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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


Richard Kimble
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15 hours ago, MikaelaArsenault said:

Marilyn Bergman Dies: Multiple Oscar, Emmy, Grammy Winning Lyricist Was 93

https://deadline.com/2022/01/marilyn-bergman-dead-oscar-grammy-emmy-winner-was-94-obituary-1234906743/

".........The song-writing duo worked together on numerous shows for stage and screen and were known as ballad specialists.

They wrote hits for Hollywood stars including Barbra Streisand, Fred Astaire and Frank Sinatra.

She died on Saturday at her Los Angeles home with Alan and her daughter by her side, her agent said.

Bergman's cause of death has been reported as respiratory failure, and is not Covid related. She is survived by her husband, 96.

The Bergmans were nominated for 16 Academy Award nominations, winning three times

- for The Way We Were from the 1973 Barbra Streisand film of that name, Windmills of Your Mind from The Thomas Crown Affair in 1968 and for their score for Streisand's Yentl in 1983......."

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My favorite Bergman song is "The Last Time I Felt Like This ", with music by Marvin Hamlisch.

It is sung by Johnny Mathis and Jane Olivor in the forgotten 1978 film "Same Time,  Next Year",  starring  Alan Alda and Ellen Burstyn. 

 

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8 hours ago, MikaelaArsenault said:

 I assume I overlooked on your thread, MikaelaArsenault, but Michael Lang's passing is at least the second notable Woodstock death of late: Mountain's main man, Leslie West, died on December 23rd of last year. Given his health issues and various vices sampled, West incredibly made it to his 75th birthday.

                      leslie-west-woodstock-remembered.jpg

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50 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Re: "In a more positive light, Corky Laing, Mountain's drummer, is still vertical."

 Except that he didn't play Woodstock which is what I was referencing. N.D. Smart was still Mountain's drummer at the time of the mammoth festival.

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3 hours ago, NoShear said:

 Except that he didn't play Woodstock which is what I was referencing. N.D. Smart was still Mountain's drummer at the time of the mammoth festival.

I was noting  the somewhat similar names, not so much  the Woodstock connection, or lack  thereof.  I would call Felix  Pappalardi the co-main man,

at least during Mountain's heyday in the 1970s. 

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2 hours ago, MikaelaArsenault said:

Bob Saget, ‘Full House’ Star, Dies at 65

Just so this headline on AV Club. I never follwed his career much but found him intriguing. He was the star of a heartwarming family sitcom, and yet from what I've always read (never seen any of his material), he also worked as an extremely blue standup comic. Oddly, pretty much the only thing I've ever seen much of him in was as host of a revival of America's Funniest Home Videos, I think?

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Ah ha ha ha, I just clicked on a link to a 20-second YouTube cameo that Saget had in the Dave Chappelle film Half-Baked. It's so vile, I don't thnk I have the trepidation to provide a link. But no doubt you can find it if you want to.

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50 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Re: "I was noting  the somewhat similar names, not so much  the Woodstock connection, or lack  thereof.  I would call Felix  Pappalardi the co-main man,

at least during Mountain's heyday in the 1970s."

  Again, it was strictly Woodstock and death. I agree, though, that I shortchanged Felix Pappalardi - at least where the studio is concerned.

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5 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Just so this headline on AV Club. I never follwed his career much but found him intriguing. He was the star of a heartwarming family sitcom, and yet from what I've always read (never seen any of his material), he also worked as an extremely blue standup comic. Oddly, pretty much the only thing I've ever seen much of him in was as host of a revival of America's Funniest Home Videos, I think?

Here are all of his acting credits courtesy of IMDB:

https://m.imdb.com/name/nm0756114/filmotype/actor?ref_=m_nmfm_1

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Biracial opera singer Maria Ewing, the Detroiter ex-wife of Sir Peter Hall, whose experience of 'passing' as white inspired her daughter Rebecca Hall's directorial debut, dies aged 71 

Biracial American opera singer Maria Ewing dies aged 71 

The opera singer Maria Ewing, the ex-wife of theater director Sir Peter Hall and the mother of actress-director Rebecca Hall (together right), has died at the age of 71. A soprano and mezzo-soprano known for her intense performances (left and right inset), Ewing met Sir Peter (center and left inset), a founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company and then director of the National Theatre, while performing at Glyndebourne in 1979 and the pair fell 'madly in love', despite Hall being married to his second wife at the time. Rebecca (right), 39, recently spoke of how her mother's racial heritage had remained an unspoken mystery in her family for many years.

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Ronnie Spector, lead singer of The Ronettes, dead at 78   on January 12th.  

 

(CNN)Ronnie Spector, the swaggering 1960s pop icon with the sky-high beehive whose sultry, quavering voice-powered numerous hits for The Ronettes, including "Be My Baby," has died, her family announced in a statement Wednesday.

She was 78.
"Our beloved earth angel, Ronnie, peacefully left this world today after a brief battle with cancer," the family said. "She was with family and in the arms of her husband, Jonathan. Ronnie lived her life with a twinkle in her eye, a spunky attitude, a wicked sense of humor and a smile on her face."
Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys has called "Be My Baby" the greatest pop recording ever produced.
 
 
Tributes to Spector's talent began pouring in from music royalty.
"I just heard the news about Ronnie Spector and I don't know what to say," Wilson wrote on Twitter. "I loved her voice so much and she was a very special person and a dear friend. This just breaks my heart. Ronnie's music and spirit will live forever."
Joan Jett said Spector's "mark on rock and roll is indelible."
Born Veronica Bennett in the Spanish Harlem neighborhood of New York City, she formed the Ronettes in 1961 with an older sister and a cousin while she was still a teenager.
The group didn't become famous until after they auditioned two years later for music producer Phil Spector, creator of the 1960s' "Wall of Sound" style, who signed them to his label.
Fueled by the runaway success of "Be My Baby," their first single for Spector, they toured the country with Dick Clark's Caravan of Stars and reeled off a string of pop hits over the next several years, including "Baby I Love You," "Walking in the Rain" and "Do I Love You?"
The girl group also became hugely popular in England, where the Ronettes headlined over acts such as the Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton and The Yardbirds, according to Ronnie Spector's website, and later opened for the Beatles on their final US tour in 1966.
The group broke up in 1967. Soon after Ronnie wed Phil Spector, with whom she had a tumultuous relationship. The couple divorced in 1974.
In her memoir, "Be My Baby: How I Survived Mascara, Miniskirts, and Madness," Ronnie Spector described her husband as controlling and emotionally abusive.
In social media posts after his death last year, she famously said, "he was a brilliant producer, but a lousy husband."
In 1988, Ronnie Spector and the Ronettes sued Phil Spector for more than $10 million in royalties and licensing fees. A court eventually ordered him to pay the Ronettes royalties twice a year.
Phil Spector was later convicted of murdering actress Lana Clarkson and sentenced to 19 years in prison. He died behind bars.
Her family said Ronnie Spector "was filled with love and gratitude. Her joyful sound, playful nature and magical presence will live on in all who knew, heard or saw her. In lieu of flowers, Ronnie requested that donations be made to your local women's shelter or to the American Indian College Fund. A celebration of Ronnie's life and music will be announced in the future. The family respectfully asks for privacy at this time."

 

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Just read about Ronnie Spector on the AV Club, wanted to make sure this was mentioned somewhere before I started a new thread. "Be My Baby" is an extraordinary, goosebump-inducing song, the perfect "marriage", if you will, of Ronnie's vocal and Phil's production talents. Spector, for all his genius, appears to have turned out to have been not much of a human being, and I'm happy she survived him and enjoyed some degree of success on her own.

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3 hours ago, nakano said:

Ronnie Spector, lead singer of The Ronettes, dead at 78   on January 12th.  

 

(CNN)Ronnie Spector, the swaggering 1960s pop icon with the sky-high beehive whose sultry, quavering voice-powered numerous hits for The Ronettes, including "Be My Baby," has died, her family announced in a statement Wednesday.

She was 78.
"Our beloved earth angel, Ronnie, peacefully left this world today after a brief battle with cancer," the family said. "She was with family and in the arms of her husband, Jonathan. Ronnie lived her life with a twinkle in her eye, a spunky attitude, a wicked sense of humor and a smile on her face."
Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys has called "Be My Baby" the greatest pop recording ever produced.
 
 
Tributes to Spector's talent began pouring in from music royalty.
"I just heard the news about Ronnie Spector and I don't know what to say," Wilson wrote on Twitter. "I loved her voice so much and she was a very special person and a dear friend. This just breaks my heart. Ronnie's music and spirit will live forever."
Joan Jett said Spector's "mark on rock and roll is indelible."
Born Veronica Bennett in the Spanish Harlem neighborhood of New York City, she formed the Ronettes in 1961 with an older sister and a cousin while she was still a teenager.
The group didn't become famous until after they auditioned two years later for music producer Phil Spector, creator of the 1960s' "Wall of Sound" style, who signed them to his label.
Fueled by the runaway success of "Be My Baby," their first single for Spector, they toured the country with Dick Clark's Caravan of Stars and reeled off a string of pop hits over the next several years, including "Baby I Love You," "Walking in the Rain" and "Do I Love You?"
The girl group also became hugely popular in England, where the Ronettes headlined over acts such as the Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton and The Yardbirds, according to Ronnie Spector's website, and later opened for the Beatles on their final US tour in 1966.
The group broke up in 1967. Soon after Ronnie wed Phil Spector, with whom she had a tumultuous relationship. The couple divorced in 1974.
In her memoir, "Be My Baby: How I Survived Mascara, Miniskirts, and Madness," Ronnie Spector described her husband as controlling and emotionally abusive.
In social media posts after his death last year, she famously said, "he was a brilliant producer, but a lousy husband."
In 1988, Ronnie Spector and the Ronettes sued Phil Spector for more than $10 million in royalties and licensing fees. A court eventually ordered him to pay the Ronettes royalties twice a year.
Phil Spector was later convicted of murdering actress Lana Clarkson and sentenced to 19 years in prison. He died behind bars.
Her family said Ronnie Spector "was filled with love and gratitude. Her joyful sound, playful nature and magical presence will live on in all who knew, heard or saw her. In lieu of flowers, Ronnie requested that donations be made to your local women's shelter or to the American Indian College Fund. A celebration of Ronnie's life and music will be announced in the future. The family respectfully asks for privacy at this time."

 

I recall that they went on tour with the Beatles in '65. 

But they were one of those All-American early 60's rock recording artists who really were permanently displaced by the Brit invasion.

Although Phil Spector journeyed on without them having successfully leeched on to the Righteous Brothers and Ike & Tina Turner.

 

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Sorry to hear about this. I must confess I was unaware she was still living, not having heard anything about her in some time. Boy, she was young when her career took off - 18 when The Time Machine and Where the Boys Are were released. I'm sure TCM can work up a tribute night with those two movies and Light in the Piazza.

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