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I have been enjoying reading posts and watching the movies.  Still a little behind in the movies.  Has anyone thought about costumes as part of the noir films.  Maybe it is just me but I love the hats.  The ladies all wear gloves and some of the evening wear is quite spectacular.  I may have noticed because I love hats.  Another thought.  I have noticed some Alfred Hitchcock similarities in some films.  The common man caught up in a web of intrigue and having to fight for his life.  One last question I just watched "The Gangster."  Loved it. Barry Sullivan was superb.  In the Night club scene Nancy sang a song that sounded like something that was sung in Disney's "Cinderella" or maybe "Snow White".  Did anyone else recognize it?

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I have been enjoying reading posts and watching the movies.  Still a little behind in the movies.  Has anyone thought about costumes as part of the noir films.  Maybe it is just me but I love the hats.  The ladies all wear gloves and some of the evening wear is quite spectacular.  I may have noticed because I love hats.  Another thought.  I have noticed some Alfred Hitchcock similarities in some films.  The common man caught up in a web of intrigue and having to fight for his life.  One last question I just watched "The Gangster."  Loved it. Barry Sullivan was superb.  In the Night club scene Nancy sang a song that sounded like something that was sung in Disney's "Cinderella" or maybe "Snow White".  Did anyone else recognize it?

 

Be sure to watch Laura for some of great women hats.   While some of them look 'odd',  on Gene Tierney they look great.   Not sure other women could pull off such a look.     While I'm not big on fashion hats seen in 40s films are cool and add to the overall vibe.

 

As for Hitchcock;  Well there is a chicken \ egg thing going on there as in 'who took from whom'  \ who did it first?  

 

Sorry I don't recall the song but there are many in-the-know around here so I'm sure someone else will.

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Hello annlib;

 

I recommend you look into the interesting career of Edith Head.

 

You could start on the IMDb web site.

 

Think you'll find a satisfying search about costuming as mise en scène.

 

Have a nice day.

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Another random thought/observation in classic Noir there are no machine gun battles or firings, the Hayes Code effect.

 

I can only remember a few Noirs with machine guns that got around the ban in creative ways, near the end of The Big Combo there is a sequence with a very noir/macabre touch, and I also recall a small battle at the end of a Noir in a machine shop/warehouse, and didn't The Big Sleep have a gangster go out a door, the door then closes and a strip of holes gets blasted diagonally across the door.

 

Anyway what I'm getting at is that an awful lot of so called Neo Noirs have way, way, too many automatics they kill the Noir mood, ditto for car chases and explosions.

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Another random thought/observation in classic Noir there are no machine gun battles or firings, the Hayes Code effect.

 

I can only remember a few Noirs with machine guns that got around the ban in creative ways, near the end of The Big Combo there is a sequence with a very noir/macabre touch, and I also recall a small battle at the end of a Noir in a machine shop/warehouse, and didn't The Big Sleep have a gangster go out a door, the door then closes and a strip of holes gets blasted diagonally across the door.

 

Anyway what I'm getting at is that an awful lot of so called Neo Noirs have way, way, too many automatics they kill the Noir mood, ditto for car chases and explosions.

 

The type of violence found in noir films of the 40s and 50s is different than the gangster films in the 30s.   Here are some comments from the book Film Noir (Silver \ Ward) related to this;

 

The gangster film contains violence that is explosive, almost flamboyant and graced with staccato rhythm; machine guns blazing; wild bullets burst from moving cars; bombs shattering storefronts.   The noir film's use of violence is more controlled and ultimately more brutal.   There is a ritualization of violence that is unique; Bianco's shooting in Kiss of Death, Wallace Ford's death in a steam bath in T-Men,  John Ireland perfuming his bullets in Railroaded;  Alan Ladd's vicious beating in The Glass Key.

 

The effect tends to deglamorize violence and direct attention to the concept of pain rather than cinematic action.

***

I wonder how much of this was due to enforcement of the Production code (e.g. many of the most violence 30s gangster films were done in the pre-code era) or just a change in film style.

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Another random thought/observation in classic Noir there are no machine gun battles or firings, the Hayes Code effect.

 

I can only remember a few Noirs with machine guns that got around the ban in creative ways, near the end of The Big Combo there is a sequence with a very noir/macabre touch, and I also recall a small battle at the end of a Noir in a machine shop/warehouse, and didn't The Big Sleep have a gangster go out a door, the door then closes and a strip of holes gets blasted diagonally across the door.

 

Anyway what I'm getting at is that an awful lot of so called Neo Noirs have way, way, too many automatics they kill the Noir mood, ditto for car chases and explosions.

I think the Hays Code actually helped in the development of film noir. It forced writers, directors, and cinematographers to think outside the box when it came to crime films. Creators had to get inventive on producing a good, finished product, and a lot of that resulted in high tension.

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I think the Hays Code actually helped in the development of film noir. It forced writers, directors, and cinematographers to think outside the box when it came to crime films. Creators had to get inventive on producing a good, finished product, and a lot of that resulted in high tension.

It did agree. But budget constraints of a "B" film had a lot to do with keeping the stories simple, small scale, intimate, also.

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I have been enjoying reading posts and watching the movies. Still a little behind in the movies. Has anyone thought about costumes as part of the noir films. Maybe it is just me but I love the hats. The ladies all wear gloves and some of the evening wear is quite spectacular. I may have noticed because I love hats. Another thought. I have noticed some Alfred Hitchcock similarities in some films. The common man caught up in a web of intrigue and having to fight for his life. One last question I just watched "The Gangster." Loved it. Barry Sullivan was superb. In the Night club scene Nancy sang a song that sounded like something that was sung in Disney's "Cinderella" or maybe "Snow White". Did anyone else recognize it?

No femme fatale or honied heroine seems to be complete without a dynamite fur coat too. I love 40s fashion! I own sevfauxral.
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Has anyone thought about costumes as part of the noir films.  Maybe it is just me but I love the hats.  The ladies all wear gloves and some of the evening wear is quite spectacular.  I may have noticed because I love hats. 

 

Generally speaking, hats and gloves had always been an essential part of women's wardrobe up to about the 1960s. As for film noir, the wardrobe selection had its purpose especially in use of black or white ensembles. They were always symbolic of a woman's status as either a femme fatale or heroine.They also signified their personality. 

 

 

 

Another thought.  I have noticed some Alfred Hitchcock similarities in some films.  The common man caught up in a web of intrigue and having to fight for his life. 

 

There is a lot of debate as to whether or not Hitchcock films can be classified as film noir. No doubt his films can be classified as suspense/thriller, mystery, and horror genres. However, the style can be noir. I would classify some of his films as true film noir such as Strangers on a Train, Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious.  I would also classify these color films as a noir style Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest. I am a little bias, though, as I am a huge Hitchcock fan (I even have his profile tattooed on my arm).

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Generally speaking, hats and gloves had always been an essential part of women's wardrobe up to about the 1960s. As for film noir, the wardrobe selection had its purpose especially in use of black or white ensembles. They were always symbolic of a woman's status as either a femme fatale or heroine.They also signified their personality. 

 

 

There is a lot of debate as to whether or not Hitchcock films can be classified as film noir. No doubt his films can be classified as suspense/thriller, mystery, and horror genres. However, the style can be noir. I would classify some of his films as true film noir such as Strangers on a Train, Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious.  I would also classify these color films as a noir style Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest. I am a little bias, though, as I am a huge Hitchcock fan (I even have his profile tattooed on my arm).

 

FYI, the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver), includes write ups for the 3 Hitchcock films you mention along with The Wrong Man. 

 

Yes, you're a huge Hitchcock fan indeed.  I don't even have Ava Gardner tattooed on my arm.   :D

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FYI, the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver), includes write ups for the 3 Hitchcock films you mention along with The Wrong Man. 

 

Yes, you're a huge Hitchcock fan indeed.  I don't even have Ava Gardner tattooed on my arm.   :D

 

IMG_2370.JPG

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There is a lot of debate as to whether or not Hitchcock films can be classified as film noir. No doubt his films can be classified as suspense/thriller, mystery, and horror genres. However, the style can be noir. I would classify some of his films as true film noir such as Strangers on a Train, Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious.  I would also classify these color films as a noir style Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest. I am a little bias, though, as I am a huge Hitchcock fan (I even have his profile tattooed on my arm).

I'm inclined to include Saboteur and Psycho with those.

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