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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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The INSP network, which shows reruns of The Virginian, has been running a PSA about the COVID-19

virus with James Drury and several other actors. It must have been shot very recently. Yeah, the ownership

of the Shiloh ranch changed pretty frequently, especially in the last few seasons as older actors died.

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Allen Garfield, ‘Nashville’ and ‘The Conversation’ Star Dies of Coronavirus at 80

 

FROM VARIETY

Allen Garfield, an actor who appeared in movies like “Nashville” and “The Stunt Man,” has died of coronavirus, according to his “Nashville” co-star Ronee Blakely. He was 80.

“RIP Allen Garfield, the great actor who played my husband in “Nashville”, has died today of Covid; I hang my head in tears; condolences to family and friends; I will post more later; cast and crew, sending love,” Blakely posted on Facebook on Tuesday.

Garfield first appeared on the big screen in the 1968 film “**** Girls ’69” after studying at the Actors Studio in New York with Elia Kazan and Lee Strasberg. He was known for playing corrupt and villainous businessmen and politicians. His other film credits include Woody Allen’s “Bananas,” “A State of Things, “Until the End of the World” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Conversation” and “The Cotton Club.” His final film appearance was in “Chief Zabu,” which was released in 2016 but filmed in 1986.

The actor resided at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif., after suffering a stroke in 2004. He also had a stroke five years earlier before filming Roman Polanski’s “The Ninth Gate” in 1999.

Before becoming an actor, Garfield was an amateur boxer and worked as a sports reporter.

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Where did Jerry Stiller go to?

What are you talking about?

he went from alzheimers a few days ago, though 92!

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1 hour ago, spence said:

he went from alzheimers a few days ago, though 92!

Where did you read/hear that info, spence? I can't find anything that notes his death.

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https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/apr/10/human-centipede-star-dieter-laser-dies-aged-78

Human Centipede star Dieter Laser dies aged 78

German actor achieved international prominence for his role as a deranged doctor in the film, which won awards at horror and fantasy festivals

‘He was a force of nature’ ... Dieter Laser at the premiere of The Human Centipede (Final Sequence) in Hollywood.
 ‘He was a force of nature’ ... Dieter Laser at the premiere of The Human Centipede (Final Sequence) in Hollywood. Photograph: Albert L Ortega/Getty Images

Dieter Laser, star of outrage-horror film, The Human Centipede, has died aged 78. The news was announced in a post on his Facebook page, saying that the actor had died on 29 February. No cause of death was given.

Laser achieved international prominence for his role in The Human Centipede, playing the deranged doctor who stitches together three captive tourists mouth-to-****, to form the grotesque creation of the title. Written and directed by Dutch film-maker Tom Six and released in 2009, it won a number of awards at horror and fantasy film festivals, including best actor for Laser at the Austin Fantastic Fest. Laser also appeared in the third Human Centipede film, released in 2015, as a sadistic prison boss who orders all the inmates to be sewn together.

Six paid tribute to Laser on social media, writing: “He was a force of nature, an unique human being and an iconic actor. I’m so damn proud we created pop culture together.”

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On 4/8/2020 at 10:53 AM, lavenderblue19 said:

 As far as I can tell from the internet, Jerry Stiller does not have Alzheimer's and is Alive. These posts about  him should be removed. 

Yep, and not only that, but from what his son Ben has said recently, Jerry even at the ripe old age of 92 was still quite amazingly spry during the Feats of Strength portion of the Stiller family's Festivus celebration this past December.

(...although Ben added his dad does seem prone to overdo the Airing of Grievances thing a bit too much these past few years)

 

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Smurfs and Young Frankenstein actor Danny Goldman dies at 80

Danny Goldman, the actor known for voicing Brainy Smurf on the animated series The Smurfs and portraying a persistent med student in Young Frankenstein, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 80.

Doug Ely, Goldman's longtime agent and friend, confirmed the news in a Facebook post.

"It’s with great sadness that I must tell you that Danny Goldman has passed away," Ely wrote. "He passed peacefully at home today amongst family and friends, after having suffered a couple of strokes around New Years."

He added, "Danny was truly one of a kind. He always had strong opinions and didn't mind telling you about them. He was incredibly funny. He loved to root for the little guy and help wherever he could. He had a huge heart. We lost a good one today. He will be missed."

A New York native, Goldman got his start as an actor in the early 1970s, with one of his first credited roles in the NBC comedy The Good Life. He went on to land guest-starring roles in many popular series, including The Partridge Family, Room 222, Columbo, Baretta, and Chico and the Man.

In 1974, he appeared in Mel Brooks' horror-comedy Young Frankenstein, playing a medical student who questions Gene Wilder's title character in the film's opening scene. After years of steady work in TV and film projects, Goldman made his debut on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon The Smurfs, where he voiced Brainy Smurf until 1989. In addition to his acting career, Goldman worked as a casting director for commercials for 30 years.

 

From Entertainment Weekly

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Brian Dennehy, ‘Tommy Boy’ and ‘First Blood’ Star, Dies at 81

From Variety

Brian Dennehy, the winner of two Tonys in a career that also spanned films including “Tommy Boy,” “First Blood” and “Cocoon,” and television, died on Wednesday night in New Haven, Conn. He was 81.

“It is with heavy hearts we announce that our father, Brian passed away last night from natural causes, not Covid-related. Larger than life, generous to a fault, a proud and devoted father and grandfather, he will be missed by his wife Jennifer, family and many friends,” his daughter Elizabeth Dennehy tweeted on Thursday.

His agency ICM also confirmed the news, which TMZ was first to report.

The imposingly tall, barrel-chested Dennehy won his first Tony for his performance as Willy Loman in a revival of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” in 1999 and his second Tony for his turn as James Tyrone in a revival of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” in 2003.

The actor was perhaps the foremost living interpreter of O’Neill’s works. In 2009 Dennehy starred on Broadway as Ephraim Cabot in a revival of the playwright’s “Desire Under the Elms,” and in 2012 he played Larry Slade, the former lefty seeking to drink himself to death, in O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh” at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, reprising the role in 2015 when the production, also starring Nathan Lane, was revived at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City.

The New York Times’ Charles Isherwood, who confessed to being floored by the production of “The Iceman Cometh,” said of the actor: “Even as Mr. Dennehy anatomizes his fellow patrons’ misery (‘They manage to get drunk, by hook or by crook, and keep their pipe dreams, and that’s all they ask of life’), his slab-like face barely registers any trace of feeling at the squalor bubbling into life around him. Larry’s slit eyes remain fixed almost throughout the play on the sweet horizon of nonexistence, although we can tell he, more than anyone else, understands the dark game that Hickey will come to play.”

Underscoring his adeptness with the physical business of being an actor, a scene in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” in which a drunken Tyrone gets onto a table to unscrew many of the bulbs in a lit chandelier left many in the audience with the fear that the actor would tumble off the stage even though they knew Dennehy was not really drunk.

Dennehy had a decades-long association with the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, where most of his explorations of O’Neill originated. He first appeared at the Goodman in 1986 in the title role of Brecht’s “Galileo” and first paired with the theater on O’Neill with a 1990 revival of “The Iceman Cometh” in which he played Hickey. In 1996 he starred there in O’Neill’s “A Touch of the Poet,” playing the tyrannical, Falstaff-like Con Melody.

After his Tony-winning performance in 2003 in O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” he took on the playwright’s obscure, posthumously published one-act “Hughie” at the Goodman in 2004, revisiting the show again in 2010 in repertory with Samuel Beckett’s “Krapp’s Last Tape.”

Dennehy headlined the Goodman’s 2009 “A Global Exploration: Eugene O’Neill in the 21st Century” festival in the revival of “Desire Under the Elms” that subsequently transferred to Broadway.

The production of “Death of a Salesman” that won Dennehy his first Tony originated at the Goodman, later went to the West End and was brought to the smallsceen on Showtime in 2000, resulting in an Emmy nomination for Dennehy as well as a SAG Award and a Golden Globe. The New York Times called it “the performance of his career.”

Dennehy also received Emmy nominations in 1990 for his role as a defense attorney in the telepic “A Killing in a Small Town”; in 1992 both for his role in the Scott Turow-based miniseries “The Burden of Proof” and for his role as serial killer John Wayne Gacy in the telepic “To Catch a Killer”; in 1993 for his role in the miniseries “Murder in the Heartland”; and in 2005 for his role in Showtime’s “Our Fathers,” about the Catholic church’s conspiracy, centering on Boston Cardinal Bernard Law, to conceal sexual abuse.

Reviewing “Our Fathers,” Variety lauded “the ever-brilliant Brian Dennehy in a knockout perf as an outspoken priest who uses the pulpit to denounce Law’s leadership.”

Perhaps Dennehy’s most memorable film role came in Alan J. Pakula’s 1990 adaptation of Scott Turow’s bestselling novel “Presumed Innocent,” starring Harrison Ford as the Chicago assistant district attorney on trial for the murder of a co-worker with whom he had an affair; Dennehy played his boss, who’s up for re-election and has multiple divided loyalties, with a subtlety that was absolutely necessary. Another signal moment was auteur Peter Greenaway’s 1987 film “The Belly of an Architect,” in which the actor starred as the title character; the New York Times said the film “does have a humanizing element in the form of Mr. Dennehy, who brings a robust physicality to Kracklite without missing the essentially cerebral nature of the role; this is one of the best things he has done.”

In the early to mid-’90s Dennehy starred as a Chicago police detective in the “Jack Reed” series of TV movies, several of which he also wrote and directed.

Brian Manion Dennehy was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He served in the Marines from 1959-63, after which he studied history at Columbia, attending the university on a football scholarship. He subsequently earned his MFA in dramatic arts from Yale.

Dennehy made his Broadway debut in 1995 in Brian Friel’s “Translations” opposite Dana Delany. After “Death of a Salesman” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” the actor played Matthew Harrison Brady in a 2007 revival of “Inherit the Wind” opposite Christopher Plummer as Henry Drummond. And in 2014 he starred opposite Carol Burnett and Mia Farrow in a revival of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters.”

The actor made his TV and feature debut in 1977 — a year in which he made appearances in at least 10 series or telepics, including “Kojak,” “MASH” and “”Lou Grant,” and the films “Looking for Mr. Goodbar” and “Semi-Tough.” From that point he maintained a heavy work load for decades.

In 1982 his profile increased significantly thanks to his effective performance in the role of Teasle, the sadistic small-town police chief who is Sylvester Stallone’s lead adversary in “Rambo.”

He had significant roles in the 1983 thriller “Gorky Park” and in 1985’s “Cocoon,” from Ron Howard, and “Silverado.” He was second-billed, after Bryan Brown, in the well-constructed 1986 thriller “F/X,” in which he played a cop not part of the conspiracy, and in the 1991 sequel. He was fourth-billed in “Legal Eagles,” after the star trio of Robert Redford, Debra Winger and Daryl Hannah. In 1987, in the flawed thriller “Best Seller,” he sparred ably with James Woods, who played a conman who approaches Dennehy’s policeman-successful writer with a deal that ought not to be trusted. Dennehy also starred in the 1990 crime drama “The Last of the Finest.” Amidst a sea of work in TV movies, Dennehy appeared in the 1995 indie “The Stars Fell on Henrietta,” starring Robert Duvall; the next year he played Ted Montague, leader of the clan, in Baz Luhrmann’s “Romeo + Juliet.”

In 1981 he recurred on “Dynasty” as D.A. Jake Dunham; the next year Dennehy starred as a fire chief in the brief-running ABC sitcom “Star of the Family.”He tried series television again in 1994 with ABC’s brief-running “Birdland,” in which he played a hospital’s chief of psychiatry, and in NBC’s 2001 sitcom “The Fighting Fitzgeralds,” in which he starred as the reluctant paterfamilias of an unruly Irish clan.

In the highly regarded 1989 TV movie “Day One,” the actor played Gen. Leslie Groves, who oversaw the development of the atomic bomb. In 2000 he starred as Gen. Bogan in the Stephen Frears-directed TV adaptation of nuclear armageddon thriller “Fail Safe.”

Denney was married twice, the first time to Judith Scheff.

He is survived by second wife Jennifer Arnott, a costume designer, whom he married in 1988; three daughters by Scheff, actresses Elizabeth Dennehy and Kathleen Dennehy and Deirdre; as well as son Cormac and daughter Sarah with Arnott.

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Allen Daviau (1942-2020) - Cinematographer who received 5 Oscar nominations, and who was best known for his multiple collaborations with directors Steven Spielberg and Barry Levinson. 

Daviau was Oscar nominated for E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982), The Color Purple (1985), Empire of the Sun (1987), Avalon (1990), and Bugsy (1991). He also worked on such films as Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983 - the Spielberg-directed segment), The Falcon and the Snowman (1985, John Schlesinger), Defending Your Life (1991, Albert Brooks), Fearless (1993, Peter Weir), Congo (1995, Frank Marshall), and Van Helsing (2004, Stephen Sommers).

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JOSEPH ADLER died at 79 yesterday in South Florida. 

He directed and wrote a few movies, including one movie from 1978 called CONVENTION GIRLS that I've always wanted to see.  I've got a poster for it.  He was very busy in the theater scene in the Miami/Coral Gables area for decades. 

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Sorry to hear about Tom Lester. I was just watching Green Acres last night. I don't know if Lester was the

second hardest working man in show business,  but Eb Dawson was likely the laziest farm hand on TV.

R.I.P.

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1 hour ago, jakeem said:

Po8lHinI_bigger.jpeg

Tom Lester, the gawky Mississippi native who starred as the friendly Hooterville farmhand Eb Dawson on the madcap CBS sitcom #GreenAcres, has died
 
3:13 PM · Apr 20, 2020·SocialFlow

Eb, actor Tom Lester, held his own with all of those fine character actors and actresses on "Green Acres". 

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On 4/16/2020 at 1:58 PM, yanceycravat said:

Brian Dennehy, ‘Tommy Boy’ and ‘First Blood’ Star, Dies at 81

From Variety

Brian Dennehy, the winner of two Tonys in a career that also spanned films including “Tommy Boy,” “First Blood” and “Cocoon,” and television, died on Wednesday night in New Haven, Conn. He was 81.

“It is with heavy hearts we announce that our father, Brian passed away last night from natural causes, not Covid-related. Larger than life, generous to a fault, a proud and devoted father and grandfather, he will be missed by his wife Jennifer, family and many friends,” his daughter Elizabeth Dennehy tweeted on Thursday.

His agency ICM also confirmed the news, which TMZ was first to report.

The imposingly tall, barrel-chested Dennehy won his first Tony for his performance as Willy Loman in a revival of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” in 1999 and his second Tony for his turn as James Tyrone in a revival of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” in 2003.

The actor was perhaps the foremost living interpreter of O’Neill’s works. In 2009 Dennehy starred on Broadway as Ephraim Cabot in a revival of the playwright’s “Desire Under the Elms,” and in 2012 he played Larry Slade, the former lefty seeking to drink himself to death, in O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh” at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, reprising the role in 2015 when the production, also starring Nathan Lane, was revived at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City.

The New York Times’ Charles Isherwood, who confessed to being floored by the production of “The Iceman Cometh,” said of the actor: “Even as Mr. Dennehy anatomizes his fellow patrons’ misery (‘They manage to get drunk, by hook or by crook, and keep their pipe dreams, and that’s all they ask of life’), his slab-like face barely registers any trace of feeling at the squalor bubbling into life around him. Larry’s slit eyes remain fixed almost throughout the play on the sweet horizon of nonexistence, although we can tell he, more than anyone else, understands the dark game that Hickey will come to play.”

Underscoring his adeptness with the physical business of being an actor, a scene in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” in which a drunken Tyrone gets onto a table to unscrew many of the bulbs in a lit chandelier left many in the audience with the fear that the actor would tumble off the stage even though they knew Dennehy was not really drunk.

Dennehy had a decades-long association with the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, where most of his explorations of O’Neill originated. He first appeared at the Goodman in 1986 in the title role of Brecht’s “Galileo” and first paired with the theater on O’Neill with a 1990 revival of “The Iceman Cometh” in which he played Hickey. In 1996 he starred there in O’Neill’s “A Touch of the Poet,” playing the tyrannical, Falstaff-like Con Melody.

After his Tony-winning performance in 2003 in O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” he took on the playwright’s obscure, posthumously published one-act “Hughie” at the Goodman in 2004, revisiting the show again in 2010 in repertory with Samuel Beckett’s “Krapp’s Last Tape.”

Dennehy headlined the Goodman’s 2009 “A Global Exploration: Eugene O’Neill in the 21st Century” festival in the revival of “Desire Under the Elms” that subsequently transferred to Broadway.

The production of “Death of a Salesman” that won Dennehy his first Tony originated at the Goodman, later went to the West End and was brought to the smallsceen on Showtime in 2000, resulting in an Emmy nomination for Dennehy as well as a SAG Award and a Golden Globe. The New York Times called it “the performance of his career.”

Dennehy also received Emmy nominations in 1990 for his role as a defense attorney in the telepic “A Killing in a Small Town”; in 1992 both for his role in the Scott Turow-based miniseries “The Burden of Proof” and for his role as serial killer John Wayne Gacy in the telepic “To Catch a Killer”; in 1993 for his role in the miniseries “Murder in the Heartland”; and in 2005 for his role in Showtime’s “Our Fathers,” about the Catholic church’s conspiracy, centering on Boston Cardinal Bernard Law, to conceal sexual abuse.

Reviewing “Our Fathers,” Variety lauded “the ever-brilliant Brian Dennehy in a knockout perf as an outspoken priest who uses the pulpit to denounce Law’s leadership.”

Perhaps Dennehy’s most memorable film role came in Alan J. Pakula’s 1990 adaptation of Scott Turow’s bestselling novel “Presumed Innocent,” starring Harrison Ford as the Chicago assistant district attorney on trial for the murder of a co-worker with whom he had an affair; Dennehy played his boss, who’s up for re-election and has multiple divided loyalties, with a subtlety that was absolutely necessary. Another signal moment was auteur Peter Greenaway’s 1987 film “The Belly of an Architect,” in which the actor starred as the title character; the New York Times said the film “does have a humanizing element in the form of Mr. Dennehy, who brings a robust physicality to Kracklite without missing the essentially cerebral nature of the role; this is one of the best things he has done.”

In the early to mid-’90s Dennehy starred as a Chicago police detective in the “Jack Reed” series of TV movies, several of which he also wrote and directed.

Brian Manion Dennehy was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He served in the Marines from 1959-63, after which he studied history at Columbia, attending the university on a football scholarship. He subsequently earned his MFA in dramatic arts from Yale.

Dennehy made his Broadway debut in 1995 in Brian Friel’s “Translations” opposite Dana Delany. After “Death of a Salesman” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” the actor played Matthew Harrison Brady in a 2007 revival of “Inherit the Wind” opposite Christopher Plummer as Henry Drummond. And in 2014 he starred opposite Carol Burnett and Mia Farrow in a revival of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters.”

The actor made his TV and feature debut in 1977 — a year in which he made appearances in at least 10 series or telepics, including “Kojak,” “MASH” and “”Lou Grant,” and the films “Looking for Mr. Goodbar” and “Semi-Tough.” From that point he maintained a heavy work load for decades.

In 1982 his profile increased significantly thanks to his effective performance in the role of Teasle, the sadistic small-town police chief who is Sylvester Stallone’s lead adversary in “Rambo.”

He had significant roles in the 1983 thriller “Gorky Park” and in 1985’s “Cocoon,” from Ron Howard, and “Silverado.” He was second-billed, after Bryan Brown, in the well-constructed 1986 thriller “F/X,” in which he played a cop not part of the conspiracy, and in the 1991 sequel. He was fourth-billed in “Legal Eagles,” after the star trio of Robert Redford, Debra Winger and Daryl Hannah. In 1987, in the flawed thriller “Best Seller,” he sparred ably with James Woods, who played a conman who approaches Dennehy’s policeman-successful writer with a deal that ought not to be trusted. Dennehy also starred in the 1990 crime drama “The Last of the Finest.” Amidst a sea of work in TV movies, Dennehy appeared in the 1995 indie “The Stars Fell on Henrietta,” starring Robert Duvall; the next year he played Ted Montague, leader of the clan, in Baz Luhrmann’s “Romeo + Juliet.”

In 1981 he recurred on “Dynasty” as D.A. Jake Dunham; the next year Dennehy starred as a fire chief in the brief-running ABC sitcom “Star of the Family.”He tried series television again in 1994 with ABC’s brief-running “Birdland,” in which he played a hospital’s chief of psychiatry, and in NBC’s 2001 sitcom “The Fighting Fitzgeralds,” in which he starred as the reluctant paterfamilias of an unruly Irish clan.

In the highly regarded 1989 TV movie “Day One,” the actor played Gen. Leslie Groves, who oversaw the development of the atomic bomb. In 2000 he starred as Gen. Bogan in the Stephen Frears-directed TV adaptation of nuclear armageddon thriller “Fail Safe.”

Denney was married twice, the first time to Judith Scheff.

He is survived by second wife Jennifer Arnott, a costume designer, whom he married in 1988; three daughters by Scheff, actresses Elizabeth Dennehy and Kathleen Dennehy and Deirdre; as well as son Cormac and daughter Sarah with Arnott.

even at 81 was an absolute stunner to see   didn't get to also meet him on the l984 summer shoot of cocoon down here though, most of the cast however

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