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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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On 4/8/2020 at 1:19 AM, yanceycravat said:

Allen Garfield, ‘Nashville’ and ‘The Conversation’ Star Dies of Coronavirus at 80

 

FROM VARIETY

Allen Garfield, an actor who appeared in movies like “Nashville” and “The Stunt Man,” has died of coronavirus, according to his “Nashville” co-star Ronee Blakely. He was 80.

“RIP Allen Garfield, the great actor who played my husband in “Nashville”, has died today of Covid; I hang my head in tears; condolences to family and friends; I will post more later; cast and crew, sending love,” Blakely posted on Facebook on Tuesday.

Garfield first appeared on the big screen in the 1968 film “**** Girls ’69” after studying at the Actors Studio in New York with Elia Kazan and Lee Strasberg. He was known for playing corrupt and villainous businessmen and politicians. His other film credits include Woody Allen’s “Bananas,” “A State of Things, “Until the End of the World” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Conversation” and “The Cotton Club.” His final film appearance was in “Chief Zabu,” which was released in 2016 but filmed in 1986.

The actor resided at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif., after suffering a stroke in 2004. He also had a stroke five years earlier before filming Roman Polanski’s “The Ninth Gate” in 1999.

Before becoming an actor, Garfield was an amateur boxer and worked as a sports reporter.

GARFIELD caught scarlett fever allegedly riding the rails from NYC to HOLLYWOOD

LOU COSTELLO was said to catch the same thing while he and BUD ABBOTT-(all-time best straight man) were touring during WW2 so much

Pretty certain BOBBY DARIN had it at birth though

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On 4/8/2020 at 11:54 AM, sagebrush said:

Where did you read/hear that info, spence? I can't find anything that notes his death.

Heard it during the news & on talk radio's news?

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Just checke'd myself and i may be wrong with this one?   & maybe it's because I watched his goof (***) tv comedy THE KING OF QUEENS so much? He is in it a ton more hen his wonderful SEINFELD bits

But make no mistake, I by 10 miles love SEINFELD-(my 6th all-timer) in another league over QUEENS

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  • 2 weeks later...

I saw that yesterday about JOHN LAFIA.  I'd seen his movie MAN'S BEST FRIEND several times.  Said he hung himself at age 63.  Sad. 

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Just saw on another website that Florian Schneider, co-found of Kraftwerk, has died of cancer at the

age of 73. May the Krautrock be with you.

 

Florian Schneider, co-founder of Kraftwerk, dies at 73

https://www.cnn.com/2020/05/06/world/florian-schneider-kraftwerk-music-intl/index.html

Played the heck out of Autobahn in 1975 as an 11 year old.  My friend had a copy of the album, and we went through a phase of playing it almost daily.

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That was their most popular album and understandably so. The title track is a total trip.

From a little while later....

 

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Has anyone mentioned Astrid Kirchherr, the German photographer and confidant and inspiration of the novice Beatles during their residencies in  Hamburg, taking some of their earliest iconic pictures? Briefly the lover of the doomed bassist Stu Sutcliffe. She was one week shy of her 82nd birthday.

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16 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Has anyone mentioned Astrid Kirchherr, the German photographer and confidant and inspiration of the novice Beatles during their residencies in  Hamburg, taking some of their earliest iconic pictures? Briefly the lover of the doomed bassist Stu Sutcliffe. She was one week shy of her 82nd birthday.

No.

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18 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Has anyone mentioned Astrid Kirchherr, the German photographer and confidant and inspiration of the novice Beatles during their residencies in  Hamburg, taking some of their earliest iconic pictures? Briefly the lover of the doomed bassist Stu Sutcliffe. She was one week shy of her 82nd birthday.

 

On 5/16/2020 at 12:54 AM, jakeem said:
 

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Astrid Kirchherr took the 1st photo of the Beatles as a group in 1960. She also cut their hair into the “moptop,” a style inspired by an ex-boyfriend. Astrid lived alone in Hamburg. She passed away Wednesday from “a short, serious illness” a week before her birthday
 
Broken heart

#RIPAstrid

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6:52 PM · May 15, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

Here is a post from another Beatlemaniac-- there are few of us on board here.

I remember Astrid very well. The story of Stu Sutcliffe is one that is well-known by all of us Beatlemaniacs.

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Montreal's Monique Mercure dies at 89 after 60-year acting career

Author of the article:
Susan Schwartz  •  Montreal Gazette
Publishing date:
3 hours ago  •  2 minute read
MONTREAL, QUE.: April 25, 2010-- Monique Mercure arrives on the red carpet at the Monument National on Boul. St. Laurent for TVA's Gala Artis in Montreal Sunday April 25, 2010.  (THE GAZETTE/Tim Snow)  Monique Mercure arrives on the red carpet at the Monument National on St-Laurent Blvd. for TVA's Gala Artis in Montreal on April 25, 2010. She died at the age of 89 overnight on Saturday.TIM SNOW / The Gazette

 

The distinguished Canadian stage and screen actor Monique Mercure, who performed in more than 100 roles in French and English theatre in a career spanning more than 60 years, and appeared in dozens of films and several television series, has died at 89.

She died overnight Saturday at Maison St-Raphaël, a palliative-care centre in Outremont, of throat cancer.

On Sunday, there were tributes and messages of condolence on social media from friends, fellow artists and politicians, including Quebec Premier François Legault and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who said Mercure “helped promote Quebec cinema beyond our borders and her legacy will live on through her work.”

Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante tweeted that “on stage as on screen, big or small, Monique Mercure shone and marked our imagination, our culture and our history.”

Simon Brault, director and CEO of the Canada Council for the Arts, said his friend of 30 years was “fiery, brave and determined” and “she also had a sense of humour and self-deprecation far too rare in a world that takes itself so seriously.”

Born Marie Lise Monique Émond in Montreal on Nov. 14, 1930, Mercure studied music at l’École Vincent-d’Indy and dance with Ludmilla Chiriaeff. In 1949, she married the composer Pierre Mercure and they had three children before separating in 1958.

Although she studied drama in Paris at l’École Jacques-Lecoq in Paris and at the Montreal Drama Studio, she considered herself self-taught and said that experience was her teacher.

The Canadian Theatre Encyclopedia called Mercure “one of Canada’s great actors of the classical and modern repertory,” who performed in Quebec and France and in English in England, the United States and across Canada. Productions in which she had roles were as wide-ranging as Albertine en cinq temps by Michel Tremblay, La Mouette (The Seagull), by Anton Chekhov’s  L’hiver de force, by Réjean Ducharme, Molière’s Le Tartuffe de Molière and Les Troyennes/Trojan Women, by Euripides.

Her Canadian film credits include Mon oncle Antoine, by Quebec director Claude Jutra, the 1998 drama The Red Violin and J.A. Martin, photographe, which earned her the Palme d’or for best actress at the Cannes Film Festival for her role as Rose-Aimée.

Directors with whom she worked in her international film career included Robert Altman, Claude Chabrol and David Cronenberg: She won a Genie for best supporting actress in Cronenberg’s 1991 science-fiction drama Naked Lunch and another for her role in Piers Haggard’s film Conquest.

On television, she played in Sous le signe du lion, Le retour, Innocence, Miséricorde, Monsieur le ministre, L’Héritage, Providence et Mémoires vives.

In 1993, Mercure received a Governor General’s performing arts award for lifetime achievement and the Prix Denise-Pelletier. Mercure was named to the Order of Canada as an Officer in 1977 and promoted to Companion in 1994. She was director of the National Theatre School from 1991 to 1997 and artistic director from 1997 to 2000. In 1998, she was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Toronto.

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On 5/29/2020 at 5:08 AM, MikaelaArsenault said:

 

Marge Redmond, Sister Jacqueline on 'The Flying Nun,' Dies at 95

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/marge-redmond-dead-sister-jacqueline-flying-nun-was-95-1140978

 

I remember Marge Redmond from the television series.  She always had some good lines and quips for her character.  The first thing I remember seeing her in was her Sister Liguori character from "The Trouble With Angels", and the touching scene after she dies where Rosalind Russell (Mother Superior of the girl's Catholic school), seen by everyone as the stern, steely-eyed headmistress where she breaks down crying and hugging Liguori's casket in the chapel still gets to me.

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