial experiences in the US and ends with a recognition of the difficulty of recovering the past or returning “home”.

Lost, Lost, Lost (1976) records, over three hours, his early life in the US and his feeling of being an exile. Every few years, Mekas released more of his “home movies”, a phrase he embraced, using much archive material and featuring his friends, many of whom were fellow avant garde film-makers.

He had married Hollis Melton in 1974 and became the father of Oona and Sebastian, in them finding a new subject. Paradise Not Yet Lost (1980) is a memoir of his family’s life in New York and travels abroad. According to Mekas, As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty (2000), was “the ultimate Dogme movie, before the birth of [the Danish film movement] Dogme”. During almost five hours, Mekas invites the viewer to share his family life, although its true subject is the very act of filming itself.

 

Jonas Mekas at The Internet Saga, an exhibition of his video work in Venice to coincide with the 2015 biennale.

 Jonas Mekas at The Internet Saga, an exhibition of his video work in Venice to coincide with the 2015 biennale. Photograph: Getty Images for Zuecca Project

Mekas’s obsession with reclaiming the past took another turn when, in 1969, he led a team to establish the Anthology Film Archives. Over the last 50 years, this has grown into one of the world’s largest and most important repositories of avant garde films.

Mekas called himself a filmer rather than a film-maker (“I don’t really make films; I only keep filming”) or director (“I direct nothing”). He preferred to capture the essence of the moment rather than stage an event. As a perceptive film critic, he was very adept at describing his work, referring to his films as “personal little celebrations and joy … miracles of every day, little moments of paradise … awkward footage that will suddenly sing with an unexpected rapture”.

He continued to film his life almost up to the end of it, one of his last filmsbeing Out-takes from the Life of a Happy Man (2012).

Adolfas died in 2011. Mekas’s marriage ended in divorce. He is survived by his children.

 Jonas Mekas, film-maker and critic, born 24 December 1922; died 23 January 2019
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13 hours ago, mr6666 said:

Oscar-winning French composer Michel Legrand dies aged 86

 

During a career spanning more than 50 years, Legrand wrote over 200 film and TV scores, as well as songs.

In 1968, he won his first Oscar for the song The Windmills of Your Mind from The Thomas Crown Affair film.

Two more Oscars followed in 1971 and 1983 for the best original scores in Summer of '42 and Yentl films respectively.

In the 1960s, he collaborated with French new wave director Jacques Demy on The Umbrellas of Cherbourg - the work which opened the door for Legrand to Hollywood.

Legrand was known for his often jazz-tinged music.

He had planned to give concerts in Paris in April, the AFP news agency reports.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-47013214?ocid=socialflow_twitter

Michel Legrand est mort. Michael the great is how his name translates into English. And Michel is great as one of the few Frenchmen to have a high niche in the American popular song book.

His two most beautiful songs " The Summer Knows ", theme from "The Summer of 42" as sung by Andy Williams and * "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" as sung by Shirley Bassey will always be an important part of American pop standards. The International Quality of his work is stressed by all of the various artists who recorded his music and by his lyricists for these two numbers--two New York, Academy Award winners Marilyn and Alan Bergman.

But the first breakthrough came on through Tony Bennett singing " Watch What Happens "-- One of those beautiful songs from "Les Parapluies de Cherbourg "with English lyrics by the late Norman Gimbel.

 

*BTW-- It goes without saying that Sarah Vaughan also sang all of these songs superbly and if you're not afraid of sublime Jazz Renditions take a chance with Sassy Sarah. 

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Kristoff St. John, the onetime child actor who became an Emmy Award-winning star of the CBS daytime drama "The Young and the Restless," has died at the age of 52. He died Sunday at his home in the San Fernando Valley of a possible alcohol overdose, although authorities are awaiting the results of a Monday autopsy.

St. John won two Daytime Emmy awards for his role as Neil Winters on "The Young and the Restless," which he joined in 1991.

Image result for kristoff st john emmy

 

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Julie Adams (AKA Julia Adams) passed on Feb. 3 per the TCM site.  Most famous role was in Creature From the Black Lagoon, but also appeared in many others and on TV.  She was 92.

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